GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Women Vote Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Women Vote Statistics

  • Approximately 76.8% of eligible women voters cast their vote in the 2020 New Zealand general elections.
  • In India, female voter turnout was higher than male voter turnout in over half the states in the 2019 general elections.
  • Women in Saudi Arabia were only given the right to vote and run for office in 2015.
  • In the 2016 presidential election, 63.3% of eligible women voted, compared to 59.3% of men.
  • In the UK, men and women have been voting at similar rates, with women slightly outnumbering men at 69% to 68% in the 2017 general elections.
  • In Iceland, women made up more than 59.5% of voters in the 2021 parliamentary elections.
  • In the 2019 Australian federal election, the voter turnout for women was around 92%.
  • In Germany, women gained the right to vote on January 19, 1919.
  • Women represent only 39.4% of all members of the European parliament elected in 2019.
  • As of June 2021, only three countries in the world do not allow women to vote.
  • In Chinese parliamentary elections 2017, female voter turnout was reported to be equal to male voter turnout.
  • In Canada, women were given the right to vote in federal elections in 1918.

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In this blog post, we dive into the fascinating world of women’s suffrage and participation in the electoral process through the lens of modern statistics. The journey of women’s involvement, from gaining the right to vote to their contemporary trends in voting, provides a compelling narrative across different regions, cultures, and socio-economic conditions. Our exploration not only charts the history and impact women have had on politics, but also the incredible strides they continue to make, eventually influencing the trajectory of gender equality worldwide. Unveiling these insights through concrete numbers, we offer you a comprehensive picture of women vote statistics.

The Latest Women Vote Statistics Unveiled

Approximately 76.8% of eligible women voters cast their vote in the 2020 New Zealand general elections.

Highlighting the statistic that approximately 76.8% of eligible women voters exercised their right to vote in the 2020 New Zealand general elections presents an insightful panorama of female political engagement. Its main thrust speaks to the impressive and consequential level of female electoral participation, reaffirming the increasing influence women have within democratic processes. Weaving this data into a blog post on Women Vote Statistics not only exemplifies a significant trend of feminine political involvement, but it reinforces the discourse on the crucial role women play in shaping political landscapes, igniting debates about gender equality in politics, and redefining societal norms.

In India, female voter turnout was higher than male voter turnout in over half the states in the 2019 general elections.

Highlighting the heightened female voter turnout in over half the states in India during the 2019 general elections underscores the surging trend of political participation among women- a demographic historically underrepresented. Such a dynamic shift, where women outnumber men in exercising their franchise, is not just a testament to the increasing voter awareness and empowerment among the female population, but it also indicates a potential change in the electoral dynamics. With women making their presence known at polling booths, political parties and policymakers might be compelled to focus more on women-centric policies. Hence, this statistic serves as a robust cornerstone in the narrative of women’s growing political engagement in a blog post about Women Vote Statistics.

Women in Saudi Arabia were only given the right to vote and run for office in 2015.

Highlighting the statistic that women in Saudi Arabia were granted the right to vote and run for office only as recently as 2015 offers a stark illustration of the global disparities in women’s voting rights. Within the canvas of a blog post about women’s vote statistics, this figure places into context the ongoing struggle for gender equality in the political sphere. Especially, when looked at from a contemporary lens where most of the world has seen women’s suffrage for the better part of the last century, the progress made by Saudi Arabian women underscores the need for continued advocacy for women’s rights worldwide.

In the 2016 presidential election, 63.3% of eligible women voted, compared to 59.3% of men.

Illuminating the gender dynamics of electoral participation, the statistic elucidates a decisive tilt in the 2016 presidential election. The higher turnout of 63.3% among eligible female voters, compared to 59.3% of their male counterparts, subtly underscores the growing political engagement and influence of women in shaping the national discourse. This represents not just a numerical edge, but a potent socio-political statement, and sets the stage for exploring how increased female participation could potentially influence political platforms, public policies, and electoral outcomes in the context of our blog post on Women Vote Statistics.

In the UK, men and women have been voting at similar rates, with women slightly outnumbering men at 69% to 68% in the 2017 general elections.

Peering into these numbers offers illuminating insights into the budding gender dynamics in electoral participation in the United Kingdom. With women tipping the scales at 69% against the men’s 68% in the 2017 general elections, it’s clear that women’s voices are not just being heard, but they’re resonating in the political sphere. Their active involvement in voting reflects the breaking of traditional stereotypes and the progress of gender equality, signifying that women are increasingly playing a dominant role in shaping the political terrain of the country. Such a participation pattern provides a critical benchmark in exploring gender-based voting behaviours, and undoubtedly serves as a pivotal cornerstone in the conversation surrounding Women Vote Statistics.

In Iceland, women made up more than 59.5% of voters in the 2021 parliamentary elections.

Diving into the fascinating realm of Women Vote Statistics, one cannot ignore the striking example of Iceland’s 2021 parliamentary elections. With a staggering 59.5% of voters being women, this number is an emphatic testament to the evolving power and participation of women in democratic processes. This statistic not only underscores the increasing gender equality in electoral demonstrations, but also spotlights Iceland as a beacon of female political engagement. It paints a picture of a society where more women are actively shaping their country’s future, thereby nurturing a balance of perspectives and approaches that strengthens the democratic fabric. It equally serves as a benchmark for other nations in the quest for robust female electoral participation and representation.

In the 2019 Australian federal election, the voter turnout for women was around 92%.

In delving into the realm of Women Vote Statistics, the pivotal role of the 92% turnout for women in the 2019 Australian federal election cannot be understated. This figure adroitly captures the extent of women’s participation in the democratic process, asserting a potent sign of their societal engagement, self-agency, and influence on policy-making. It’s a testament to the progress made towards gender equality in the political sphere. Furthermore, it sets a compelling benchmark for future elections, raising pertinent questions about how to maintain or even increase this rate, and what factors might contribute to the changes. This statistic serves as a cornerstone in the blog post’s larger narrative, shedding light on the landscape of women’s political participation in Australia.

In Germany, women gained the right to vote on January 19, 1919.

Highlighting the statistic of German women acquiring voting rights on January 19, 1919, provides a significant juncture in the timeline of women’s suffrage, not only in the context of Germany but globally as well. By contrasting this crucial milestone with other nations, we can trace the progression of women’s political empowerment and measure the pace of change. In a sense, referencing this historic event demonstrates the evolution of women’s rights, offering insightful context and perspective on the struggle for equality. Such a statute signifies the starting point for further comparison and analysis within the blog post, while also underscoring the significance of women participating in electoral processes.

Women represent only 39.4% of all members of the European parliament elected in 2019.

Highlighting that women represent only 39.4% of all European parliament members elected in 2019 is pivotal in a blog post about Women Vote Statistics. It underscores the ongoing gap in political representation between genders, despite women making up roughly half of the population. This discrepancy provides a significant discussion point for examining barriers women face in politics. The statistic also serves as a benchmark, stimulating conversations on measures to be taken towards boosting female representation, in turn aligning with the principle of gender equality that is fundamental in democratic societies.

As of June 2021, only three countries in the world do not allow women to vote.

Highlighting the reality that, as of June 2021, there remain three countries in the world still denying voting rights to women, serves as a stark contrast to the strides made elsewhere in acknowledging women’s suffrage. Within a blog post about Women Vote Statistics, it underscores the persistent inequities and systemic obstacles that women face globally, while spotlighting the importance of universal suffrage. Equally, it provides a metric that fosters discourse, critical thought, and awareness regarding the gender disparities inherent in these political systems, serving as a call to action towards global voter equality.

In Chinese parliamentary elections 2017, female voter turnout was reported to be equal to male voter turnout.

Shedding light on the emancipation strides in Chinese parliamentary elections 2017, an interesting trend emerges where the female voter turnout echoed that of the males. This statistic sets a powerful precedent, illustrating how women in China are exercising their right to vote, thus wielding influence over governmental decisions. In a blog post about Women Vote Statistics, this demonstrates the progress in gender equality, and the growing political empowerment of women in a country rich in tradition and history. It paints a picture of a modern China where civic responsibilities and empowerment are echoed across the gender spectrum.

In Canada, women were given the right to vote in federal elections in 1918.

Spotlighting the milestone of Canadian women attaining voting rights in federal elections in 1918 provides an essential narrative pivot in any discourse tackling Women Vote Statistics. It underlines not only the historic triumphs in female suffrage, but it also presents a tangible distinction to quantify and analyze women’s political participation over a century. Understanding this pioneering moment helps readers to comprehend the progress made, hurdles overcome, and challenges that persist. It lays the foundation for an in-depth statistical exploration of women’s voting trends, turnout, and impact, from past to present. So, this statistic serves as a powerful reference point in the evolving saga of women’s political empowerment.

Conclusion

It is evident from the exploration of women’s voting statistics that women’s role in the electoral system is significant and growing. Their increasing turnout, along with their high propensity to vote when compared to men, can greatly influence the direction of policy and the political climate. As societal norms continue to evolve, and as the voting power of women continues to be harnessed, it is anticipated that women will play an even more pivotal role in future elections.

References

0. – https://www.www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca

1. – https://www.www.aec.gov.au

2. – https://www.www.census.gov

3. – https://www.www.sixthtone.com

4. – https://www.www.ifs.org.uk

5. – https://www.www.dw.com

6. – https://www.www.europarl.europa.eu

7. – https://www.www.stats.govt.nz

8. – https://www.www.statista.com

9. – https://www.www.reuters.com

10. – https://www.www.bbc.com

11. – https://www.www.womenshistory.org

FAQs

When were women first allowed to vote in the United States?

Women were first allowed to vote legally in the United States in 1920 with the passage of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution.

Is there a gender gap in voter turnout between men and women?

Yes, there can be a gender gap in voter turnout. In many recent elections in the United States, statistics have shown that women's voter turnout has been higher than men's.

Are there significant differences in political preferences between men and women?

Yes, research often indicates gender differences in political preferences. However, it's important to note that these differences can be influenced by various factors including age, race, education, and individual issues.

How does women's voting behavior vary by racial and ethnic group?

Voting behavior can greatly vary among women of different racial and ethnic groups due to a variety of social, economic, and political factors. For example, In the 2020 U.S. election, a higher percentage of black women voted for the Democratic candidate compared to white women.

How does women's voting behavior vary by age?

Just like with racial and ethnic groups, voting behavior also varies among different age groups. Younger women tend to lean more towards Democratic candidates, while older women are slightly more likely to vote for Republican candidates. However, these trends are not absolute and can shift with changing political climates.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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