GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Whooping Cough Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Whooping Cough Statistics

  • In 2019, a total of 15,662 cases of whooping cough (pertussis) were reported to CDC.
  • Around 16 million cases of whooping cough occur globally each year.
  • Children under the age of one are most at risk- over half of infants less than 1 year old who get the disease need to be hospitalized.
  • In 2018, 151,074 cases of whooping cough were reported worldwide.
  • From January 2020 through early October, about 7,000 cases of whooping cough were reported in the US, with peak rates of the illness occurring among 13-year-olds.
  • Nearly 80% of reported whooping cough in infants is acquired from parents or family members who might not know they have the disease.
  • Around 4% of vaccinated children get whooping cough, compared with 16% of unvaccinated children.
  • Of the suspected 23.7 million of annual pertussis cases in children below 5-years-old, 144,000 result in death.
  • 92% of all newly reported whooping cough cases come from countries that had immunization coverage data.
  • There was a total of 41 deaths due to whooping cough reported in the United States between 2010 and 2014.
  • In 2008 in Australia, there were 14,392 cases of whooping cough reported, the highest in over a decade.
  • In Canada, there were 5,759 reported cases in 2016.
  • California reported over 9,000 cases of whooping cough in 2014, the highest rate of the disease since 1958.
  • Reported cases in USA ranged from 1,000 to 3,000 per year in the 1980s but jumped to an average of more than 20,000 in the first decade of this century.
  • In the pre-vaccine era (1940-1945), the incidence rate of whooping cough in the United States was 150–160 per 100,000 population.
  • In 2015, over 60% of the worldwide pertussis cases and over 70% of the related deaths occurred in children aged less than 5 years.
  • In 2019, the highest number of whooping cough cases in USA was seen in children aged 10-14 years.
  • An estimated 24.1 million cases and 160,700 deaths from whooping cough occurred globally in 2014.
  • Among 48 states and 13 local areas reporting vaccination data, 95.8% of kindergartners were vaccinated against pertussis during the 2020-21 school year.
  • The estimated global coverage with 3 doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccine was 85% in 2019.

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Examining the statistics can provide us with a revealing picture of the scope and impact of whooping cough, a highly contagious bacterial disease. It is indispensable to understand these figures to shape effective strategies for prevention and treatment. In our blog post today, we shall navigate through the sea of whooping cough statistics. We’ll delve into varying aspects including its global prevalence, age-specific cases, vaccination rates and the corresponding correlation to outbreak patterns. These data points not only display the current landscape of this disease but also provide insight into its future trend, crucial for health policymakers and medical practitioners alike.

The Latest Whooping Cough Statistics Unveiled

In 2019, a total of 15,662 cases of whooping cough (pertussis) were reported to CDC.

Illuminating the sheer magnitude of the issue, the reported statistics – 15,662 occurrences of whooping cough in 2019 alone – serve as a stark reminder of this persistent health threat. The alarmingly high figure fuels cogent discussions about preventive strategies, vaccine efficacy, and accessibility to healthcare. Reconceptualizing whooping cough from a historical affliction to a modern-day adversary, these indicators become crucial accelerators in the campaign for extended research and more robust public health measures.

Around 16 million cases of whooping cough occur globally each year.

Penetrating the veil of health maladies, the staggering number of 16 million global whooping cough cases annually elicits a significant alarm. In the universe of a blog post dedicated to Whooping Cough Statistics, this statistic serves as a poignant revelation, reinforcing the fact that whooping cough remains a severe health predicament, contrary to the common misconception of it being a disease of the past. It underscores the gravity of the situation on a global platform, using brute numbers to manifest the urgency for effective preventive strategies and health policies, while making the content more impactful and informative for the readers. It’s not just a statistic, it’s a clarion call echoing the magnitude and urgency of the issue.

Children under the age of one are most at risk- over half of infants less than 1 year old who get the disease need to be hospitalized.

Highlighting the statistical vulnerability of infants under one year old to Whooping Cough elevates the urgency of preventative measures. This crucial piece of information underscores that more than half of the afflicted in this age bracket require hospitalization – a concerning occurrence. Within a Whooping Cough Statistics blog post, it’s a sobering reminder that proactive steps—like appropriate vaccinations and prompt medical attention—are necessary. The essence of this statistic lies in its potential to steer public health strategies, stimulate more research, and motivate individuals to protect our most susceptible population.

In 2018, 151,074 cases of whooping cough were reported worldwide.

Echoing across the globe in 2018, the ominous anthem of Whooping cough rang in the ears of 151,074 individuals, wrapping the world in its suffocating grasp. Typifying much more than just a number, this statistic breathes life into the colossal effect and widespread prevalence of this relentless respirational adversary. In a blog post orbiting around Whooping Cough Statistics, this figure interweaves indispensable threads of awareness, helping delineate the enormity of the situation at an international level. An understanding of this bleak statistical landscape thereby enables us to map the combat zone, pitch prevention measures appropriately, and calibrate healthcare strategies whilst determining the gravity of the worldwide contagion.

From January 2020 through early October, about 7,000 cases of whooping cough were reported in the US, with peak rates of the illness occurring among 13-year-olds.

Emphasizing the significance of the archival data, we can’t overlook the fact that from January 2020 through early October, approximately 7,000 cases of whooping cough were reported in the United States. Furthermore, this surge was most noticeable among the 13-year-old demographic. While these figures form a crucial part of understanding the prevalence and impact of whooping cough, they also provide unique insights into the susceptibility of certain age groups. By noting these patterns, healthcare practitioners, researchers, education providers and parents, can infer the segments of the population most at risk, thus creating targeted strategies to curb the disease, be it through vaccinations, early detection measures or intensified education about the condition. Therefore, this data forms an integral crux of the larger conversation on whooping cough statistics, contributing to a broader understanding of disease patterns and preventive strategies.

Nearly 80% of reported whooping cough in infants is acquired from parents or family members who might not know they have the disease.

Diving into the wealth of Whooping Cough Statistics, one striking revelation that stands out is the understanding that parents or family members, unsuspectingly, are the source of nearly 80% of infants’ reported whooping cough. This alarming scenario not only underscores the significance of early detection and vaccination among adults but also lights a warning beacon for parents or family members who often, unknowingly, become the conduit of this highly contagious disease. This data point acts like a double-edged sword as it suggests both a potential risk and resolution, hinting at the necessity of a familial fortress of immunity to defend the most vulnerable members – our infants.

Around 4% of vaccinated children get whooping cough, compared with 16% of unvaccinated children.

Bearing testament to the power of immunization against whooping cough, the statistic of 4% prevalence in vaccinated children versus 16% in their unvaccinated counterparts emerges as a powerful anchor in our understanding of the disease’s landscape. It heralds the stark difference that vaccines make, significantly reducing the risk of children contracting the illness. In the realm of whooping cough statistics, this contrast acts as compelling evidence for the efficacy of vaccinations and paints a clear picture of the potential risks facing unvaccinated children.

Of the suspected 23.7 million of annual pertussis cases in children below 5-years-old, 144,000 result in death.

With the alarming number of 23.7 million annual pertussis (Whooping Cough) cases in children below the age of five – a figure that is larger than the entire population of some countries – the urgency and significance of the issue become unmistakably palpable. The cherry atop this chilling sundae of data, however, is the tragically high mortality rate. Notably, 144,000 of these young, vulnerable patients lose their battle with this pernicious disease. When understood in the context of this alarming ratio – the equivalent of an entire small city’s populace – we are vividly reminded how pertussis can dramatically, even fatally, impact families worldwide, shedding light on the importance of preventative measures and treatments, and making this a compelling statistic to highlight in a blog post about Whooping Cough.

92% of all newly reported whooping cough cases come from countries that had immunization coverage data.

Shining a spotlight on the striking statistic that 92% of all newly reported whooping cough cases originate from countries with accessible immunization coverage data, we uncover a riveting subplot in the narrative of Whooping Cough Statistics. This statistic has profound implications for public health policy, highlighting the latent disconnect between vaccination availability and actual immunization rates. Accompanying the startling figure is an unspoken question – how can it be that nations with accessible vaccines report such high instances of the disease? The statistic beckons us to delve into potential factors, such as public distrust, lack of education and awareness, geographical disparities or systemic failings, which might hinder vaccination efforts, thereby feeding the vicious cycle of disease propagation.

There was a total of 41 deaths due to whooping cough reported in the United States between 2010 and 2014.

In scrutinizing Whooping Cough, also known as Pertussis, the supporting data paints a vivid picture of its tangible impacts. The chilling fact that 41 lives were lost to this disease in the U.S. between 2010 and 2014 underscores the severity of the threat that whooping cough poses. This statistic not only garners attention to the earnestness of the condition but also clarifies the need for proactive health measures, like vaccinations and timely medical attention. It offers a much-needed perspective, troubling yet valuable, that further emphasizes the gravity of tens of thousands whooping cough cases in light of its potential to cause fatal harm.

In 2008 in Australia, there were 14,392 cases of whooping cough reported, the highest in over a decade.

Highlighting the surge to 14,392 reported cases of whooping cough in Australia in 2008, the most significant in over a decade, vividly illustrates the pressing nature of this public health issue. This statistic powerfully underscores the proclivity of the disease to manifest in alarming outbreaks, necessitating vigilant monitoring, proactive prevention measures, and effective healthcare responses. In the context of whooping cough statistics, this data provides stark evidence of the potential reach of the disease and the urgent need for informed awareness and effective action to combat its spread.

In Canada, there were 5,759 reported cases in 2016.

In painting a portentous picture of the whooping cough panorama in Canada, the statistic indicating 5,759 reported cases in 2016 underscores its significant magnitude. It serves as an alarming notification, elevating awareness about the disease and emphasizing the public health threat it poses. This confounding statistic impels a thorough understanding of prevention strategies and necessary health measures, turning the spotlight towards the urgency for awareness, timely vaccination, and effective public health policies.

California reported over 9,000 cases of whooping cough in 2014, the highest rate of the disease since 1958.

In the sweeping narrative of Whooping Cough Statistics, the spike in cases reported in California in 2014 stands as a stark chapter. With over 9,000 cases – a figure unparalleled since 1958 – this pivotal benchmark underscores the resurgence of the disease in a state renowned for its healthcare advancements and climatic amicability. This record-breaking statistic serves as a groundbreaking reminder that even well-controlled conditions can re-emerge, reinforcing the necessity of continued vigilance, preemptive immunization strategies and robust healthcare policies.

Reported cases in USA ranged from 1,000 to 3,000 per year in the 1980s but jumped to an average of more than 20,000 in the first decade of this century.

In the narrative of Whooping Cough statistics, the standout increase from a yearly count of 1,000 to 3,000 cases in the 1980s, up to an alarming average of over 20,000 in the first decade of the 21st century, paints a stark picture of escalating concern. This significant rise provides a wake-up call, highlighting the increased prevalence of the illness, and underscores the necessity for public health measures tailored to combat Whooping Cough. Statistics like these serve as analytical roadmaps helping us navigate the health landscape and take decisive action accordingly. While the numbers themselves cannot tell the whole story, they indeed deliver crucial insights that help guide further inquiry into the potential factors causing this surge, from vaccine coverage and efficacy to changes in diagnosis and reporting.

In the pre-vaccine era (1940-1945), the incidence rate of whooping cough in the United States was 150–160 per 100,000 population.

The inscription of the statistic, “In the pre-vaccine era (1940-1945), the incidence rate of whooping cough in the United States was 150–160 per 100,000 population.” into our blog about Whooping Cough Statistics serves as a compelling preamble to underscore the gravity and prevalence of the disease in the era devoid of vaccines. This monumental statistic stands as a stark reminder of times when whooping cough, unchecked in its ferocity, left an indelible impact on public health. Further, it sets a powerful context allowing the readers to appreciate the role and effectiveness of vaccines in disease control and underlines the progress made in the field of public health since the advent of the Whooping Cough vaccine.

In 2015, over 60% of the worldwide pertussis cases and over 70% of the related deaths occurred in children aged less than 5 years.

Unveiling a chilling truth, the data reveals a paramount concern; in 2015, more than 60% of global pertussis incidents and over 70% of consequent deaths embroiled the innocents aged less than five years. Sounding a clarion call in our examination of whooping cough and its devastating impact, these figures testify to the vulnerability of this young population. This alarming trend underscores an urgent need to propel forward-thinking initiatives, which could include advancements in preventive measures, policies, and medical treatments, aimed at safeguarding this susceptible age group against whooping cough’s merciless grip. It’s an outright demonstration of the immense price of negligence and the evident gap that exists within our global healthcare strategies.

In 2019, the highest number of whooping cough cases in USA was seen in children aged 10-14 years.

Striding through the abstract world of numbers and data, the striking revelation lurks within the 2019 whooping cough statistics in the USthe most vulnerable demographic group was children aged 10-14 years. This pivots the blog post’s narrative, arresting the reader’s attention with a critical focus on this age range, enabling a comprehensive exploration of reasons underlying this alarming statistic. Factors may range from the waning of vaccine-derived immunity to potential lapses in the vaccination schedule. This nugget of information energizes discussions on prevention strategies, vaccine research, and public health policies, fostering a deeper understanding that could shape the path to reducing whooping cough incidence in future years.

An estimated 24.1 million cases and 160,700 deaths from whooping cough occurred globally in 2014.

Emerging from the core of this data, the staggering prevalence of whooping cough in 2014, with an estimated 24.1 million cases and 160,700 deaths worldwide, paints a grim tableau that ratifies the seriousness of our discourse. In addition to providing tangible evidence of the global scale and lethality of this disease, the numbers also function as a compelling call-to-action for healthcare authorities and professionals. They assist in illuminating the essential need for increased awareness, preventive measures, improved care, and, if viable, effective vaccination strategies. Therefore, within the terrain of our exploration of whooping cough statistics, such heartrending insights are not only deeply significant but also contextually indispensable.

Among 48 states and 13 local areas reporting vaccination data, 95.8% of kindergartners were vaccinated against pertussis during the 2020-21 school year.

Shining a light on our efforts to combat pertussis, a pernicious and sometimes deadly ailment known commonly as whooping cough, the statistics cite a promising 95.8% immunization coverage among kindergartners across 48 states and 13 local areas during the 2020-21 school year. This indicates a high level of disease protection within our young population, thereby mitigating the risk of transmission, reducing possible outbreaks of this highly contagious disease, and reflecting not only the success of our healthcare services but also the trust and responsibility amongst parents, caregivers and school communities in safeguarding our children’s health.

The estimated global coverage with 3 doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccine was 85% in 2019.

Shining a light on the significance of global immunization efforts, the record of 85% coverage with 3 doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccine in 2019 taps at the crux of our collective fight against whooping cough. Not just a number, this statistic underscores the headway made in safeguarding public health, highlighting the strides taken towards curtailing the incidence of whooping cough worldwide. Further, it provides a glimpse into the potential for success and the challenges that lie ahead in achieving global immunity against this deadly disease. In essence, it’s a compass guiding us through the journey of healthcare improvement, whilst providing a barometer for future public health strategies and policies.

Conclusion

The statistical analysis of Whooping Cough shows a variable prevalence across demographics. Despite the availability of effective vaccinations, there seems to be a resurgence of cases, further emphasizing the importance of understanding its epidemiological trends. Our analysis indicates that communities with compromised vaccination rates may be most at risk. Therefore, continued surveillance, improved compliance with immunization recommendations, and public health initiatives are crucial in mitigating the impact of this disease.

References

0. – https://www.www.latimes.com

1. – https://www.www.ausmed.com.au

2. – https://www.www.medpagetoday.com

3. – https://www.jamanetwork.com

4. – https://www.www.who.int

5. – https://www.www.canada.ca

6. – https://www.www.cdc.gov

7. – https://www.www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

FAQs

What is whooping cough?

Whooping cough, also known as pertussis, is a highly contagious respiratory disease caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis. It is characterized by severe coughing spells that end in a "whooping" sound when the person breathes in.

How is whooping cough spread?

Whooping cough is spread through droplets from coughing or sneezing. Close contact with an infected person significantly increases the risk of transmission.

What are the symptoms of whooping cough?

Whooping cough typically begins with cold-like symptoms, including a mild cough and fever. After 1-2 weeks, patients often develop a severe, persistent cough with a characteristic whooping sound during intake of breath after a coughing episode. Other symptoms can include a runny nose, sneezing, and occasional vomiting.

Is there a vaccine for whooping cough?

Yes, the DTaP and Tdap vaccines are used to protect against whooping cough in children and adults, respectively. It's typically given as a series of shots in childhood, with a booster dose in adolescence and adulthood.

Are certain populations more susceptible to whooping cough?

Children under six months of age are particularly susceptible to whooping cough because they haven't completed the full course of vaccinations yet. Other high-risk groups include older adults, pregnant women, and those with weakened immune systems. Despite vaccination, it's possible for anyone to contract the disease, though the symptoms are often less severe in vaccinated individuals.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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