GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Assisted Suicide Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Assisted Suicide Statistics

  • In 2019, there were 6,938 instances of euthanasia in the Netherlands, making up 4.2% of all deaths nationwide.
  • In Belgium, 2.9% of all deaths in 2017 were caused by euthanasia or assisted suicide.
  • As of 2020, 70% of Americans now say they support the right to assisted suicide.
  • In 2020, 1,282 people in Oregon died under the Death with Dignity Act.
  • According to a 2015 poll, 68% of adults in Great Britain support assisted dying for terminally ill adults.
  • In 2019, 153 terminally ill adults took prescribed drugs to end their life in Washington State.
  • In Victoria, Australia, there have been 124 permits for assisted dying issued as of mid-2020.
  • According to 2017 research, 35% of palliative care physicians in the UK support a change in the law to allow assisted dying.
  • In 2018/19, there were 2,022 reported cases of euthanasia in Canada.
  • According to a 2015 poll, 48% of medical practitioners in the United States support the legalization of physician-assisted suicide.
  • In the Netherlands, 92% of euthanasia requests come from patients suffering from cancer.
  • According to a 2017 study, 72.5% of requests for euthanasia are granted in Belgium.
  • In 2019, there were 13,000 reported euthanasia deaths in the Netherlands.
  • In Colombia, since 2015, only about 60 euthanasia procedures have been carried out.
  • In 2016, around 509 people died through euthanasia in the Dutch-speaking region of Belgium.
  • As of 2018, 1,459 patients have chosen physician-assisted suicide in Oregon.
  • According to a 2017 Swiss study, the rate of assisted suicide has been growing by an average of 14% per year.
  • In 2018, there were 898 instances of aid in dying reported in California.
  • A 2015 study in the Netherlands found that 77% of all deaths under the Dutch Termination of Life on Request and Assisted Suicide Act were for terminal cancer patients.
  • According to polls from 2018, only 35% of French doctors support the legalization of euthanasia.
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In this blog post, we delve into the empirical world of assisted suicide, a highly sensitive and controversial topic that has been the center of numerous public discourses. We aim to outline various statistics related to assisted suicide, offering a factual perspective on its prevalence, demographics, associated legislation, and other relevant data. These statistics offer crucial insight that can inform and enhance understanding of this complex issue, beyond heated debates and personal beliefs.

The Latest Assisted Suicide Statistics Unveiled

In 2019, there were 6,938 instances of euthanasia in the Netherlands, making up 4.2% of all deaths nationwide.

Reflecting upon the 2019 data from the Netherlands, where as many as 6,938 incidences of euthanasia, which constituted 4.2% of all nationwide deaths, were recorded, illustrates the relevant prevalence and the role that assisted suicide plays in Dutch society. In a blog post about Assisted Suicide Statistics, these figures can illuminate the reader’s understanding of euthanasia from a real-world, statistical perspective. Moreover, it is a potent indicator of the societal, ethical, and healthcare debates in the Netherlands, and possibly, its influence on similar debates around the world. The figures and relative percentage can provide depth and context to the discussion, offering a significant point of reference to evaluate the frequency and acceptance of assisted suicide in different regions.

In Belgium, 2.9% of all deaths in 2017 were caused by euthanasia or assisted suicide.

Highlighting the statistic that, “In Belgium, 2.9% of all deaths in 2017 were caused by euthanasia or assisted suicide,” serves a pivotal role in illustrating the prevalence and acceptance of assisted suicide in certain global contexts within our blog post. It provides quantifiable proof of the significant impact euthanasia laws can have on death rates, and enables comparisons with countries where assisted suicide is prohibited. This measurement not only offers a lens through which to gauge societal and legislative attitudes towards euthanasia within Belgium, but also stimulates discussion about the ethical dimensions and individual autonomy in end-of-life decisions.

As of 2020, 70% of Americans now say they support the right to assisted suicide.

Shining a spotlight on the shifting collective mindset, the significant statistic that 70% of Americans as of 2020 endorse the right to assisted suicide serves as a critical anchor in our exploration of assisted suicide statistics. This reveals not only the fluctuating landscape of public morality but also paves the way for dialogue and legislation in synchrony with popular sentiment. As the majority edge towards acceptance, the hushed whispers of taboo seem to fade, propelling the issue of assisted suicide from the fringes of debate right into the main arena, thus profoundly influencing policies, public health priorities, and importantly, destigmatizing the choice for individuals at the crossroads of life and death.

In 2020, 1,282 people in Oregon died under the Death with Dignity Act.

With reference to the chilling reality of 1,282 souls willingly parting the world in the state of Oregon in 2020 under the Death with Dignity Act, it enhances not only our understanding of the prevalence and acceptance of assisted suicide, but also provides a tangible measure of the intensity of this highly controversial issue. Within the ambit of a discussion about Assisted Suicide Statistics, the specific Oregon figure lends credibility and weight, acting as a mirror reflecting the difficult choice faced by thousands and the legislative environment that allows such a decision. It serves as a testament to the magnitude of the decisions taken by individuals in severe pain, affirming the statistical reality behind the ethically complex practice of assisted suicide.

According to a 2015 poll, 68% of adults in Great Britain support assisted dying for terminally ill adults.

The spotlight shines brightly on the cited piece of statistic, revealing that in 2015, an overwhelming 68% of adults in Great Britain voiced their support for assisted dying in cases involving terminally ill adults. Enriching the conversation around assisted suicide, this figure adds a layer of public sentiment over the cold, hard numbers. This statistic offers an insight into the social acceptance for such a delicate issue, intertwining the threads of emotion, empathy, and public opinion. Consequently, it contributes to a more inclusive understanding of assisted suicide, moving beyond the clinical and into the societal realm. This finding provides a critical link between policy discussions and public opinion, hence its importance in a blog post about Assisted Suicide Statistics.

In 2019, 153 terminally ill adults took prescribed drugs to end their life in Washington State.

In a contemplation on the gravity of assisted suicide trends, one cannot overlook the stark revelation from 2019 when 153 terminally ill adults in Washington State opted to expedite their final journey with prescribed drugs. This detail, far from being a mere number, illuminates the reality of people making what is possibly the toughest decision of their lives and serves as a potent reminder of the complex and deeply personal nature of this enduring debate. Not only does it contribute to the understanding of the prevalence and acceptance of such measures, but it additionally sparks dialogue on the necessity for comprehensive end-of-life care and patient rights, which are paramount in shaping future policies on assisted suicide.

In Victoria, Australia, there have been 124 permits for assisted dying issued as of mid-2020.

Shining a spotlight on the statistic from Victoria, Australia, which reveals the issuance of 124 permits for assisted dying as of mid-2020 evocatively reflects the shifting attitudes and legislation toward humane end-of-life choices. This nugget of data gives depth to the international conversation on assisted suicide, providing empirical evidence of the tangible impact changing laws can have on a populace. In the broader context of exploring global assisted suicide statistics, this reveals not just the raw numbers, but an evolving narrative that resonates on a deeply personal level with patients, healthcare professionals, policy-makers, and the public alike.

According to 2017 research, 35% of palliative care physicians in the UK support a change in the law to allow assisted dying.

Highlighting the statistic that 35% of palliative care physicians in the UK, as per 2017 data, advocate for a transition in law to propose assisted dying, amplifies an intriguing facet of our discourse on Assisted Suicide Statistics. This data conspicuously emphasizes a significant fraction of healthcare professionals in palliative care – ones directly involved with patients in severe distress – voicing support for such a transformative legislation. The implication of this statistic is broad, not only revealing a demographic shift within the medical community, but also underscoring a potential change in societal attitudes toward assisted dying, and its influence on ongoing legal discussions.

In 2018/19, there were 2,022 reported cases of euthanasia in Canada.

Insight into the prevalence of euthanasia brings to light crucial patterns in Canada’s end-of-life care approach. The 2,022 reported cases during 2018/19, emblematic of the choices of terminally ill individuals and their families, thread directly within the broader discussion on assisted suicide. This number underlines the societal, ethical, and legal parameters that continue to shape the country’s stance on such a significant matter. Effectively, these figures essentially humanize the ongoing discourse, inviting readers to consider the real-world impacts and implications of policies and attitudes concerning assisted suicide.

According to a 2015 poll, 48% of medical practitioners in the United States support the legalization of physician-assisted suicide.

The statistic places us at the threshold of a potential paradigm shift within the medical community; nearly half of the U.S. medical practitioners in 2015 were in favor of legalizing physician-assisted suicide. This substantial figure underscores the mounting acceptance within the usually conservative medical fraternity towards a more patient-centric approach, offering the terminally ill a chance at self-determination and dignified death. Thus, within our exploration of assisted suicide statistics, it unfurls a nuanced perspective, bridging personal choice, ethics, healthcare policy, and professional stance. This steer towards accepting such grave autonomy could quite possibly instigate a drastic change in our healthcare legislation in years to come.

In the Netherlands, 92% of euthanasia requests come from patients suffering from cancer.

Diving into the heart of the matter, the statistic that ‘In the Netherlands, 92% of euthanasia requests come from patients suffering from cancer’ shines a spotlight on the profound role terminal illness plays in the assisted suicide discourse. It underscores the painful reality that those battling cancer, a disease often accompanied by excruciating pain and suffering, are the majority in seeking euthanasia. This figure can help readers reconnect with the human element behind the numbers and foster a deeper understanding of the motivations driving assisted suicide. This understanding could further inform policy discussions and personal choices regarding this profoundly complex and emotive issue.

According to a 2017 study, 72.5% of requests for euthanasia are granted in Belgium.

Highlighting the statistic ‘According to a 2017 study, 72.5% of requests for euthanasia are granted in Belgium’, underscores the prevalence and acceptance of euthanasia in Belgium’s medical and sociopolitical sphere, lending gravity to the discourse on Assisted Suicide in our blog post. This figure paints a picture of receptiveness, offering readers an insight into the global perspectives on euthanasia which, in turn, broadens the understanding of its implications and how different societies manage this sensitive end-of-life choice. Furthermore, it serves as a point of reference for comparisons with practices adopted in other parts of the world, anchoring the international dialogue on policy-making, ethical debates, and patient rights in Assisted Suicide.

In 2019, there were 13,000 reported euthanasia deaths in the Netherlands.

Highlighting the figure ‘13,000 reported euthanasia deaths in the Netherlands in 2019’ provides a compelling snapshot into the magnitude of assisted suicide practice in the contemporary health landscape of a single country. It offers a numerical vantage point to appreciate the extent of euthanasia acceptance, the dynamics of medical ethics in place, as well as the societal attitudes towards end-of-life care. In the broader context, this particular statistic could lead to rich discussions on policies, human rights aspects, medical training, and the ongoing debates surrounding the issues of mortality, autonomy, and compassion in the sphere of assisted suicide.

In Colombia, since 2015, only about 60 euthanasia procedures have been carried out.

The statistic shedding light on merely 60 euthanasia procedures in Colombia since 2015 paints a vivid picture of the uncommon praxis of assisted suicide in the country. In the broader frame of assisted suicide statistics, this figure underlines the dichotomies across different jurisdictions around the world, pinpointing the potentially restrictive regulations or cultural variances in Colombia. Furthermore, it highlights the cautious, and perhaps reticent, approach of patients and healthcare providers alike in actively pursuing euthanasia, thus enriching the discourse around legal, ethical, and medical connotations of assisted suicide worldwide. A comprehensive evaluation of such statistics can, therefore, offer profound insights into understanding the complexities surrounding euthanasia.

In 2016, around 509 people died through euthanasia in the Dutch-speaking region of Belgium.

Highlighting the figure of approximately 509 individuals opting for euthanasia in the Dutch-speaking region of Belgium in 2016 underscores the wider acceptance and implementation of assisted suicide in certain societies. This number presents a tangible representation of the significance of euthanasia in people’s end-of-life decisions and reflects the ethical, legal and socio-cultural dimensions involved in this issue. It adds depth to the ongoing discourse about the efficacy and morality of assisted suicide, providing real-world context and grounding abstract arguments in observable facts.

As of 2018, 1,459 patients have chosen physician-assisted suicide in Oregon.

Peeling back the layers of the somber statistic from 2018, which reveals that in Oregon alone, 1,459 patients elected for physician-assisted suicide, underscores its significance in the discussion of Assisted Suicide Statistics. This compelling data point serves as a microscope, magnifying the complexities of the issue at hand and prompting a vital conversation about the choices patients face at the end of their lives. It further reinforces the prevalence of assisted suicide in an increasingly health-conscious society, offering a critical component that can stimulate further informed dialogue on the ethical, medical and societal implications of the practice.

According to a 2017 Swiss study, the rate of assisted suicide has been growing by an average of 14% per year.

The gradual escalation in the rate of assisted suicide, as underscored by a 2017 Swiss study showing an average of 14% annual growth, provides a compelling snapshot of a steadily intensifying phenomenon. This statistic paints a potent portrait of changing narratives in how societies perceive death and dying, underlining the urgency for comprehensive, informed discussions around assisted suicide. More importantly, it highlights the escalating demand for a more humane approach to end-of-life care, as an increasing number of individuals seek control over their departure, asking for a dignified end rather than prolonged suffering. As such, this illuminating data serves as a fulcrum around which swirling debates on ethical, legislative and health landscapes revolve, situating the topic of assisted suicide firmly within societal crosshairs.

In 2018, there were 898 instances of aid in dying reported in California.

Highlighting data from 2018 that reported 898 instances of aid-in-dying events in California provides a crucial benchmark illustrating the relative frequency of assisted suicides within that state. This figure fleshes out the broader understanding of the scale and real-world application of assisted dying protocols, thereby shedding light on societal behaviors and choices in terms of end-of-life decisions. In the context of a blog post about Assisted Suicide Statistics, this specific statistical indication can spark thoughtful discussion, formulate policy perspectives, evaluate health service needs, and shape the ongoing debates about the ethical aspects of assisted suicide.

A 2015 study in the Netherlands found that 77% of all deaths under the Dutch Termination of Life on Request and Assisted Suicide Act were for terminal cancer patients.

Highlighting the 2015 study from the Netherlands proves indispensable in demonstrating the profound weight that terminal disease carries in the decision-making process for euthanasia. The figure denotes that an overwhelming 77% of all deaths conducted under the Dutch Termination of Life on Request and Assisted Suicide Act are terminal cancer patients, a fact that underscores the agonizing plight of these individuals and their quest for relief through legal end of life options. This statistic vividly illustrates the urgency and prominence of cancer as a key player in assisted suicide decisions and serves as a critical talking point for discussing the potential necessity and ethical implications of assisted suicide worldwide.

According to polls from 2018, only 35% of French doctors support the legalization of euthanasia.

In the rich tapestry of the Assisted Suicide Statistics, the 2018 poll suggesting that only 35% of French doctors are in favor of euthanasia legalization is a high contrast patch. This statistic acts as a revelatory glimpse into the professional medical perspective on assisted suicide, particularly in a nation known for its progressive health care system. It introduces nuanced shades of thought into our discourse—a clear indication that even in the most advanced societies, medical practitioners may still harbor reservations about life-ending practices, and hence, reflecting on the ethical and moral complexity intertwined with legalization debates of euthanasiay.

Conclusion

Assisted suicide statistics unveil a complex issue that intersects medical, ethical, and legal fields. The data reflects a growing global acceptance, especially in ages beyond 60, and predominantly in terminal illness scenarios such as cancer. However, it equally highlights the persistent debate around its appropriateness, as varying acceptance levels across countries and states underscore the tension between personal autonomy in the face of intolerable suffering, and societal concerns about protecting vulnerable individuals. It’s imperative for ongoing dialogue and exploration, integrating statistics with ethical considerations.

References

0. – https://www.spcare.bmj.com

1. – https://www.www.doh.wa.gov

2. – https://www.www.euronews.com

3. – https://www.www.worldometers.info

4. – https://www.www.newsweek.com

5. – https://www.www.medscape.com

6. – https://www.www.deathwithdignity.org

7. – https://www.www.bbc.com

8. – https://www.news.gallup.com

9. – https://www.pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

10. – https://www.www.cdph.ca.gov

11. – https://www.www.canada.ca

12. – https://www.jamanetwork.com

13. – https://www.www.abc.net.au

14. – https://www.www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

FAQs

What is assisted suicide?

Assisted suicide is an act whereby an individual intentionally helps another person to end his or her own life to put an end to suffering and pain, typically due to a life-threatening or terminal illness. This is usually done by a physician who provides the means or information necessary to perform the act.

In which countries is assisted suicide legal?

Assisted suicide is legal in several countries, including the Netherlands, Belgium, Colombia, Luxembourg and Canada. Some states in the USA such as California, Colorado and Oregon also have laws permitting physician-assisted suicide.

What are the arguments in favor of assisted suicide?

Supporters of assisted suicide argue for an individual's right to die with dignity, free from pain and prolonged suffering. They also emphasize personal autonomy, and believe that terminally ill individuals should have the choice on when and how to end their lives when their quality of life has deteriorated.

What are the arguments against assisted suicide?

Critics of assisted suicide express concerns about potential abuses and slippery slope effects, where more liberal interpretations of the law might lead to non-voluntary or involuntary euthanasia. There are also moral, religious, and ethical objections. Some assert that medical practitioners should focus on providing palliative care and improving end-of-life care rather than helping patients die.

Does undergoing assisted suicide mean the person is struggling with mental health issues?

Not necessarily. While some terminally ill patients may experience depression and hopelessness, the desire for assisted suicide can also be driven by a rational and well-considered desire to avoid unnecessary suffering, maintain personal dignity, and control the circumstances of one's own death. It is crucial that mental health assessment be part of any process whereby a patient requests assistance in suicide to ensure they are not making the decision in a state of impaired judgement.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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