GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

College Voters Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important College Voters Statistics

  • According to a 2020 study, 71% of college students said they were "absolutely certain" they would vote in the 2020 election.
  • In the 2018 midterms, college student voting rates doubled compared to 2014.
  • An estimated 50% of college students voted in the 2016 presidential election, compared to 48.3% in 2012.
  • Among college students, 68% of women voted in the 2020 Presidential Election.
  • In the 2020 election, 48% of college students indicated a preference for voting by mail.
  • 64.7% of college and university students were registered to vote in the 2016 presidential election.
  • Approximately 40% of community college students were likely to vote in the 2016 presidential election.
  • 77% percent of Hispanic and Latino students at colleges said they were “absolutely certain” about voting in 2020.
  • In the 2020 US presidential election, 23% of the vote was from voters aged 18-29, many of whom are college students.
  • In the 2020 US elections, 85% of college students voted for President Biden, while 10% voted for former President Trump.

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Welcome to our latest blog post exploring the intriguing world of college voters and their vital role in shaping the political landscape. Within the realm of College Voters Statistics, we delve into numerical insights, trends, and participation rates, bearing testament to their evolving political participation. Enlighten yourself as we unveil facts and figures about these young individuals, whose ballots play a significant role in democratic verdicts. Understand their preferences, influences, and behavior patterns in different election cycles, showcasing the dynamic interplay of education and politics.

The Latest College Voters Statistics Unveiled

According to a 2020 study, 71% of college students said they were “absolutely certain” they would vote in the 2020 election.

Illuminating the potency of the youthful voice, the compelling statistic demonstrates that over two-thirds, or 71%, of college students expressed unwavering certainty about participating in the 2020 election according to a 2020 study. This reveals an inspiringly high level of political engagement among the college demographic. In a blog post detailing College Voters Statistics, such a figure underscores not only the growing political awareness and commitment in younger generations, but also how this cohort, often seen as apathetic, could notably influence the election outcome. The impressive number suggests opportunities for mobilising and empowering students, potentially swinging the vote, and ultimately shaping the political landscape of the future.

In the 2018 midterms, college student voting rates doubled compared to 2014.

Shedding light on the impressive statistic that college student voting rates skyrocketed by doubling in the 2018 midterm elections compared to 2014, one can perceive a vivid transformation within America’s political landscape. This surge divulges not just an increased interest among college students in their nation’s governance but also reflects their elevated determination to influence it. In a blog post focused on College Voters Statistics, this data point becomes an essential narrative thread, underpinning the argument of a significant youth awakening in political matters, an empowered generation ready to make their voices heard at the ballot box.

An estimated 50% of college students voted in the 2016 presidential election, compared to 48.3% in 2012.

Highlighting the pivotal role of college students in shaping electoral outcomes, the statistic that posts an increase from 48.3% in 2012 to 50% in 2016 Presidential election showcases considerable growth. The upward trend signifies the burgeoning political consciousness among millennial and Gen Z students, which could swing the power balance in future elections. In this realm of college voters’ statistics, such a rise in participation merits attention, as it can lead to thorough investigations into student voting behaviors, impacts of educational institutions on political participation, and potential strategies to enhance voter turnout in this demographic.

Among college students, 68% of women voted in the 2020 Presidential Election.

Highlighting the trend that 68% of women in college participated in the 2020 Presidential Election, underscores the increasing engagement and political interest of this demographic. In the context of college voters statistics, it is a poignant revelation about the evolution of voting patterns among young adults, particularly focusing on female students. This noteworthy statistic exemplifies not only the power of the youth in shaping the political landscape, but also the growing role of women in exercising their civic duties, making it a pivotal point of discussion in comprehending the dynamics of contemporary political participation.

In the 2020 election, 48% of college students indicated a preference for voting by mail.

Given the backdrop of the 2020 election, where the outbreak of a global pandemic made traditional voting methods a health risk, the statistic indicating “48% of college students indicated a preference for voting by mail,” underscores a significant trend. It reflects how college voters, which constitute a considerable chunk of the voter base, are readily adapting to alternative voting methods. This adaptation suggests that safety, convenience, and the digital shift could impact future patterns of casting votes, painting a transformative scene within the college voters’ landscape.

64.7% of college and university students were registered to vote in the 2016 presidential election.

Highlighting the figure of 64.7% of college and university students being registered to vote in the 2016 presidential election underscores a significant trend in the political engagement of this demographic. It serves to emphasize their increasing interest and involvement in the electoral process, potentially shaping political outcomes and influencing policy-making on a national scale. As future thought leaders and decision-makers, these students represent an important sector with unique needs, interests, and stance on issues. Hence, their participation rate is a crucial barometer for understanding their collective political consciousness. This data point is a wake up call for political strategists to treat them as an influential voter bloc where cultivating their votes could be game-changing.

Approximately 40% of community college students were likely to vote in the 2016 presidential election.

Highlighting that nearly 40% of community college students expected to vote in the 2016 presidential election is a compelling feature in the context of a blog post on College Voters Statistics. It not only underscores the political engagement of this demographic, but also serves as an important indication of the potential influence this group can wield on election outcomes. As community college students comprise a significant portion of the national student body, their voting habits provide crucial insights into the political dynamics of younger generations, which could shape future campaigning strategies and policy development for educators, politicians, and activists alike.

77% percent of Hispanic and Latino students at colleges said they were “absolutely certain” about voting in 2020.

In the landscape of College Voters Statistics, the resounding voice of Hispanic and Latino students manifests itself as a striking figure – a monumental 77% affirm their unswerving certainty about voting in 2020. These figures do more than just showcasing participation intent, they potentially herald a demographic shift in the electorate, illuminate the increasing political consciousness among this group, and highlight the substantial political influence that Hispanic and Latino college students can wield in shaping the political and social discourse of the nation. Consequently, this statistic demands attention not just for its sheer magnitude, but also for the insights it provides into the engagement, empowerment, and emerging political identity of Hispanic and Latino college students.

In the 2020 US presidential election, 23% of the vote was from voters aged 18-29, many of whom are college students.

The aforementioned statistic spotlights the undeniable influence of younger voters, particularly college students, on the 2020 US Presidential election results. It portrays a vivid portrait of their active political participation and the enlivened role they played. In fact, they form a sizeable 23% of the electorate, anchoring their place as a demographic that cannot be discounted. At a time when the perception of youth apathy towards politics is heightened, this statistic counteracts this narrative and calls for more focused attention on the political sentiments and engagement of college voters, their unique perspectives and their growing electoral power. Therefore, in the larger framework of College Voters Statistics, this percentage forms a potent cornerstone to assess and compare their evolving political trends and engagement levels over the years.

In the 2020 US elections, 85% of college students voted for President Biden, while 10% voted for former President Trump.

Unpacking the hefty electoral sway harbored by academia, the 2020 US elections spotlighted quite a fascinating trend: a sweeping 85% of college students cast their ballots for President Biden, contrasted with a scant 10% supporting former President Trump. In examining the dynamics of the college voting landscape, this staggering schism not only underscores the ideological leanings of the current younger generation but also gives a glimpse into a potential political sea-change in the years to come, making it an indispensable focus point in any discussion around College Voters Statistics.

Conclusion

Considering the current statistics, college student involvement in voting has been significantly impactful in shaping the political landscape. The trends indicate an upward shift in their voting rate, demonstrating a rising political awareness and engagement amongst this demographic. Nevertheless, there’s still room for growth in voter participation. These statistics underline the potential power college voters hold in future elections and emphasize the importance of ongoing efforts to make voting more accessible and attractive to the younger population.

References

0. – https://www.knightfoundation.org

1. – https://www.circle.tufts.edu

2. – https://www.idhe.tufts.edu

3. – https://www.www.insidehighered.com

4. – https://www.people.com

5. – https://www.nscresearchcenter.org

6. – https://www.www.brookings.edu

7. – https://www.civicyouth.org

8. – https://www.www.washingtonpost.com

9. – https://www.www.cnn.com

FAQs

What percentage of college students typically vote in elections?

The percentage can vary depending on the election and other factors, but in the 2018 midterm elections, 40.3% of college students voted according to the National Study of Learning, Voting, and Engagement (NSLVE), a significant increase compared to just 19.3% in 2014.

Are college students more likely to vote Democrat or Republican?

While it varies by school and location, generally speaking, younger voters including college students tend more often to vote Democrat. However, there continue to be significant proportions who vote Republican or Independent.

Do more college-educated individuals vote compared to non-college educated individuals?

Yes, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, individuals with higher levels of education are more likely to vote. In 2016, 52% of the population with less than a high school diploma reported voting, whereas the rate was 75% among those with advanced degrees.

Are there differences in voting rates between male and female college students?

Yes, female college students tend to vote at higher rates than male college students. The NSLVE found that 42.1% of female students voted in the 2018 midterms compared to 36.8% of male students.

What issues are most important to college voters?

According to various polls, key issues for college voters can include education (including student loans and cost of education), healthcare, climate change, economy, and civil rights. However, these priorities can vary greatly depending on the person's individual circumstances and beliefs.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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