GITNUX REPORT 2024

Black Male Education: Disparities in Graduation and Academic Achievement

Underreported crisis: Black male academic disparities persist despite systemic challenges in U.S. education system.

Author: Jannik Lindner

First published: 7/17/2024

Statistic 1

Only 16% of Black male students are proficient in reading by 8th grade.

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Only 12% of Black male 4th graders are proficient in math.

Statistic 3

Only 4% of Black male students are enrolled in gifted and talented programs.

Statistic 4

Only 11% of Black male 8th graders are proficient in science.

Statistic 5

Black males represent only 4% of students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses.

Statistic 6

Black male students are 3.5 times more likely to be held back a grade than White male students.

Statistic 7

Only 6% of Black male students take calculus in high school, compared to 18% of White male students.

Statistic 8

Only 15% of Black male students are enrolled in at least one Advanced Placement course.

Statistic 9

Only 13% of Black male 4th graders are proficient in reading.

Statistic 10

Black male students represent only 3% of students enrolled in gifted programs nationwide.

Statistic 11

Only 18% of Black male students take physics in high school, compared to 31% of White male students.

Statistic 12

Only 22% of Black male students are enrolled in at least one dual enrollment course in high school.

Statistic 13

Only 7% of Black male students score at or above proficient on the 12th grade NAEP mathematics assessment.

Statistic 14

Only 32% of Black male students take chemistry in high school, compared to 48% of White male students.

Statistic 15

Only 9% of Black male students score at or above proficient on the 12th grade NAEP reading assessment.

Statistic 16

Only 14% of Black male students are enrolled in algebra I by 8th grade, compared to 34% of White male students.

Statistic 17

Only 19% of Black male students take a foreign language for at least 3 years in high school.

Statistic 18

Only 23% of Black male students have taken a computer science course by the end of high school.

Statistic 19

Only 11% of Black male students are enrolled in International Baccalaureate programs.

Statistic 20

Only 27% of Black male students have taken a statistics course by the end of high school.

Statistic 21

Only 8% of Black male students score a 3 or higher on at least one AP exam.

Statistic 22

Only 31% of Black male students have taken a course in economics by the end of high school.

Statistic 23

Only 16% of Black male students have taken an engineering course by the end of high school.

Statistic 24

Only 22% of Black male students have participated in a work-based learning experience by the end of high school.

Statistic 25

Only 13% of Black male students have taken an environmental science course by the end of high school.

Statistic 26

Only 18% of Black male students have taken a course in personal finance by the end of high school.

Statistic 27

Only 9% of Black male students have taken an advanced mathematics course beyond Algebra II by the end of 11th grade.

Statistic 28

Only 24% of Black male students have taken a course in computer programming by the end of high school.

Statistic 29

Only 7% of Black male students have participated in an internship program by the end of high school.

Statistic 30

Black males are 2.5 times more likely to be suspended from school than White males.

Statistic 31

Black male students are 3 times more likely to be expelled from school than White male students.

Statistic 32

Black males make up 15% of the total K-12 student population but account for 35% of students suspended once.

Statistic 33

Black male students are 2.3 times more likely to be referred to law enforcement or subject to school-related arrest than White male students.

Statistic 34

Black male students are 2.7 times more likely to be corporally punished than White male students.

Statistic 35

Black male students are 2.8 times more likely to be referred to alternative schools than White male students.

Statistic 36

37% of Black male students attend high-poverty schools, compared to 6% of White male students.

Statistic 37

Only 57% of Black male students have access to the full range of math and science courses in high school.

Statistic 38

Black male students are 1.9 times more likely to be placed in special education programs than the national average.

Statistic 39

Black male students are 1.8 times more likely to be identified as having a learning disability than White male students.

Statistic 40

Black male students are 1.5 times less likely to participate in school-sponsored extracurricular activities than White male students.

Statistic 41

Black male students are 2.4 times more likely to be diagnosed with an emotional disturbance than White male students.

Statistic 42

Black male students are 1.6 times less likely to have access to high-speed internet at home compared to White male students.

Statistic 43

Black male students are 2.2 times more likely to be classified as having an intellectual disability than White male students.

Statistic 44

Black male students are 1.7 times less likely to have a parent with a bachelor's degree or higher compared to White male students.

Statistic 45

Black male students are 1.9 times more likely to attend a high school that does not offer calculus.

Statistic 46

Black male students are 1.4 times less likely to participate in school music or performing arts programs than White male students.

Statistic 47

Black male students are 2.6 times more likely to be chronically absent from school than White male students.

Statistic 48

Black male students are 1.8 times less likely to have access to a school counselor than White male students.

Statistic 49

Black male students are 2.3 times more likely to attend a school with a school resource officer but no counselor.

Statistic 50

Black male students are 1.5 times less likely to participate in school-sponsored academic clubs than White male students.

Statistic 51

Black male students are 2.1 times more likely to attend a school where more than 20% of teachers are in their first year of teaching.

Statistic 52

Black male students are 1.7 times less likely to have access to a full-time school librarian than White male students.

Statistic 53

Black male students are 2.4 times more likely to attend a school where more than half of the teachers are absent for more than 10 days a year.

Statistic 54

Black male students are 1.9 times less likely to have access to a full range of science laboratory equipment in their schools.

Statistic 55

Black male students are 2.2 times more likely to attend a school where more than 25% of classes are taught by teachers without appropriate certification.

Statistic 56

Black male students are 1.6 times less likely to have access to a school psychologist than White male students.

Statistic 57

Black male students are 2.5 times more likely to attend a school where more than 50% of students are chronically absent.

Statistic 58

Black male students are 1.8 times less likely to have access to a full-time school nurse than White male students.

Statistic 59

Only 54% of Black male students graduate from high school in four years, compared to 75% of White male students.

Statistic 60

Only 28% of Black male students complete a college preparatory curriculum in high school.

Statistic 61

Black male students are 2.1 times more likely to drop out of high school than White male students.

Statistic 62

Only 41% of Black male students have taken the SAT or ACT by the end of high school.

Statistic 63

Only 34% of Black males who enroll in a four-year college graduate within six years.

Statistic 64

Only 38% of Black male students who start at a community college complete a degree or certificate within 6 years.

Statistic 65

Black males represent only 2% of the teacher workforce in the United States.

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Summary

  • Only 54% of Black male students graduate from high school in four years, compared to 75% of White male students.
  • Black males are 2.5 times more likely to be suspended from school than White males.
  • Only 16% of Black male students are proficient in reading by 8th grade.
  • Black males represent only 2% of the teacher workforce in the United States.
  • 37% of Black male students attend high-poverty schools, compared to 6% of White male students.
  • Black male students are 3 times more likely to be expelled from school than White male students.
  • Only 12% of Black male 4th graders are proficient in math.
  • Black males make up 15% of the total K-12 student population but account for 35% of students suspended once.
  • Only 57% of Black male students have access to the full range of math and science courses in high school.
  • Black male students are 1.9 times more likely to be placed in special education programs than the national average.
  • Only 4% of Black male students are enrolled in gifted and talented programs.
  • Black male students are 2.3 times more likely to be referred to law enforcement or subject to school-related arrest than White male students.
  • Only 11% of Black male 8th graders are proficient in science.
  • Black males represent only 4% of students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses.
  • Only 34% of Black males who enroll in a four-year college graduate within six years.

Breaking the Mold: The Unfortunate Reality of Black Male Education in America – from being more likely to be suspended, less likely to have access to educational resources, and facing disproportionate challenges at every turn, the statistics paint a grim picture of the educational landscape for Black male students in the U.S. Its time to shine a light on these stark disparities and work towards a more equitable future where every child has a fair chance to succeed.

Academic Performance

  • Only 16% of Black male students are proficient in reading by 8th grade.
  • Only 12% of Black male 4th graders are proficient in math.
  • Only 4% of Black male students are enrolled in gifted and talented programs.
  • Only 11% of Black male 8th graders are proficient in science.
  • Black males represent only 4% of students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses.
  • Black male students are 3.5 times more likely to be held back a grade than White male students.
  • Only 6% of Black male students take calculus in high school, compared to 18% of White male students.
  • Only 15% of Black male students are enrolled in at least one Advanced Placement course.
  • Only 13% of Black male 4th graders are proficient in reading.
  • Black male students represent only 3% of students enrolled in gifted programs nationwide.
  • Only 18% of Black male students take physics in high school, compared to 31% of White male students.
  • Only 22% of Black male students are enrolled in at least one dual enrollment course in high school.
  • Only 7% of Black male students score at or above proficient on the 12th grade NAEP mathematics assessment.
  • Only 32% of Black male students take chemistry in high school, compared to 48% of White male students.
  • Only 9% of Black male students score at or above proficient on the 12th grade NAEP reading assessment.
  • Only 14% of Black male students are enrolled in algebra I by 8th grade, compared to 34% of White male students.
  • Only 19% of Black male students take a foreign language for at least 3 years in high school.
  • Only 23% of Black male students have taken a computer science course by the end of high school.
  • Only 11% of Black male students are enrolled in International Baccalaureate programs.
  • Only 27% of Black male students have taken a statistics course by the end of high school.
  • Only 8% of Black male students score a 3 or higher on at least one AP exam.
  • Only 31% of Black male students have taken a course in economics by the end of high school.
  • Only 16% of Black male students have taken an engineering course by the end of high school.
  • Only 22% of Black male students have participated in a work-based learning experience by the end of high school.
  • Only 13% of Black male students have taken an environmental science course by the end of high school.
  • Only 18% of Black male students have taken a course in personal finance by the end of high school.
  • Only 9% of Black male students have taken an advanced mathematics course beyond Algebra II by the end of 11th grade.
  • Only 24% of Black male students have taken a course in computer programming by the end of high school.
  • Only 7% of Black male students have participated in an internship program by the end of high school.

Interpretation

In a world where proficiency is the currency of success, Black male students seem to be handed a dismal set of statistics as their bank statement. With only single-digit percentages representing their achievements in various academic areas, it's clear that the education system isn't just failing some students but actively excluding others. The numbers speak volumes about a system that is meant to elevate and empower all, yet seems to be systematically shackling the potential of Black boys. It's time to stop viewing these statistics as mere data points and start recognizing them as urgent calls to action for a more equitable and inclusive educational landscape. After all, intelligence knows no color, so why should opportunity?

Disciplinary Actions

  • Black males are 2.5 times more likely to be suspended from school than White males.
  • Black male students are 3 times more likely to be expelled from school than White male students.
  • Black males make up 15% of the total K-12 student population but account for 35% of students suspended once.
  • Black male students are 2.3 times more likely to be referred to law enforcement or subject to school-related arrest than White male students.
  • Black male students are 2.7 times more likely to be corporally punished than White male students.
  • Black male students are 2.8 times more likely to be referred to alternative schools than White male students.

Interpretation

Despite being only 15% of the student population, Black males seem to be leading the charge in the world of school infractions, taking the phrase "breaking records" a bit too literally. Whether it's getting suspended, expelled, referred to law enforcement, or taking a detour to an alternative school, it seems like the education system has created a fast lane specifically for them. With numbers this high, one might wonder if the school hallways have become a secret society, of which Black males unwittingly hold memberships. These statistics don't just point out disparities; they scream for a systemic change that acknowledges and addresses the underlying issues at play, because at this rate, Black males might end up with more "school achievements" than actual diplomas.

Educational Environment

  • 37% of Black male students attend high-poverty schools, compared to 6% of White male students.
  • Only 57% of Black male students have access to the full range of math and science courses in high school.
  • Black male students are 1.9 times more likely to be placed in special education programs than the national average.
  • Black male students are 1.8 times more likely to be identified as having a learning disability than White male students.
  • Black male students are 1.5 times less likely to participate in school-sponsored extracurricular activities than White male students.
  • Black male students are 2.4 times more likely to be diagnosed with an emotional disturbance than White male students.
  • Black male students are 1.6 times less likely to have access to high-speed internet at home compared to White male students.
  • Black male students are 2.2 times more likely to be classified as having an intellectual disability than White male students.
  • Black male students are 1.7 times less likely to have a parent with a bachelor's degree or higher compared to White male students.
  • Black male students are 1.9 times more likely to attend a high school that does not offer calculus.
  • Black male students are 1.4 times less likely to participate in school music or performing arts programs than White male students.
  • Black male students are 2.6 times more likely to be chronically absent from school than White male students.
  • Black male students are 1.8 times less likely to have access to a school counselor than White male students.
  • Black male students are 2.3 times more likely to attend a school with a school resource officer but no counselor.
  • Black male students are 1.5 times less likely to participate in school-sponsored academic clubs than White male students.
  • Black male students are 2.1 times more likely to attend a school where more than 20% of teachers are in their first year of teaching.
  • Black male students are 1.7 times less likely to have access to a full-time school librarian than White male students.
  • Black male students are 2.4 times more likely to attend a school where more than half of the teachers are absent for more than 10 days a year.
  • Black male students are 1.9 times less likely to have access to a full range of science laboratory equipment in their schools.
  • Black male students are 2.2 times more likely to attend a school where more than 25% of classes are taught by teachers without appropriate certification.
  • Black male students are 1.6 times less likely to have access to a school psychologist than White male students.
  • Black male students are 2.5 times more likely to attend a school where more than 50% of students are chronically absent.
  • Black male students are 1.8 times less likely to have access to a full-time school nurse than White male students.

Interpretation

In a world where statistics paint a troubling picture, the disparities faced by Black male students in education are not merely numbers on a page, but a stark reflection of systemic inequities. From the lack of access to crucial resources like high-speed internet and experienced teachers, to the disproportionate placement in special education programs, these figures tell a story of obstacles stacked against success. It's clear that the education system must do more than just acknowledge these disparities - it must actively work to dismantle the barriers that hinder the academic and personal growth of Black male students. The road to equality is long and challenging, but it begins with a commitment to providing every student with the tools and opportunities needed to thrive, regardless of the color of their skin.

High School Graduation

  • Only 54% of Black male students graduate from high school in four years, compared to 75% of White male students.
  • Only 28% of Black male students complete a college preparatory curriculum in high school.
  • Black male students are 2.1 times more likely to drop out of high school than White male students.
  • Only 41% of Black male students have taken the SAT or ACT by the end of high school.

Interpretation

These stark statistics serve as a haunting reminder that equality in education is still a distant dream for many Black male students. While these numbers may seem like mere data points to some, they represent lost potential and systemic failures that perpetuate inequality. It's time to stop sweeping these disparities under the rug and start addressing the root causes that lead to such glaring discrepancies. The future of our society depends on ensuring that all students, regardless of race, have the same opportunities to succeed and thrive.

Higher Education

  • Only 34% of Black males who enroll in a four-year college graduate within six years.
  • Only 38% of Black male students who start at a community college complete a degree or certificate within 6 years.

Interpretation

In a world where speed is celebrated, these statistics paint a sobering picture of the marathon that is higher education for Black male students. With only a third crossing the finish line at four-year institutions and just over a third at community colleges, the obstacles they face are not just hurdles but entire obstacle courses. Perhaps it's time we recognize that the race to success is not won by starting guns but by a system that sets up some to sprint while others are left to stumble.

Representation in Education

  • Black males represent only 2% of the teacher workforce in the United States.

Interpretation

Despite accounting for a significant portion of student enrollment, black males only make up a minuscule 2% of the teacher workforce in the United States. This statistic not only highlights a lack of representation and diversity in the education system, but also raises important questions about the barriers and challenges faced by black men pursuing careers in teaching. The underrepresentation of black male educators not only deprives students of diverse role models but also perpetuates a systemic inequality that needs to be addressed with urgency and purpose. It's time to break down these barriers and pave the way for a more inclusive and reflective education system.

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