GITNUX REPORT 2024

Women in Physics: Underrepresentation Across the Globe Revealed by Statistics

Women face persistent underrepresentation in physics globally, with disparities across academia and research highlighted.

Author: Jannik Lindner

First published: 7/17/2024

Statistic 1

Only 3 women have won the Nobel Prize in Physics out of 216 laureates

Statistic 2

Only 12% of named physics awards have been given to women

Statistic 3

Only 9% of physics Nobel Prize nominations have been for women

Statistic 4

Only 20% of physics bachelor's degrees in the US are earned by women

Statistic 5

In 2019, women earned 21% of physics PhDs awarded in the US

Statistic 6

In the UK, only 22% of A-level physics students are girls

Statistic 7

In India, women make up about 30% of physics PhD students

Statistic 8

In Canada, women earn 23% of undergraduate physics degrees

Statistic 9

Only 10% of physics textbook authors are women

Statistic 10

In Brazil, women earn 30% of physics PhDs

Statistic 11

Women comprise 28% of physics students at the undergraduate level in Mexico

Statistic 12

Women earn 24% of physics master's degrees in the European Union

Statistic 13

Women comprise 23% of physics PhD graduates in Sweden

Statistic 14

Women earn 28% of physics bachelor's degrees in Turkey

Statistic 15

Women earn 26% of physics PhDs in Belgium

Statistic 16

Women earn 30% of physics master's degrees in Portugal

Statistic 17

Women earn 23% of physics bachelor's degrees in Finland

Statistic 18

Women earn 27% of physics PhDs in New Zealand

Statistic 19

Women make up just 16% of physics faculty in the US

Statistic 20

Only 11% of physics professors in Germany are women

Statistic 21

In 2019, women made up 19% of senior physicists in Europe

Statistic 22

Only 8% of physics professors in Japan are women

Statistic 23

Only 17% of physics faculty in top-ranked US universities are women

Statistic 24

In Australia, women represent 21% of employed physicists

Statistic 25

Only 7% of physics department chairs in the US are women

Statistic 26

Only 5% of physics professors in South Korea are women

Statistic 27

Women make up 17% of physics faculty in top Canadian universities

Statistic 28

Only 16% of physics department heads in UK universities are women

Statistic 29

Only 13% of physics professors in the Netherlands are women

Statistic 30

Only 15% of physics professors in Switzerland are women

Statistic 31

Only 12% of physics department chairs in Canadian universities are women

Statistic 32

Only 14% of physics professors in Austria are women

Statistic 33

Only 10% of physics professors in Ireland are women

Statistic 34

Women represent 13% of inventors on physics-related patents in the US

Statistic 35

Only 18% of physics patent applications in Europe include women inventors

Statistic 36

Only 11% of physics startups have women founders

Statistic 37

Only 7% of physics-related patents in Japan have women inventors

Statistic 38

Only 10% of physics-related patent applications in South Korea include women inventors

Statistic 39

Only 8% of physics startup founders in the UK are women

Statistic 40

Only 6% of physics-related patents in Germany have women as sole inventors

Statistic 41

Only 9% of physics-related startups in Israel have women founders

Statistic 42

Only 7% of physics-related patents in Taiwan have women as primary inventors

Statistic 43

Women make up 20% of members in the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics

Statistic 44

Women represent 22% of physics conference speakers globally

Statistic 45

Women make up 19% of the American Physical Society membership

Statistic 46

Only 14% of invited speakers at physics conferences in Germany are women

Statistic 47

Women make up 20% of the International Astronomical Union membership

Statistic 48

Women make up 22% of the European Physical Society individual members

Statistic 49

Women make up 18% of the American Astronomical Society membership

Statistic 50

Women make up 25% of the International Union of Crystallography membership

Statistic 51

Women make up 21% of the International Association of Mathematical Physics membership

Statistic 52

Women comprise 22% of physics authors in research papers

Statistic 53

Only 18% of authors in high-impact physics journals are women

Statistic 54

Women receive 40% fewer citations than men in physics papers

Statistic 55

Women make up 32% of physics researchers in Argentina

Statistic 56

Women receive 13% fewer grant funds than men in physics

Statistic 57

In China, women make up 25% of physics researchers

Statistic 58

Women make up 15% of physics journal editorial boards

Statistic 59

In Russia, women represent 41% of researchers in physics and astronomy

Statistic 60

In France, women represent 26% of physics researchers

Statistic 61

Women represent 25% of physics postdoctoral researchers in the US

Statistic 62

In Spain, women make up 34% of physics researchers

Statistic 63

In Italy, women represent 32% of physics researchers

Statistic 64

In Poland, women represent 29% of physics researchers

Statistic 65

In Denmark, women represent 24% of physics researchers

Statistic 66

In Norway, women represent 27% of physics researchers

Statistic 67

In Greece, women represent 33% of physics researchers

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Summary

  • Only 20% of physics bachelor's degrees in the US are earned by women
  • Women make up just 16% of physics faculty in the US
  • In 2019, women earned 21% of physics PhDs awarded in the US
  • Only 3 women have won the Nobel Prize in Physics out of 216 laureates
  • In the UK, only 22% of A-level physics students are girls
  • Women comprise 22% of physics authors in research papers
  • Only 11% of physics professors in Germany are women
  • In India, women make up about 30% of physics PhD students
  • Women represent 13% of inventors on physics-related patents in the US
  • Only 18% of authors in high-impact physics journals are women
  • In 2019, women made up 19% of senior physicists in Europe
  • Women receive 40% fewer citations than men in physics papers
  • Only 8% of physics professors in Japan are women
  • Women make up 32% of physics researchers in Argentina
  • In Canada, women earn 23% of undergraduate physics degrees

Strap on your proton pack and get ready to smash through some stubborn stereotypes because were taking a quantum leap into the world of Women in Physics! Despite the universes vast expanse of opportunities, only 20% of physics bachelors degrees in the US are earned by women, signaling a cosmic imbalance in the field. But fear not, as we navigate through black holes of statistics where women make up just 16% of physics faculty in the US and only 3 out of 216 Nobel Prize winners in Physics wear skirts, well explore how these stardust trailblazers are defying gravity and rewriting the laws of physics with their stellar contributions! Get ready for a supernova of empowerment and discovery as we delve into the galaxies of data showcasing the astronomical strides made by women in this electrifying field.

Awards and Recognition

  • Only 3 women have won the Nobel Prize in Physics out of 216 laureates
  • Only 12% of named physics awards have been given to women
  • Only 9% of physics Nobel Prize nominations have been for women

Interpretation

Despite the mind-blowing concepts and calculations that physicists deal with on a regular basis, it seems some in the field still struggle with the basic math of gender equality. With only 3 women out of 216 taking home the Nobel Prize in Physics, it's clear that the odds are not in our favor. Maybe it's time to reconfigure the algorithm and give female scientists the recognition they deserve, because let's face it: the universe doesn't care about your gender, only your brilliance.

Education

  • Only 20% of physics bachelor's degrees in the US are earned by women
  • In 2019, women earned 21% of physics PhDs awarded in the US
  • In the UK, only 22% of A-level physics students are girls
  • In India, women make up about 30% of physics PhD students
  • In Canada, women earn 23% of undergraduate physics degrees
  • Only 10% of physics textbook authors are women
  • In Brazil, women earn 30% of physics PhDs
  • Women comprise 28% of physics students at the undergraduate level in Mexico
  • Women earn 24% of physics master's degrees in the European Union
  • Women comprise 23% of physics PhD graduates in Sweden
  • Women earn 28% of physics bachelor's degrees in Turkey
  • Women earn 26% of physics PhDs in Belgium
  • Women earn 30% of physics master's degrees in Portugal
  • Women earn 23% of physics bachelor's degrees in Finland
  • Women earn 27% of physics PhDs in New Zealand

Interpretation

Despite the progress made in recent years, the gender imbalance in the field of physics remains strikingly apparent worldwide. From the US to India, Brazil to Turkey, the statistics show a consistent pattern of underrepresentation of women at various stages of their physics education and career. With only 10% of physics textbook authors being women, it's clear we still have a long way to go in achieving true gender equality in the realm of physics. As the numbers fluctuate across countries, one thing is certain - the physics world needs to break through the gender divide and embrace the full potential of all its practitioners.

Employment

  • Women make up just 16% of physics faculty in the US
  • Only 11% of physics professors in Germany are women
  • In 2019, women made up 19% of senior physicists in Europe
  • Only 8% of physics professors in Japan are women
  • Only 17% of physics faculty in top-ranked US universities are women
  • In Australia, women represent 21% of employed physicists
  • Only 7% of physics department chairs in the US are women
  • Only 5% of physics professors in South Korea are women
  • Women make up 17% of physics faculty in top Canadian universities
  • Only 16% of physics department heads in UK universities are women
  • Only 13% of physics professors in the Netherlands are women
  • Only 15% of physics professors in Switzerland are women
  • Only 12% of physics department chairs in Canadian universities are women
  • Only 14% of physics professors in Austria are women
  • Only 10% of physics professors in Ireland are women

Interpretation

Despite the universe being full of mysteries, it seems the field of physics is still struggling to unlock the secrets of gender equality. With women making up such a small percentage of physics faculty and leadership roles around the world, one might wonder if the laws of gravity also apply to gender parity. Perhaps it's time for the scientific community to conduct an experiment in inclusion and diversity, because in the grand equation of progress, women certainly deserve to be more than just a small particle in the physics world.

Innovation and Patents

  • Women represent 13% of inventors on physics-related patents in the US
  • Only 18% of physics patent applications in Europe include women inventors
  • Only 11% of physics startups have women founders
  • Only 7% of physics-related patents in Japan have women inventors
  • Only 10% of physics-related patent applications in South Korea include women inventors
  • Only 8% of physics startup founders in the UK are women
  • Only 6% of physics-related patents in Germany have women as sole inventors
  • Only 9% of physics-related startups in Israel have women founders
  • Only 7% of physics-related patents in Taiwan have women as primary inventors

Interpretation

Despite women making up a significant portion of the global population, these statistics reveal a glaring gender disparity in the field of physics and innovation. The numbers speak volumes: from underrepresentation in patent applications to the lack of female founders in physics startups, it is evident that there is much work to be done to achieve gender equality in these areas. Perhaps it's time for the world of physics to undergo its own scientific revolution – one that recognizes and empowers the brilliance of female innovators.

Professional Organizations

  • Women make up 20% of members in the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics
  • Women represent 22% of physics conference speakers globally
  • Women make up 19% of the American Physical Society membership
  • Only 14% of invited speakers at physics conferences in Germany are women
  • Women make up 20% of the International Astronomical Union membership
  • Women make up 22% of the European Physical Society individual members
  • Women make up 18% of the American Astronomical Society membership
  • Women make up 25% of the International Union of Crystallography membership
  • Women make up 21% of the International Association of Mathematical Physics membership

Interpretation

Despite their significant contributions to the field, women continue to be underrepresented in physics and related disciplines worldwide. The statistics paint a clear picture of a systemic issue that persists in these scientific communities. While progress has undeniably been made, with women comprising a notable portion of various memberships and speaker lineups, the numbers still fall far short of gender parity. It's high time for the scientific community to prioritize inclusivity and actively work towards leveling the playing field for women in physics. After all, the universe is vast and complex - shouldn't our scientific community reflect the same diversity and richness?

Research and Publications

  • Women comprise 22% of physics authors in research papers
  • Only 18% of authors in high-impact physics journals are women
  • Women receive 40% fewer citations than men in physics papers
  • Women make up 32% of physics researchers in Argentina
  • Women receive 13% fewer grant funds than men in physics
  • In China, women make up 25% of physics researchers
  • Women make up 15% of physics journal editorial boards
  • In Russia, women represent 41% of researchers in physics and astronomy
  • In France, women represent 26% of physics researchers
  • Women represent 25% of physics postdoctoral researchers in the US
  • In Spain, women make up 34% of physics researchers
  • In Italy, women represent 32% of physics researchers
  • In Poland, women represent 29% of physics researchers
  • In Denmark, women represent 24% of physics researchers
  • In Norway, women represent 27% of physics researchers
  • In Greece, women represent 33% of physics researchers

Interpretation

Despite significant progress over the years, it seems that in the field of physics, women are still fighting an uphill battle to achieve equal representation and recognition. With numbers like these, it's clear that the gender gap in physics is still as stubborn as the constant in a Newtonian equation. From receiving fewer citations and grant funds to being underrepresented in high-impact journals and editorial boards, it's evident that the scientific community still has a long way to go in leveling the playing field. Perhaps it's time for physics to redefine its laws and equations to include a more equitable and inclusive formula for success.

References