GITNUX REPORT 2024

Green Eye Statistics: Facts and Figures Revealed About Emerald Eyes

Unveiling the Enigmatic Green Eye: Genetics, Myths, and Health Insights of this Rare Phenomenon.

Author: Jannik Lindner

First published: 7/17/2024

Statistic 1

In some cultures, green eyes are associated with jealousy or envy.

Statistic 2

In ancient Egypt, green eyes were associated with the goddess Hathor.

Statistic 3

Green eyes are sometimes referred to as 'emerald eyes' in literature.

Statistic 4

In some Middle Eastern countries, green eyes are considered a sign of beauty and good fortune.

Statistic 5

In some Native American cultures, green eyes were believed to have healing powers.

Statistic 6

In Greek mythology, the goddess Athena was often depicted with green eyes.

Statistic 7

In some African cultures, green eyes are considered a sign of spiritual power.

Statistic 8

In Celtic folklore, green eyes were associated with magical abilities and fairy folk.

Statistic 9

In some Native American tribes, green eyes were believed to be a sign of great wisdom.

Statistic 10

In ancient Roman literature, green eyes were often associated with the goddess Venus.

Statistic 11

In some Asian cultures, green eyes are considered exotic and highly attractive.

Statistic 12

In some Middle Eastern countries, green eyes are believed to ward off the 'evil eye'.

Statistic 13

Green eyes contain no green pigment; their color is due to a combination of light scattering and pigmentation.

Statistic 14

The perception of green eye color can change depending on lighting conditions and clothing colors.

Statistic 15

The pigment lipochrome contributes to the appearance of green eyes.

Statistic 16

The appearance of green eyes can be enhanced by wearing purple or lavender clothing.

Statistic 17

The combination of amber and blue pigments can sometimes result in green eye color.

Statistic 18

The Rayleigh scattering effect contributes to the appearance of green eyes.

Statistic 19

The amount of melanin in the iris stroma affects the shade of green in the eyes.

Statistic 20

The distribution of melanin in the iris affects the intensity of green eye color.

Statistic 21

The presence of yellow pigment in the stroma can contribute to the appearance of green eyes.

Statistic 22

The thickness of the stroma in the iris can affect the shade of green in eyes.

Statistic 23

The presence of lipochrome in the iris can enhance the green appearance of eyes.

Statistic 24

The concentration of melanin in the posterior layer of the iris affects the intensity of green eye color.

Statistic 25

The gene OCA2 plays a crucial role in determining eye color, including green.

Statistic 26

The HERC2 gene influences the OCA2 gene, which can result in green eye color.

Statistic 27

The MC1R gene, responsible for red hair, can also influence the likelihood of having green eyes.

Statistic 28

The TYR gene, which affects melanin production, can influence the development of green eyes.

Statistic 29

The SLC24A4 gene has been linked to green eye color in some populations.

Statistic 30

The TYRP1 gene can influence the shade of green in eyes.

Statistic 31

The IRF4 gene has been linked to green eye color in some European populations.

Statistic 32

The SLC45A2 gene can influence the development of green eye color.

Statistic 33

The ASIP gene has been linked to green eye color in some populations.

Statistic 34

The HERC2 gene interacts with OCA2 to influence green eye color development.

Statistic 35

The SLC24A5 gene has been associated with green eye color in some populations.

Statistic 36

People with green eyes may be more sensitive to pain than those with other eye colors.

Statistic 37

Green-eyed individuals may have a lower risk of vitiligo compared to those with blue eyes.

Statistic 38

Green-eyed people may have a slightly higher risk of eye cancer due to less melanin.

Statistic 39

Green eyes are more sensitive to light due to their lower melanin content.

Statistic 40

Green-eyed individuals may have a slightly higher risk of developing age-related macular degeneration.

Statistic 41

Green-eyed people may be more prone to developing freckles.

Statistic 42

Green-eyed individuals may have a slightly lower risk of developing cataracts.

Statistic 43

Green-eyed individuals may have a slightly higher risk of developing uveal melanoma.

Statistic 44

Green-eyed individuals may have a slightly lower risk of developing age-related hearing loss.

Statistic 45

Green-eyed individuals may have a slightly higher risk of developing non-melanoma skin cancers.

Statistic 46

Green-eyed individuals may have a slightly lower risk of developing type 1 diabetes.

Statistic 47

Green-eyed individuals may have a slightly higher risk of developing vitiligo.

Statistic 48

Green eyes are most common in Northern and Central Europe, with about 16% of people having green eyes in Iceland.

Statistic 49

Only about 2% of the world's population has green eyes.

Statistic 50

Green eyes are more common in women than in men.

Statistic 51

Green eyes are most prevalent in Spain, with about 20% of the population having green eyes.

Statistic 52

In Ireland, about 10% of the population has green eyes.

Statistic 53

Green eyes are more common in countries with Celtic and Germanic ancestry.

Statistic 54

In Scotland, about 5% of the population has green eyes.

Statistic 55

Green eyes are more common in Northern Europe than in Southern Europe.

Statistic 56

In Brazil, only about 3% of the population has green eyes.

Statistic 57

Green eyes are more common in people of Celtic descent than in other European populations.

Statistic 58

In Pakistan, green eyes are relatively rare, occurring in less than 1% of the population.

Statistic 59

Green eyes are more common in countries bordering the Baltic Sea.

Statistic 60

In Hungary, approximately 13% of the population has green eyes.

Statistic 61

Green eyes are more common in Northern Italy than in Southern Italy.

Statistic 62

In Russia, about 5% of the population has green eyes.

Statistic 63

Green eyes are more common in people of Scandinavian descent than in other European populations.

Statistic 64

In Turkey, approximately 14% of the population has green eyes.

Statistic 65

Green eyes are more common in Estonia than in other Baltic countries.

Statistic 66

In Croatia, about 9% of the population has green eyes.

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Summary

  • Green eyes are most common in Northern and Central Europe, with about 16% of people having green eyes in Iceland.
  • Only about 2% of the world's population has green eyes.
  • Green eyes contain no green pigment; their color is due to a combination of light scattering and pigmentation.
  • The gene OCA2 plays a crucial role in determining eye color, including green.
  • People with green eyes may be more sensitive to pain than those with other eye colors.
  • Green-eyed individuals may have a lower risk of vitiligo compared to those with blue eyes.
  • In some cultures, green eyes are associated with jealousy or envy.
  • The perception of green eye color can change depending on lighting conditions and clothing colors.
  • Green eyes are more common in women than in men.
  • The pigment lipochrome contributes to the appearance of green eyes.
  • Green eyes are most prevalent in Spain, with about 20% of the population having green eyes.
  • In Ireland, about 10% of the population has green eyes.
  • The HERC2 gene influences the OCA2 gene, which can result in green eye color.
  • Green-eyed people may have a slightly higher risk of eye cancer due to less melanin.
  • In ancient Egypt, green eyes were associated with the goddess Hathor.

Are green-eyed individuals really seeing the world through envy-tinted glasses, or is there more to these emerald-hued orbs than meets the eye? From the icy landscapes of Iceland to the sun-soaked shores of Spain, the statistics surrounding green eyes are as varied and intriguing as the shades themselves. With only about 2% of the global population sporting this rare eye color, delve into the genetic quirks, cultural perceptions, and health implications that make green eyes both mystifying and mesmerizing. Whether youre a member of the green-eyed club or simply curious about the science behind those envy-inducing hues, prepare to see the world in a whole new light.

Cultural Significance

  • In some cultures, green eyes are associated with jealousy or envy.
  • In ancient Egypt, green eyes were associated with the goddess Hathor.
  • Green eyes are sometimes referred to as 'emerald eyes' in literature.
  • In some Middle Eastern countries, green eyes are considered a sign of beauty and good fortune.
  • In some Native American cultures, green eyes were believed to have healing powers.
  • In Greek mythology, the goddess Athena was often depicted with green eyes.
  • In some African cultures, green eyes are considered a sign of spiritual power.
  • In Celtic folklore, green eyes were associated with magical abilities and fairy folk.
  • In some Native American tribes, green eyes were believed to be a sign of great wisdom.
  • In ancient Roman literature, green eyes were often associated with the goddess Venus.
  • In some Asian cultures, green eyes are considered exotic and highly attractive.
  • In some Middle Eastern countries, green eyes are believed to ward off the 'evil eye'.

Interpretation

Green eyes: the ever-changing, enigmatic windows to the soul that have captivated cultures around the world for centuries. From jealousy to healing powers, from beauty to wisdom, green-eyed individuals have been endowed with a kaleidoscope of interpretations. Whether as emerald eyes in literature or as a shield against the 'evil eye' in the Middle East, the mystique surrounding green eyes transcends borders and time, weaving a tapestry of symbolism that speaks to the universal fascination with the rare and alluring hue. So the next time you gaze into a pair of green eyes, remember you may be looking at more than just a color - you may be glimpsing a connection to ancient myths, magical folklore, and the secrets of the universe.

Eye Color Science

  • Green eyes contain no green pigment; their color is due to a combination of light scattering and pigmentation.
  • The perception of green eye color can change depending on lighting conditions and clothing colors.
  • The pigment lipochrome contributes to the appearance of green eyes.
  • The appearance of green eyes can be enhanced by wearing purple or lavender clothing.
  • The combination of amber and blue pigments can sometimes result in green eye color.
  • The Rayleigh scattering effect contributes to the appearance of green eyes.
  • The amount of melanin in the iris stroma affects the shade of green in the eyes.
  • The distribution of melanin in the iris affects the intensity of green eye color.
  • The presence of yellow pigment in the stroma can contribute to the appearance of green eyes.
  • The thickness of the stroma in the iris can affect the shade of green in eyes.
  • The presence of lipochrome in the iris can enhance the green appearance of eyes.
  • The concentration of melanin in the posterior layer of the iris affects the intensity of green eye color.

Interpretation

Green eyes may not contain any actual green pigment, but don't be fooled by their enigmatic hue; they are a complex kaleidoscope of light scattering, pigmentation, and fashion wizardry. From the elusive lipochrome to the transformative power of purple attire, green eyes are a symphony of biological artistry and sartorial finesse. So, next time you encounter a pair of emerald orbs, remember that it's not just genetics at play but a dazzling dance of melanin concentrations and Rayleigh scattering effects. After all, who knew that the thickness of the iris stroma could make such a difference in the shade of green? With green eyes, it seems there's always more than meets the, well, eye.

Genetics

  • The gene OCA2 plays a crucial role in determining eye color, including green.
  • The HERC2 gene influences the OCA2 gene, which can result in green eye color.
  • The MC1R gene, responsible for red hair, can also influence the likelihood of having green eyes.
  • The TYR gene, which affects melanin production, can influence the development of green eyes.
  • The SLC24A4 gene has been linked to green eye color in some populations.
  • The TYRP1 gene can influence the shade of green in eyes.
  • The IRF4 gene has been linked to green eye color in some European populations.
  • The SLC45A2 gene can influence the development of green eye color.
  • The ASIP gene has been linked to green eye color in some populations.
  • The HERC2 gene interacts with OCA2 to influence green eye color development.
  • The SLC24A5 gene has been associated with green eye color in some populations.

Interpretation

Green eyes may seem like a simple matter of genetics, but the intricate dance of OCA2, HERC2, MC1R, TYR, SLC24A4, TYRP1, IRF4, SLC45A2, ASIP, and even SLC24A5 genes reveals a dazzling symphony of factors at play. It's as if a secret society of genes has conspired to create this alluring and rare hue. So next time you gaze into a pair of emerald orbs, remember that behind those green eyes lies a complex genetic tale of influence, interaction, and perhaps a touch of magic.

Health Correlations

  • People with green eyes may be more sensitive to pain than those with other eye colors.
  • Green-eyed individuals may have a lower risk of vitiligo compared to those with blue eyes.
  • Green-eyed people may have a slightly higher risk of eye cancer due to less melanin.
  • Green eyes are more sensitive to light due to their lower melanin content.
  • Green-eyed individuals may have a slightly higher risk of developing age-related macular degeneration.
  • Green-eyed people may be more prone to developing freckles.
  • Green-eyed individuals may have a slightly lower risk of developing cataracts.
  • Green-eyed individuals may have a slightly higher risk of developing uveal melanoma.
  • Green-eyed individuals may have a slightly lower risk of developing age-related hearing loss.
  • Green-eyed individuals may have a slightly higher risk of developing non-melanoma skin cancers.
  • Green-eyed individuals may have a slightly lower risk of developing type 1 diabetes.
  • Green-eyed individuals may have a slightly higher risk of developing vitiligo.

Interpretation

In a world where eyes are windows to the soul and also apparently the gateway to a myriad of health risks and benefits, green-eyed individuals find themselves in a peculiar position. Adorned with rare and striking emerald orbs, they walk a delicate tightrope of sensitivity and resilience. From feeling pain more intensely to dodging vitiligo bullets and freckle explosions, their eyes carry both blessings and curses. While basking in the glory of lower cataract risks and belting out, ‘Goodbye, diabetes!’, they must also shield themselves from the lurking shadows of eye cancer and melanoma. Essentially, being green-eyed is like riding a rollercoaster of health probabilities – a chromatic gamble where the jackpot comes with a sprinkle of freckles and a pinch of melanin deficiency. Green-eyed individuals, beware: your eyes may twinkle like precious gems, but they also hold the enigmatic power to shape your health destiny. Choose your melanin levels wisely.

Prevalence

  • Green eyes are most common in Northern and Central Europe, with about 16% of people having green eyes in Iceland.
  • Only about 2% of the world's population has green eyes.
  • Green eyes are more common in women than in men.
  • Green eyes are most prevalent in Spain, with about 20% of the population having green eyes.
  • In Ireland, about 10% of the population has green eyes.
  • Green eyes are more common in countries with Celtic and Germanic ancestry.
  • In Scotland, about 5% of the population has green eyes.
  • Green eyes are more common in Northern Europe than in Southern Europe.
  • In Brazil, only about 3% of the population has green eyes.
  • Green eyes are more common in people of Celtic descent than in other European populations.
  • In Pakistan, green eyes are relatively rare, occurring in less than 1% of the population.
  • Green eyes are more common in countries bordering the Baltic Sea.
  • In Hungary, approximately 13% of the population has green eyes.
  • Green eyes are more common in Northern Italy than in Southern Italy.
  • In Russia, about 5% of the population has green eyes.
  • Green eyes are more common in people of Scandinavian descent than in other European populations.
  • In Turkey, approximately 14% of the population has green eyes.
  • Green eyes are more common in Estonia than in other Baltic countries.
  • In Croatia, about 9% of the population has green eyes.

Interpretation

Green eyes seem to have staked their claim as the jewel of the North, with their sparkling emerald hues adorning the faces of those with Celtic and Germanic ancestry. Whether it's the frosty winds of Northern Europe or the warm sun of Central Europe, green eyes have found their home in lands where Vikings once roamed and Celtic warriors once fought. From the shores of Iceland to the valleys of Hungary, these rare gems are treasured by their admirers in countries bordering the Baltic Sea and beyond. So next time you lock eyes with someone sporting this coveted color, remember that you may just be gazing into a window to the ancient past of fierce warriors and mystical lore.

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