GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Tuberculosis Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Tuberculosis Statistics

  • TB is present in all countries and age groups, but the highest burden is in low- and middle-income countries.
  • TB is one of the top 10 causes of death and the leading cause from a single infectious agent globally as of 2020.
  • TB killed 1.5 million people in 2020 (including 214 000 people with HIV). Over 95% of TB deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries.
  • TB treatment has saved 66 million lives between 2000 and 2019.
  • 8.2% of TB cases were among people living with HIV.
  • The largest number of new TB cases occurred in the South-East Asia region, with 44% of new cases, followed by the African region with 25% of new cases and the Western Pacific with 18%.
  • TB is a leading killer of people who are HIV infected.
  • In 2020, children accounted for 11% of all TB cases.
  • Globally in 2020, the TB incidence rate was 129 cases per 100,000 population.
  • Drug-resistant TB is now a public health crisis and a health security threat globally with estimated 465,000 people developed rifampicin-resistant TB in 2020.
  • Around 3.3% of new TB cases and 17.7% of previously treated cases had multidrug-resistant or rifampicin-resistant TB (MDR/RR-TB) in 2020.
  • An estimated 558,000 people in the world have multi-drug resistant tuberculosis.
  • In 2020, 214,000 deaths were caused by tuberculosis among HIV-positive individuals worldwide.
  • In 2020, an estimated 41,000 women aged 45-54 died from tuberculosis worldwide.
  • Africa had the highest death rate from tuberculosis worldwide in 2020, with 76 deaths per 100,000 individuals.
  • In 2000, the age-standardized death rate from tuberculosis worldwide was 1,821.8 deaths per million people.
  • The total federal tuberculosis funding in the United States was 242 million U.S. dollars in 2020.
  • India reported around 2.64 million new cases of tuberculosis in 2019, the highest by any country.

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As a cornerstone of global health, Tuberculosis (TB) has been at the forefront for years, affecting millions of lives worldwide. This blog post aims to delve into the heart of TB statistics, exploring its prevalence rates, demographic distribution, mortality counts, and overall impact on the global society. Guided by hard data and accurate statistics, our post will provide readers with an in-depth understanding of the current state of this ongoing health crisis, as well as trends over the past decade. Join us as we explore these critical figures and what they mean for the future of global public health.

The Latest Tuberculosis Statistics Unveiled

TB is present in all countries and age groups, but the highest burden is in low- and middle-income countries.

Highlighting the statistic that Tuberculosis (TB) is prevalent in all nations and demographics, yet concentrates significantly in low-to-middle-income countries, paints a crucial picture about the socio-economic facets of this disease. It delineates the harsh reality of global health inequity; emphasizing that TB, while universally present, disproportionately affects the economically marginalized regions, revealing a narrative that extends beyond mere numbers. Consequently, in a discourse about Tuberculosis Statistics, this statistic not only raises critical consciousness about the geographical and socio-economic distribution of the disease but also advocates for targeted health initiatives and funding to mitigate this pressing health hazard.

TB is one of the top 10 causes of death and the leading cause from a single infectious agent globally as of 2020.

The riveting statistic that Tuberculosis (TB) holds the ominous distinction of being among the top 10 causes of death worldwide, moreover, the principle death-causing single infectious agent globally as of 2020, serves as a stark reminder of TB’s indomitable presence in our world. In a blog post dedicated to Tuberculosis statistics, this figure erases any doubts about the gravity and critical status of the disease, thereby illustrating the urgent need for continued scientific investigation, improved healthcare measures, public awareness, and proactive interventions to battle this menacing adversary.

TB killed 1.5 million people in 2020 (including 214 000 people with HIV). Over 95% of TB deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries.

Emerging from this stark statistic ‘In 2020, Tuberculosis (TB) claimed 1.5 million lives, including 214,000 people living with HIV, with over 95% of these deaths transpiring in low and middle-income countries,’ is a compelling call to action, challenging us all to redouble our efforts against this deadly disease. This datum paints a vivid picture of the scale and geographical distribution of the TB problem, accentuating its devastating impact, especially among low and middle-income societies. It underscores not just the fatal synergy between TB and HIV, but also inequalities in health and social systems worldwide. As such, the escalating numbers amidst the HIV epidemic and the overwhelming concentration of cases in poverty-stricken areas underline the critical need for more strategic, comprehensive, and targeted public health interventions to halt and roll back this ongoing global health crisis.

TB treatment has saved 66 million lives between 2000 and 2019.

The awe-inspiring statistic, ‘TB treatment has saved 66 million lives between 2000 and 2019’, casts a spotlight on the commendable progress made against the deadly disease, Tuberculosis. It encompasses a narrative of triumph over adversity, underscoring the effectiveness of dedicated medical interventions and robust health policies. In the panoramic tableau of Tuberculosis Statistics, this figure stands as a testament to the profound impact of medical advancements. It not only illustrates the number of lives reclaimed from the clutches of this disease but also rekindles hope for the relentless strive towards its global eradication.

8.2% of TB cases were among people living with HIV.

Delving into the alarming statistic that 8.2% of TB cases were among people living with HIV, uncovers a significant association between Tuberculosis and HIV, two major global health threats. This interplay reveals a vulnerable population in our society that, already grappling with the relentless effects of the HIV virus, shoulder a greater risk of being inflicted with TB as well. In the sphere of Tuberculosis statistics, this alarming figure serves as a stark reminder of the necessity for deeper studies, continuous public health campaigns, and aggressive interventions focusing specifically on those with HIV to curb the unsettling spread of Tuberculosis in this population subgroup.

The largest number of new TB cases occurred in the South-East Asia region, with 44% of new cases, followed by the African region with 25% of new cases and the Western Pacific with 18%.

This intriguing statistic vividly underscores the geographical disparities in the occurrence of Tuberculosis (TB), placing the spotlight on the urgency for customised intervention strategies. In particular, the South-East Asia region emerging as the epicenter of new TB cases at a staggering 44%, alongside Africa at 25%, epitomizes the significant health burdens these regions shoulder. Furthermore, the Western Pacific’s considerable 18% puts forth a stark illustration of the disease’s widespread nature. Thus, this statistic acts as a compass, guiding both the discourse and action to regions where the need for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of TB is in paramount demand.

TB is a leading killer of people who are HIV infected.

Untangling the complex web of Tuberculosis (TB) statistics reveals a haunting reality: a sinister synergy between TB and HIV infection. HIV-infected individuals, already grappling with an immunocompromised status, significantly contribute to TB fatalities, reinforcing the ferocity of TB as not just a persistent global health threat but also an unforgiving killer. This statistic serves as an urgent wake-up call, prompting the need for holistic, integrated strategies against these dual epidemics. It underscores the importance of understanding the intersectionality in disease morbidity and mortality patterns, essential for shaping targeted, effective public health policies, interventions, and research agenda in the relentless battle against TB and HIV.

In 2020, children accounted for 11% of all TB cases.

Grasping the percentage of children impacted by Tuberculosis in 2020 elucidates a crucial facet of the disease’s landscape. Representing 11% of all reported TB cases provides a vivid snapshot of the prevalence of Tuberculosis among the younger population, indicating that TB is not exclusively an adult affliction. This figure underscores the urgency and need for robust strategies targeting this population, such as preventative measures, early detection, and child-specific treatment protocols. Drawing attention to this demographic in a blog on Tuberculosis statistics can foster greater awareness and stimulate conversation around pediatric TB, potentially leading to improved morbidity outcomes.

Globally in 2020, the TB incidence rate was 129 cases per 100,000 population.

Grasping the essence of the implication, ‘Globically in 2020, the TB incidence rate was 129 cases per 100,000 population’ unravels a significant concern within the realm of public health. This statistic casts light on the highly prevalent nature of Tuberculosis(TB), thereby emphasizing the scale at which this infectious disease is impacting communities worldwide. Furthermore, it offers a stark perspective on the urgency and thrust needed in TB prevention efforts, treatment strategies, and resource allocation. Being armed with this data, readers can better comprehend the magnitude of the issue at hand, spurring informed discussions and inspiring action. As we trace the incidence of TB, we not only understand its past patterns but can predict future trends, a vital factor in shaping effective policies and interventions.

Drug-resistant TB is now a public health crisis and a health security threat globally with estimated 465,000 people developed rifampicin-resistant TB in 2020.

In the global landscape of Tuberculosis (TB) statistics, the surging numbers of drug-resistant TB patients make for a chilling revelation. An alarming figure, that an estimated 465,000 people developed rifampicin-resistant TB in 2020, unfolds a daunting scenario in the war against this relentless pathogen. Beyond its portrayal of an individual’s personal struggle for health, this statistic raises an underscored concern about a potential healthcare catastrophe of pandemic proportions. It rings the alarum for an urgent need to step up research, enhance diagnosis techniques, and improve access to effective treatment to keep this nefarious threat under control.

Around 3.3% of new TB cases and 17.7% of previously treated cases had multidrug-resistant or rifampicin-resistant TB (MDR/RR-TB) in 2020.

Highlighting the prevalence of drug-resistant TB strains in new and recurring patients underscores a prevalent, escalating health issue. The data, showing 3.3% of new TB cases and 17.7% of previously treated cases harbored multidrug-resistant or rifampicin-resistant TB (MDR/RR-TB) in 2020, casts light on the emergent challenge in curbing and treating TB. Implications extend beyond immediate patient care and prognosis—it signals increased difficulty in arresting the spread of more resilient TB strains, the necessity for research in advanced treatments, and the evolution of public health measures to counteract this trend. The figures depict an alarming spectacle of the current TB crisis and the substantial obstacles encumbering eradication efforts.

An estimated 558,000 people in the world have multi-drug resistant tuberculosis.

Highlighting that a staggering 558,000 people globally are grappling with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis offers an alarming revelation of this public health crisis. The gravity of this figure lies in how it illuminates the magnitude of the challenge the medico-scientific community faces. Battling this strain of tuberculosis is complex due to its resistance to the two most potent TB drugs. Therefore, underlining this statistic in a blog post on Tuberculosis Statistics accentuates the urgency and importance of renewed global efforts in scientific research, drug development, and investment in healthcare systems to effectively combat this tenacious disease and bring relief to these half a million people and counting.

In 2020, 214,000 deaths were caused by tuberculosis among HIV-positive individuals worldwide.

The compelling figure of 214,000 deaths due to tuberculosis among HIV-positive individuals in 2020 aptly highlights the dangerous intersection of two major health crises on a global scale. This potent statistic underscores the importance of integrated healthcare approaches, with a specific focus on simultaneous tackling of HIV and tuberculosis. Particularly within a blog post centered on Tuberculosis statistics, this number serves to illuminate the broader narratives around disease interplay, co-morbidity risks, and healthcare strategy formulation. It also underscores the necessity for enhanced research, funding and policy response in the fight against these co-existing epidemics.

In 2020, an estimated 41,000 women aged 45-54 died from tuberculosis worldwide.

Unmasking the grim truth of Tuberculosis’ global reach, the figure of 41,000 unfortunate fatalities among women aged 45-54 in 2020 bears the weight of sheer human tragedy. Entwined within these numbers is an implicit call to attention and action, compelling us to consider how this airborne disease disproportionately impacts this particular demographic. Accustomed as we may be to viewing statistics in isolation, such chilling figures serve as stark reminders of the human lives at stake, the significance of public awareness, appropriate preventive measures, and timely medical intervention. Highlighting the scope and severity of Tuberculosis through such figures, reinforces the urgency of ongoing research, medical advancements and public health policies tailored to shield the vulnerable populace from the lethal grasp of this implacable disease.

Africa had the highest death rate from tuberculosis worldwide in 2020, with 76 deaths per 100,000 individuals.

In the web of Tuberculosis statistics, the grim data of Africa, having been declared as the region with the highest death rate worldwide in 2020, stands out starkly. Gazing at the chilling figure of 76 deaths per 100,000 individuals casts a revealing spotlight onto the brutal, encompassing grasp of the disease in this region. This accentuates the urgency and importance of strengthened health measures, advanced research and augmented resources to tackle the Tuberculosis crisis in Africa. Moreover, it ignites a deeper discussion about the socio-economic conditions, healthcare systems, and public awareness strategies that are influencing such alarmingly high mortality rates.

In 2000, the age-standardized death rate from tuberculosis worldwide was 1,821.8 deaths per million people.

The cited statistic, indicating 1,821.8 deaths per million people from tuberculosis worldwide in 2000, offers a vital perspective on the historical severity of this disease. As an age-standardized measure, it eliminates the effects of differing age structures among populations, thereby ensuring an accurate comparison over time or between distinct regions. This data reference effectively enables us to comprehend the global health landscape at the turn of the millennium, acting as a rallying cry for increased public awareness, strategic policymaking, and prioritizing healthcare interventions subsequently. Furthermore, it serves as a benchmark for gauging the effectiveness of various preventive and curative measures across the years, underscoring the progress we’ve made or highlighting areas needing urgent attention in the continuous fight against Tuberculosis.

The total federal tuberculosis funding in the United States was 242 million U.S. dollars in 2020.

Shining a spotlight on the hefty sum of 242 million U.S. dollars allotted for federal tuberculosis (TB) funding in the United States during 2020 underscores the nation’s earnest commitment to confront and vanquish this perilous disease. The funding serves as a lifeline, nurturing cutting-edge research, supporting prevention programs, bolstering health education, and underpinning the availability of lifesaving treatments – the keys to arresting TB. In our exploration of Tuberculosis Statistics, this figure stands as a testament to the gravity of the fight against TB, providing a context for understanding the scale of the efforts being invested to eradicate the disease within the country.

India reported around 2.64 million new cases of tuberculosis in 2019, the highest by any country.

Emphasizing the magnitude of Tuberculosis’ impact, recent figures reveal that India alone accounted for approximately 2.64 million new cases of the disease in 2019, a sobering testament to its status as the country most besieged by this ailment. The aforementioned data not only underscores the overwhelming prevalence of tuberculosis within the Indian subcontinent but also highlights the crucial need for concentrated global efforts and resources towards mitigating the widespread affliction. In a Tuberculosis Statistics themed blog post, these potent numbers illuminate the stark reality and help to contextualize the broader narrative on the epidemiological trends of this persistent disease worldwide.

Conclusion

The data on Tuberculosis (TB) affirm its global health significance, with disproportionate impacts in developing countries and significant populations such as people living with HIV/AIDS. While the globally observed decline in TB incidents and deaths is encouraging, these statistics underline the urgency for sustained and strengthened efforts towards the eventual eradication of the disease. Greater investments in areas of TB prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and research, as well as addressing social determinants of the disease, are key to achieving the desired outcomes.

References

0. – https://www.www.statista.com

1. – https://www.www.who.int

2. – https://www.www.cdc.gov

FAQs

What is tuberculosis and how is it caused?

Tuberculosis is a highly infectious disease typically affecting the lungs, caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It spreads from person to person through tiny droplets released into the air via coughs and sneezes of those infected.

How prevalent is tuberculosis globally?

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), an estimated 10 million people fell ill with tuberculosis in 2019. It is one of the top 10 causes of death worldwide, and a leading killer for those infected with HIV.

How effective is the BCG vaccine in preventing tuberculosis?

The BCG vaccine (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) is about 70 to 80 percent effective against the most severe forms of tuberculosis, such as TB meningitis, especially in children. However, its effectiveness against pulmonary tuberculosis, the most common form of TB in adults, widely varies.

How is tuberculosis diagnosed?

Tuberculosis is mainly diagnosed through a skin test, blood test, imaging (like a chest X-ray), or through a microscopic examination and culture of body fluids. The presence of the bacteria confirms the diagnosis of tuberculosis.

Can tuberculosis be cured?

Yes, tuberculosis is curable and preventable. The most common form of treatment is a standard 6-month course of 4 antimicrobial drugs, provided the treatment is fully completed. However, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) can complicate the treatment process.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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