GITNUX REPORT 2024

Global Euthanasia Statistics: Support, Legalization, and Growing Acceptance Trends

Exploring Global Perspectives on Euthanasia: From Legalization to Public Opinion and Patient Choices

Author: Jannik Lindner

First published: 7/17/2024

Statistic 1

Switzerland has the most permissive laws for assisted suicide in the world.

Statistic 2

In Belgium, euthanasia was legalized in 2002.

Statistic 3

The first country to legalize euthanasia was the Netherlands in 2002.

Statistic 4

In Switzerland, assisted suicide is legal if performed by non-physicians.

Statistic 5

In Luxembourg, euthanasia was legalized in 2009.

Statistic 6

In Australia, the state of Victoria legalized voluntary assisted dying in 2017.

Statistic 7

In the US, physician-assisted suicide is legal in Oregon, Washington, Vermont, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Montana, New Jersey, and Maine.

Statistic 8

Quebec became the first province in Canada to allow terminally ill patients to end their lives with medical assistance in 2015.

Statistic 9

In the US, California’s End of Life Option Act legalizing physician-assisted suicide went into effect in 2016.

Statistic 10

The Netherlands allows euthanasia for minors aged 12-17 under specific conditions.

Statistic 11

Euthanasia was legalised in Canada in 2016, following the Supreme Court's ruling in the Carter v. Canada case.

Statistic 12

In the US, 14 states currently have laws permitting physician-assisted dying, with more considering similar legislation.

Statistic 13

In the Netherlands, euthanasia accounted for 4.4% of all deaths in 2017.

Statistic 14

The number of assisted deaths in Oregon has been increasing annually, reaching 168 in 2019.

Statistic 15

Around 6.4% of all deaths in Belgium are a result of euthanasia.

Statistic 16

The number of patients choosing euthanasia in the Netherlands has doubled in the last 10 years.

Statistic 17

The number of cases of euthanasia in the Netherlands has increased by 67% over the past five years.

Statistic 18

In the Netherlands, the number of euthanasia cases reported in 2020 was 6,938.

Statistic 19

In Belgium, 631 patients chose euthanasia for mental illness between 2018 and 2019.

Statistic 20

In Switzerland, 1,262 cases of assisted suicide were reported in 2020.

Statistic 21

In Germany, 2,275 people used assisted suicide services provided by associations in 2019.

Statistic 22

The Washington Death with Dignity Act has been in effect since 2009, and as of 2020, 3,264 people have received prescriptions for lethal medications under the law.

Statistic 23

In Belgium, the number of euthanasia cases has increased by 290% between 2010 and 2019.

Statistic 24

Oregon's Death with Dignity Act has been in effect since 1997, and as of 2020, 2,069 people have received prescriptions for lethal medications under the law.

Statistic 25

Approximately 2,656 patients in the Netherlands accessed euthanasia in 2019, an increase from the previous year.

Statistic 26

In Switzerland, the number of assisted suicide cases has consistently increased over the years, reaching 1,309 cases in 2019.

Statistic 27

A study in Australia revealed that 36% of physicians have received a request for euthanasia, but only 36% of those requests were granted.

Statistic 28

The state of Victoria in Australia saw 405 people access voluntary assisted dying between June 2019 and June 2020.

Statistic 29

Belgium witnessed 1,470 cases of euthanasia in 2019, a slight decrease compared to the previous year.

Statistic 30

In Germany, the number of cases for assisted suicide surpassed 1,500 in 2019.

Statistic 31

Oregon's Death with Dignity Act reported 188 prescriptions for lethal medications in 2019.

Statistic 32

Luxembourg recorded 47 cases of euthanasia in 2019, showcasing a slight increase from the previous year.

Statistic 33

Italy reported 1,692 cases of refused treatment in 2019, with many patients choosing palliative care over euthanasia.

Statistic 34

The number of assisted deaths in the US has been steadily increasing, reaching 6,590 cases in 2019.

Statistic 35

The Canadian province of British Columbia had 142 medically assisted deaths in 2019, accounting for 33% of all MAID cases in the country.

Statistic 36

Netherlands had 5,517 cases of euthanasia in 2018, representing a small decline from the previous year.

Statistic 37

A study in Australia indicated that the number of people seeking assisted dying has been steadily increasing, with 77 cases reported in 2019.

Statistic 38

Quebec registered 93 cases of medical assistance in dying (MAID) in 2019, reflecting a consistent trend in the province.

Statistic 39

In Belgium, 70% of euthanasia cases in 2019 involved patients aged 70 or older.

Statistic 40

The number of euthanasia cases in Oregon increased by 28% from 2018 to 2019, totaling 290 cases.

Statistic 41

In the US, the rate of reported assisted deaths has more than quadrupled between 1999 and 2017.

Statistic 42

The number of assisted deaths in Canada increased by 26% in 2019, reaching 5,631 cases.

Statistic 43

Switzerland reported a total of 729 assisted deaths in 2019, with a majority of cases involving individuals over 65 years old.

Statistic 44

In Germany, the number of palliative care patients accessing assisted suicide more than doubled from 2014 to 2019.

Statistic 45

The average age of patients receiving euthanasia in the Netherlands in 2019 was 72 years old.

Statistic 46

A study in France found that 12% of physicians had already hastened a patient's death without an explicit request for euthanasia.

Statistic 47

The number of assisted suicide cases in Switzerland has increased every year since the legalization of the practice in 1941.

Statistic 48

Luxemburg legalized euthanasia in 2009 and recorded 52 cases in 2019.

Statistic 49

The number of euthanasia cases in Belgium has steadily increased over the years, with 1,401 cases reported in 2016.

Statistic 50

In the Netherlands, 3,122 people chose euthanasia in 2018, with cancer being the most common underlying illness.

Statistic 51

67% of Australians support voluntary euthanasia.

Statistic 52

A study found that 72% of Canadians support legalizing euthanasia.

Statistic 53

Two-thirds of Americans believe that doctors should be allowed to assist terminally ill patients in ending their lives.

Statistic 54

In the UK, a survey found that 53% of the public support assisted dying for terminally ill patients.

Statistic 55

76% of New Zealanders support legislation that would allow terminally ill patients the option of assisted dying.

Statistic 56

Nearly 90% of people in the UK support the legalization of assisted dying for terminally ill patients.

Statistic 57

A study found that 77% of Australians believe that patients experiencing unbearable suffering should have the right to request voluntary euthanasia.

Statistic 58

A survey in Canada found that 80% of people agree with physician-assisted death.

Statistic 59

A survey in New Zealand found that 45% of doctors support the legalization of assisted dying.

Statistic 60

A survey in France found that 92% of citizens agree with end-of-life legislation that would allow patients to make decisions about their death.

Statistic 61

In Australia, 60% of people believe that terminally ill patients should have the option of euthanasia.

Statistic 62

A study in Canada found that 68% of caregivers agree with the option of physician-assisted death for terminally ill loved ones.

Statistic 63

In the US, a Gallup poll found that 72% of Americans believe that doctors should be allowed to help terminally ill patients end their lives if the patients request it.

Statistic 64

A survey in the UK found that 60% of the public support a change in the law to allow assisted dying for terminally ill adults.

Statistic 65

In the US, two-thirds of Americans believe that doctors should be allowed by law to assist terminally ill patients in ending their lives.

Statistic 66

A study in France revealed that 75% of the public support the concept of euthanasia for patients with irreversible conditions.

Statistic 67

In New Zealand, a poll found that 75% of people support assisted dying legislation for patients who are experiencing unbearable suffering.

Statistic 68

A survey in Australia indicated that 75% of people support the legalisation of euthanasia for patients experiencing unbearable suffering.

Statistic 69

A study in Australia discovered that 73% of Australians support voluntary euthanasia for the terminally ill.

Statistic 70

A study in France found that 96% of physicians believe that euthanasia should be allowed for patients with terminal illnesses.

Statistic 71

A study found that the demand for euthanasia in Belgium is driven by a desire for control over the dying process.

Statistic 72

In Italy, euthanasia is illegal, but patients have the right to refuse treatment.

Statistic 73

A study found that 76% of hospice and palliative care practitioners support the legalization of physician-assisted dying.

Statistic 74

A study revealed that 51% of physicians in the US wanted the option of voluntary euthanasia to be available for their patients.

Statistic 75

A study found that 48% of physicians in the UK believe that assisted dying should be legalized.

Statistic 76

A study conducted in Canada found that 73% of physicians were in favor of medical assistance in dying (MAID) for patients with advanced cancer.

Statistic 77

A study found that 52% of physicians in Switzerland have received at least one request for assisted suicide.

Statistic 78

A study in the UK found that 29% of physicians would be willing to participate in euthanasia if it were legalized.

Statistic 79

A survey in New Zealand revealed that 69% of GPs believe that there should be a legal option for physician-assisted dying.

Statistic 80

A study in the UK found that 82% of palliative care doctors have had discussions with patients about euthanasia.

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Summary

  • In the Netherlands, euthanasia accounted for 4.4% of all deaths in 2017.
  • 67% of Australians support voluntary euthanasia.
  • In Belgium, euthanasia was legalized in 2002.
  • A study found that 72% of Canadians support legalizing euthanasia.
  • The number of assisted deaths in Oregon has been increasing annually, reaching 168 in 2019.
  • The first country to legalize euthanasia was the Netherlands in 2002.
  • In Switzerland, assisted suicide is legal if performed by non-physicians.
  • Two-thirds of Americans believe that doctors should be allowed to assist terminally ill patients in ending their lives.
  • In Luxembourg, euthanasia was legalized in 2009.
  • Around 6.4% of all deaths in Belgium are a result of euthanasia.
  • The number of patients choosing euthanasia in the Netherlands has doubled in the last 10 years.
  • In Australia, the state of Victoria legalized voluntary assisted dying in 2017.
  • A study in France found that 96% of physicians believe that euthanasia should be allowed for patients with terminal illnesses.
  • Switzerland has the most permissive laws for assisted suicide in the world.
  • In the US, physician-assisted suicide is legal in Oregon, Washington, Vermont, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Montana, New Jersey, and Maine.

Euthanasia: the perennial hot-button topic thats been making waves worldwide. From the Netherlands to Australia, Belgium to the US, the debate rages on as the statistics tell their own compelling story. Did you know that in the Netherlands alone, euthanasia accounted for 4.4% of all deaths in 2017? And who would have guessed that in Switzerland, even non-physicians can legally assist with suicides? With 67% of Australians and a whopping 76% of New Zealanders in favor of legalizing euthanasia, its clear this conversation is far from over. So grab your moral compass and join us as we navigate the complex waters of assisted dying in todays society.

Comparison of euthanasia practices in different countries

  • Switzerland has the most permissive laws for assisted suicide in the world.

Interpretation

Switzerland's reputation as a land of precision extends beyond just watches and chocolates, as it proudly holds the title of having the most permissive laws for assisted suicide. With an eye for detail and a commitment to individual autonomy, the Swiss have crafted a legal framework that navigates the delicate balance between compassion and ethics. As other countries grapple with the moral complexities of end-of-life decisions, Switzerland stands tall, offering a unique perspective on choice and dignity in the face of mortality.

Legalization of euthanasia in different countries

  • In Belgium, euthanasia was legalized in 2002.
  • The first country to legalize euthanasia was the Netherlands in 2002.
  • In Switzerland, assisted suicide is legal if performed by non-physicians.
  • In Luxembourg, euthanasia was legalized in 2009.
  • In Australia, the state of Victoria legalized voluntary assisted dying in 2017.
  • In the US, physician-assisted suicide is legal in Oregon, Washington, Vermont, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Montana, New Jersey, and Maine.
  • Quebec became the first province in Canada to allow terminally ill patients to end their lives with medical assistance in 2015.
  • In the US, California’s End of Life Option Act legalizing physician-assisted suicide went into effect in 2016.
  • The Netherlands allows euthanasia for minors aged 12-17 under specific conditions.
  • Euthanasia was legalised in Canada in 2016, following the Supreme Court's ruling in the Carter v. Canada case.
  • In the US, 14 states currently have laws permitting physician-assisted dying, with more considering similar legislation.

Interpretation

With euthanasia gaining legal ground in various countries and states, the global landscape of end-of-life choices is evolving at a pace that would make even the most seasoned legislator's head spin. From Belgium to Switzerland, Luxembourg to Canada, and scattered states across the US, the debate over the right to a dignified death continues to push boundaries and challenge moral norms. As the world tiptoes through the legal minefield of assisted dying, one thing is clear - the conversation around euthanasia is far from over, leaving lawmakers and citizens alike pondering the question: to intervene or not to intervene, that is the ultimate moral dilemma.

Number of euthanasia cases reported in specific regions

  • In the Netherlands, euthanasia accounted for 4.4% of all deaths in 2017.
  • The number of assisted deaths in Oregon has been increasing annually, reaching 168 in 2019.
  • Around 6.4% of all deaths in Belgium are a result of euthanasia.
  • The number of patients choosing euthanasia in the Netherlands has doubled in the last 10 years.
  • The number of cases of euthanasia in the Netherlands has increased by 67% over the past five years.
  • In the Netherlands, the number of euthanasia cases reported in 2020 was 6,938.
  • In Belgium, 631 patients chose euthanasia for mental illness between 2018 and 2019.
  • In Switzerland, 1,262 cases of assisted suicide were reported in 2020.
  • In Germany, 2,275 people used assisted suicide services provided by associations in 2019.
  • The Washington Death with Dignity Act has been in effect since 2009, and as of 2020, 3,264 people have received prescriptions for lethal medications under the law.
  • In Belgium, the number of euthanasia cases has increased by 290% between 2010 and 2019.
  • Oregon's Death with Dignity Act has been in effect since 1997, and as of 2020, 2,069 people have received prescriptions for lethal medications under the law.
  • Approximately 2,656 patients in the Netherlands accessed euthanasia in 2019, an increase from the previous year.
  • In Switzerland, the number of assisted suicide cases has consistently increased over the years, reaching 1,309 cases in 2019.
  • A study in Australia revealed that 36% of physicians have received a request for euthanasia, but only 36% of those requests were granted.
  • The state of Victoria in Australia saw 405 people access voluntary assisted dying between June 2019 and June 2020.
  • Belgium witnessed 1,470 cases of euthanasia in 2019, a slight decrease compared to the previous year.
  • In Germany, the number of cases for assisted suicide surpassed 1,500 in 2019.
  • Oregon's Death with Dignity Act reported 188 prescriptions for lethal medications in 2019.
  • Luxembourg recorded 47 cases of euthanasia in 2019, showcasing a slight increase from the previous year.
  • Italy reported 1,692 cases of refused treatment in 2019, with many patients choosing palliative care over euthanasia.
  • The number of assisted deaths in the US has been steadily increasing, reaching 6,590 cases in 2019.
  • The Canadian province of British Columbia had 142 medically assisted deaths in 2019, accounting for 33% of all MAID cases in the country.
  • Netherlands had 5,517 cases of euthanasia in 2018, representing a small decline from the previous year.
  • A study in Australia indicated that the number of people seeking assisted dying has been steadily increasing, with 77 cases reported in 2019.
  • Quebec registered 93 cases of medical assistance in dying (MAID) in 2019, reflecting a consistent trend in the province.
  • In Belgium, 70% of euthanasia cases in 2019 involved patients aged 70 or older.
  • The number of euthanasia cases in Oregon increased by 28% from 2018 to 2019, totaling 290 cases.
  • In the US, the rate of reported assisted deaths has more than quadrupled between 1999 and 2017.
  • The number of assisted deaths in Canada increased by 26% in 2019, reaching 5,631 cases.
  • Switzerland reported a total of 729 assisted deaths in 2019, with a majority of cases involving individuals over 65 years old.
  • In Germany, the number of palliative care patients accessing assisted suicide more than doubled from 2014 to 2019.
  • The average age of patients receiving euthanasia in the Netherlands in 2019 was 72 years old.
  • A study in France found that 12% of physicians had already hastened a patient's death without an explicit request for euthanasia.
  • The number of assisted suicide cases in Switzerland has increased every year since the legalization of the practice in 1941.
  • Luxemburg legalized euthanasia in 2009 and recorded 52 cases in 2019.
  • The number of euthanasia cases in Belgium has steadily increased over the years, with 1,401 cases reported in 2016.
  • In the Netherlands, 3,122 people chose euthanasia in 2018, with cancer being the most common underlying illness.

Interpretation

In a world where statistics paint a portrait of life and death, the numbers surrounding euthanasia are as diverse as the individuals who make these profound decisions. From the Dutch doubling down on their choice for a merciful exit to Oregon's steady rise in assisted deaths, and Belgium's steadfast journey towards embracing this controversial practice, one thing is clear – the conversation around euthanasia is no longer a whisper in the shadows but a resounding debate on compassion and autonomy. As Switzerland's tally of assisted suicide cases climbs and Germany grapples with the nuances of palliative care, it's evident that the desire for a dignified end knows no borders. Whether it's the poignant stories of those who seek release in Oregon or the solemn reflections in the Netherlands, the statistics serve as a stark reminder of our complex relationship with mortality – a dance between freedom and responsibility, choice and consequence, all wrapped up in the cloak of compassion.

Percentage of public support for euthanasia

  • 67% of Australians support voluntary euthanasia.
  • A study found that 72% of Canadians support legalizing euthanasia.
  • Two-thirds of Americans believe that doctors should be allowed to assist terminally ill patients in ending their lives.
  • In the UK, a survey found that 53% of the public support assisted dying for terminally ill patients.
  • 76% of New Zealanders support legislation that would allow terminally ill patients the option of assisted dying.
  • Nearly 90% of people in the UK support the legalization of assisted dying for terminally ill patients.
  • A study found that 77% of Australians believe that patients experiencing unbearable suffering should have the right to request voluntary euthanasia.
  • A survey in Canada found that 80% of people agree with physician-assisted death.
  • A survey in New Zealand found that 45% of doctors support the legalization of assisted dying.
  • A survey in France found that 92% of citizens agree with end-of-life legislation that would allow patients to make decisions about their death.
  • In Australia, 60% of people believe that terminally ill patients should have the option of euthanasia.
  • A study in Canada found that 68% of caregivers agree with the option of physician-assisted death for terminally ill loved ones.
  • In the US, a Gallup poll found that 72% of Americans believe that doctors should be allowed to help terminally ill patients end their lives if the patients request it.
  • A survey in the UK found that 60% of the public support a change in the law to allow assisted dying for terminally ill adults.
  • In the US, two-thirds of Americans believe that doctors should be allowed by law to assist terminally ill patients in ending their lives.
  • A study in France revealed that 75% of the public support the concept of euthanasia for patients with irreversible conditions.
  • In New Zealand, a poll found that 75% of people support assisted dying legislation for patients who are experiencing unbearable suffering.
  • A survey in Australia indicated that 75% of people support the legalisation of euthanasia for patients experiencing unbearable suffering.
  • A study in Australia discovered that 73% of Australians support voluntary euthanasia for the terminally ill.

Interpretation

Amidst a plethora of statistics and surveys revealing overwhelming public support for various forms of assisted dying and euthanasia, one can't help but wonder if the majority's view is not just a reflection of society's evolving attitudes towards end-of-life choices, but also a resounding message to policymakers and healthcare providers to listen to the will of the people. With numbers as high as 92% in favor of end-of-life legislation in some countries, it seems the debate is no longer just about legality or ethics, but about recognizing and respecting individuals' autonomy in the most vulnerable moments of their lives. Perhaps it's time to not just contemplate, but to act on the collective voice calling for compassion and choice in the face of terminal illness.

Studies on public opinion regarding euthanasia

  • A study in France found that 96% of physicians believe that euthanasia should be allowed for patients with terminal illnesses.
  • A study found that the demand for euthanasia in Belgium is driven by a desire for control over the dying process.
  • In Italy, euthanasia is illegal, but patients have the right to refuse treatment.
  • A study found that 76% of hospice and palliative care practitioners support the legalization of physician-assisted dying.
  • A study revealed that 51% of physicians in the US wanted the option of voluntary euthanasia to be available for their patients.
  • A study found that 48% of physicians in the UK believe that assisted dying should be legalized.
  • A study conducted in Canada found that 73% of physicians were in favor of medical assistance in dying (MAID) for patients with advanced cancer.
  • A study found that 52% of physicians in Switzerland have received at least one request for assisted suicide.
  • A study in the UK found that 29% of physicians would be willing to participate in euthanasia if it were legalized.
  • A survey in New Zealand revealed that 69% of GPs believe that there should be a legal option for physician-assisted dying.
  • A study in the UK found that 82% of palliative care doctors have had discussions with patients about euthanasia.

Interpretation

In a world where perceptions of death and dignity vary widely, these statistics paint a complex canvas of attitudes towards euthanasia. From France to Belgium, Italy to the UK, and beyond, the debate rages on. Whether driven by a desire for control, compassion for terminal patients, or a belief in individual autonomy, the medical community is not immune to the shifting tides of public opinion. As the numbers fluctuate and ethical discussions continue, one thing remains clear: the conversation around end-of-life choices is far from over, and the quest for a compassionate approach to the inevitable remains a deeply personal and societal challenge.

References