GITNUX REPORT 2024

Global Tuberculosis Statistics Reveal Alarming Impact and Challenges Ahead

TB continues to be a global threat - 10.6 million cases in 2021, with 1.6 million deaths.

Author: Jannik Lindner

First published: 7/17/2024

Statistic 1

The male:female ratio for global TB cases in 2021 was 1.6:1.

Statistic 2

About 80% of TB cases were among adults (aged ≥15 years) in 2021.

Statistic 3

The global male:female ratio of incident TB cases in 2021 was 1.6:1.

Statistic 4

About 56% of TB cases were among adult men (aged ≥15 years) in 2021.

Statistic 5

About 33% of TB cases were among adult women in 2021.

Statistic 6

Globally in 2021, 5.8 million people were diagnosed with TB.

Statistic 7

In 2021, 161 million people were screened for TB.

Statistic 8

Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) remains a public health crisis, with only about 1 in 3 people accessing treatment in 2021.

Statistic 9

In 2021, 450,000 people developed rifampicin-resistant TB (RR-TB).

Statistic 10

In 2021, 57% of bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary TB cases were tested for rifampicin resistance.

Statistic 11

The treatment success rate for MDR/RR-TB was 59% globally in 2019.

Statistic 12

The prevalence of MDR/RR-TB was 3.6% among new TB cases and 18% among previously treated cases globally in 2021.

Statistic 13

In 2021, close to half a million people developed rifampicin-resistant TB (RR-TB).

Statistic 14

The treatment success rate for MDR/RR-TB has improved in recent years, reaching 59% globally for patients starting treatment in 2018.

Statistic 15

Worldwide, only about one in three people with drug-resistant TB accessed treatment in 2021.

Statistic 16

The WHO South-East Asia Region accounted for 43% of global TB cases in 2021.

Statistic 17

The WHO African Region accounted for 25% of global TB cases in 2021.

Statistic 18

Eight countries accounted for two-thirds of the global total of TB cases: India, Indonesia, China, the Philippines, Pakistan, Nigeria, Bangladesh and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Statistic 19

In 2021, the 30 high TB burden countries accounted for 86% of new TB cases.

Statistic 20

In 2021, the largest number of new TB cases occurred in the WHO South-East Asian Region, with 43% of new cases.

Statistic 21

In 2021, about half of people with TB were in 8 countries: India (28%), Indonesia (9.2%), China (7.4%), the Philippines (7.0%), Pakistan (5.8%), Nigeria (4.4%), Bangladesh (3.6%) and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (2.9%).

Statistic 22

In 2021, 85% of new TB cases occurred in 30 high TB burden countries.

Statistic 23

In 2021, 30 high TB burden countries accounted for 86% of all estimated incident cases worldwide.

Statistic 24

Eight countries account for two thirds of the total TB cases globally: India, China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Pakistan, Nigeria, Bangladesh and South Africa.

Statistic 25

In 2021, the 30 high TB burden countries accounted for 86% of new TB cases.

Statistic 26

TB is the 13th leading cause of death worldwide.

Statistic 27

TB is the second leading infectious killer after COVID-19.

Statistic 28

Globally, TB is the leading cause of death from a single infectious agent.

Statistic 29

The COVID-19 pandemic has reversed years of global progress in reducing the number of people who die from TB.

Statistic 30

In 2021, global spending on TB diagnostic, treatment and prevention services fell to US$ 5.4 billion, less than half of the global target of US$ 13 billion annually by 2022.

Statistic 31

In 2021, an estimated 10.6 million people fell ill with tuberculosis (TB) worldwide.

Statistic 32

The global TB incidence rate is falling at about 2% per year.

Statistic 33

Between 2015 and 2021, the cumulative reduction in the TB incidence rate was 10%.

Statistic 34

About one-quarter of the world's population has a TB infection.

Statistic 35

Globally, TB incidence is falling at about 2% per year, which should be 4–5% to reach the 2020 milestones of the End TB Strategy.

Statistic 36

The reduction in global TB incidence between 2015 and 2021 was only 10%, far from the End TB Strategy milestone of 20% reduction between 2015 and 2020.

Statistic 37

The global TB incidence rate is falling, but not fast enough to reach the first milestone of the End TB Strategy.

Statistic 38

The number of people falling ill with TB each day is approximately 28,000.

Statistic 39

In 2021, about 10.6 million people developed TB disease, equivalent to 134 cases per 100,000 population.

Statistic 40

The global TB incidence rate is falling at about 1.5% per year.

Statistic 41

The number of new cases of TB per 100,000 population per year is falling worldwide at about 2% per year.

Statistic 42

Globally, TB incidence is falling at about 2% per year and between 2015 and 2021 the cumulative reduction was 11%.

Statistic 43

People living with HIV accounted for 7.5% of all people with TB in 2021.

Statistic 44

In 2021, 187,000 people with HIV died from TB.

Statistic 45

The WHO European Region and WHO African Region had the highest proportion of TB cases with HIV coinfection, 8.5% and 23% respectively.

Statistic 46

The risk of developing TB is 18 times higher in people living with HIV than in the general population.

Statistic 47

In 2021, 26% of people with TB were also living with HIV.

Statistic 48

The WHO African Region accounted for 85% of the global total of people with TB who were living with HIV in 2021.

Statistic 49

In 2021, 88% of people living with HIV who were diagnosed with TB were on antiretroviral therapy.

Statistic 50

1.6 million people died from TB in 2021 (including 187 000 people with HIV).

Statistic 51

More than 95% of TB deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries.

Statistic 52

The global TB mortality rate is falling at about 3% per year.

Statistic 53

Between 2015 and 2021, the cumulative reduction in the TB mortality rate was 21%.

Statistic 54

In 2021, the global number of TB deaths among HIV-negative people was 1.3 million.

Statistic 55

Approximately 4,400 people lose their lives to TB every day.

Statistic 56

In 2021, 1.6 million people died from TB, including 187,000 among people with HIV.

Statistic 57

In 2021, 1.2 million children fell ill with TB globally.

Statistic 58

An estimated 210,000 children died from TB in 2021.

Statistic 59

About 11% of TB cases were among children (aged <15 years) in 2021.

Statistic 60

In 2021, 1.2 million children (0-14 years of age) fell ill with TB globally.

Statistic 61

Child and adolescent TB is often overlooked by health providers and can be difficult to diagnose and treat.

Statistic 62

People with diabetes have a 2-3 times higher risk of TB compared to people without diabetes.

Statistic 63

An estimated 66 million lives were saved through TB diagnosis and treatment between 2000 and 2021.

Statistic 64

The treatment success rate for people newly enrolled on treatment in 2020 was 86%.

Statistic 65

Globally in 2021, 85% of people who developed TB completed treatment successfully.

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Summary

  • In 2021, an estimated 10.6 million people fell ill with tuberculosis (TB) worldwide.
  • 1.6 million people died from TB in 2021 (including 187 000 people with HIV).
  • TB is the 13th leading cause of death worldwide.
  • TB is the second leading infectious killer after COVID-19.
  • In 2021, 1.2 million children fell ill with TB globally.
  • An estimated 210,000 children died from TB in 2021.
  • Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) remains a public health crisis, with only about 1 in 3 people accessing treatment in 2021.
  • In 2021, 450,000 people developed rifampicin-resistant TB (RR-TB).
  • The WHO South-East Asia Region accounted for 43% of global TB cases in 2021.
  • The WHO African Region accounted for 25% of global TB cases in 2021.
  • Eight countries accounted for two-thirds of the global total of TB cases: India, Indonesia, China, the Philippines, Pakistan, Nigeria, Bangladesh and the Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • The global TB incidence rate is falling at about 2% per year.
  • Between 2015 and 2021, the cumulative reduction in the TB incidence rate was 10%.
  • An estimated 66 million lives were saved through TB diagnosis and treatment between 2000 and 2021.
  • The treatment success rate for people newly enrolled on treatment in 2020 was 86%.

Move over COVID-19, TB is here to stay – statistically speaking! In 2021, an estimated 10.6 million people worldwide fell ill with tuberculosis (TB), making it the 13th leading cause of death globally. With 1.6 million TB-related deaths, including 187,000 among individuals with HIV, TB remains a formidable foe. Join us as we dive into the numbers that show TB’s grip on the world, from the staggering mortality rates to the troubling treatment access issues. Brace yourself for a data-packed journey through the highs and lows of the TB landscape!

Demographics

  • The male:female ratio for global TB cases in 2021 was 1.6:1.
  • About 80% of TB cases were among adults (aged ≥15 years) in 2021.
  • The global male:female ratio of incident TB cases in 2021 was 1.6:1.
  • About 56% of TB cases were among adult men (aged ≥15 years) in 2021.
  • About 33% of TB cases were among adult women in 2021.

Interpretation

In the world of tuberculosis, it seems that gender bias is alive and kicking, with male cases outweighing the female ones in a ratio that could almost pass for a quirky mathematical formula. The numbers tell a poignant tale - with adult men bearing the brunt of this age-old disease. Perhaps it's time for TB to ditch its outdated preferences and spread its attention more equally among the sexes. After all, bacteria don't discriminate based on gender, so why should the statistics?

Diagnosis

  • Globally in 2021, 5.8 million people were diagnosed with TB.
  • In 2021, 161 million people were screened for TB.

Interpretation

In 2021, 5.8 million individuals were handed a diagnosis of TB, while a whopping 161 million underwent TB screening – indeed, a tale of two numbers that highlights the persistent battle against this age-old disease. While the numbers may seem like a classic case of 'needle in a haystack,' each diagnosis and every screening represent a step towards outwitting TB. So let's keep counting, and soon enough, we might just tip the scales in favor of health and well-being for all.

Drug Resistance

  • Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) remains a public health crisis, with only about 1 in 3 people accessing treatment in 2021.
  • In 2021, 450,000 people developed rifampicin-resistant TB (RR-TB).
  • In 2021, 57% of bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary TB cases were tested for rifampicin resistance.
  • The treatment success rate for MDR/RR-TB was 59% globally in 2019.
  • The prevalence of MDR/RR-TB was 3.6% among new TB cases and 18% among previously treated cases globally in 2021.
  • In 2021, close to half a million people developed rifampicin-resistant TB (RR-TB).
  • The treatment success rate for MDR/RR-TB has improved in recent years, reaching 59% globally for patients starting treatment in 2018.
  • Worldwide, only about one in three people with drug-resistant TB accessed treatment in 2021.

Interpretation

The statistics on Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis scream a dire message through the numbers: treatment accessibility remains a game of chance, with less than half a fighting shot. It's a twisted lottery where half a million people draw the short straw of developing resistance, while global success rates lag behind at a mere 59%. It's a world where the odds are stacked against us, where the fight against these resilient bacteria is a high-stakes gamble that too many are still left to play alone. In this high-stakes game of cat and mouse, it's clear that we need to up the ante on our efforts to ensure that everyone gets a fair shot at overcoming this life-threatening disease.

Global Distribution

  • The WHO South-East Asia Region accounted for 43% of global TB cases in 2021.
  • The WHO African Region accounted for 25% of global TB cases in 2021.
  • Eight countries accounted for two-thirds of the global total of TB cases: India, Indonesia, China, the Philippines, Pakistan, Nigeria, Bangladesh and the Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • In 2021, the 30 high TB burden countries accounted for 86% of new TB cases.
  • In 2021, the largest number of new TB cases occurred in the WHO South-East Asian Region, with 43% of new cases.
  • In 2021, about half of people with TB were in 8 countries: India (28%), Indonesia (9.2%), China (7.4%), the Philippines (7.0%), Pakistan (5.8%), Nigeria (4.4%), Bangladesh (3.6%) and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (2.9%).
  • In 2021, 85% of new TB cases occurred in 30 high TB burden countries.
  • In 2021, 30 high TB burden countries accounted for 86% of all estimated incident cases worldwide.
  • Eight countries account for two thirds of the total TB cases globally: India, China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Pakistan, Nigeria, Bangladesh and South Africa.
  • In 2021, the 30 high TB burden countries accounted for 86% of new TB cases.

Interpretation

In a world where global health disparities are as glaring as they are persistent, the stark reality of Tuberculosis statistics in 2021 serves as a reminder that the burden of this ancient disease still falls disproportionately on the most vulnerable populations. With a dose of dark humor, one could say that TB seems to have a peculiar taste for certain countries, considering the top-ranking troublemakers like India, Indonesia, and China consistently making it to the TB hit list year after year. In this global tableau of suffering and resilience, the numbers paint a clear picture: the fight against TB is far from over, and the battle lines are drawn in regions where access to healthcare and resources remains an ongoing challenge.

Global Impact

  • TB is the 13th leading cause of death worldwide.
  • TB is the second leading infectious killer after COVID-19.
  • Globally, TB is the leading cause of death from a single infectious agent.
  • The COVID-19 pandemic has reversed years of global progress in reducing the number of people who die from TB.
  • In 2021, global spending on TB diagnostic, treatment and prevention services fell to US$ 5.4 billion, less than half of the global target of US$ 13 billion annually by 2022.

Interpretation

Tuberculosis, once overshadowed by the flashy newcomer COVID-19, is now back in the spotlight as the undisputed heavyweight champion of infectious killers. With a knack for persistence and a skillful ability to thrive even in the face of modern medicine, TB has reclaimed its throne as the leading cause of death from a single infectious agent. However, just as it was basking in its resurgence, the COVID-19 pandemic swooped in and dealt a harsh blow, reversing years of hard-fought progress in combating TB. As global spending on TB services falls short of targets, perhaps it's time for TB to step up its game and prove that even the most resilient of foes can be met with an equally formidable defense.

Global Incidence

  • In 2021, an estimated 10.6 million people fell ill with tuberculosis (TB) worldwide.
  • The global TB incidence rate is falling at about 2% per year.
  • Between 2015 and 2021, the cumulative reduction in the TB incidence rate was 10%.
  • About one-quarter of the world's population has a TB infection.
  • Globally, TB incidence is falling at about 2% per year, which should be 4–5% to reach the 2020 milestones of the End TB Strategy.
  • The reduction in global TB incidence between 2015 and 2021 was only 10%, far from the End TB Strategy milestone of 20% reduction between 2015 and 2020.
  • The global TB incidence rate is falling, but not fast enough to reach the first milestone of the End TB Strategy.
  • The number of people falling ill with TB each day is approximately 28,000.
  • In 2021, about 10.6 million people developed TB disease, equivalent to 134 cases per 100,000 population.
  • The global TB incidence rate is falling at about 1.5% per year.
  • The number of new cases of TB per 100,000 population per year is falling worldwide at about 2% per year.
  • Globally, TB incidence is falling at about 2% per year and between 2015 and 2021 the cumulative reduction was 11%.

Interpretation

Despite the gradual decline in the global TB incidence rate, the statistics make it evident that we are still far from achieving the ambitious targets set out by the End TB Strategy. With approximately 28,000 individuals falling ill with tuberculosis each day and only a 10% reduction in global TB incidence between 2015 and 2021, it seems we are inching along rather than racing towards success. As one-quarter of the world's population continues to grapple with TB infection, it's clear that our progress must pick up the pace if we are to truly make a dent in this persistent public health challenge. The fight against TB may be a marathon, but it's high time we start sprinting towards the finish line of global eradication.

HIV-TB Coinfection

  • People living with HIV accounted for 7.5% of all people with TB in 2021.
  • In 2021, 187,000 people with HIV died from TB.
  • The WHO European Region and WHO African Region had the highest proportion of TB cases with HIV coinfection, 8.5% and 23% respectively.
  • The risk of developing TB is 18 times higher in people living with HIV than in the general population.
  • In 2021, 26% of people with TB were also living with HIV.
  • The WHO African Region accounted for 85% of the global total of people with TB who were living with HIV in 2021.
  • In 2021, 88% of people living with HIV who were diagnosed with TB were on antiretroviral therapy.

Interpretation

Tuberculosis and HIV seem to have a relationship more complicated than a dramatic soap opera. With 7.5% of all TB cases cohabiting with HIV in 2021, it's no wonder these two have become the talk of the global health town. The WHO European Region and WHO African Region leading the charge with the highest rates of TB-HIV coexistence, it's a real crossover event for the ages. And with the risk of TB shooting up 18 times in people with HIV, it's like a dangerous game of health roulette. Thankfully, in this tangled web of statistics, there's a glimmer of hope – 88% of those living with both TB and HIV were availing themselves of antiretroviral therapy. Looks like even in the midst of this medical drama, there's room for a happy ending after all.

Mortality

  • 1.6 million people died from TB in 2021 (including 187 000 people with HIV).
  • More than 95% of TB deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries.
  • The global TB mortality rate is falling at about 3% per year.
  • Between 2015 and 2021, the cumulative reduction in the TB mortality rate was 21%.
  • In 2021, the global number of TB deaths among HIV-negative people was 1.3 million.
  • Approximately 4,400 people lose their lives to TB every day.
  • In 2021, 1.6 million people died from TB, including 187,000 among people with HIV.

Interpretation

Tuberculosis, a disease often overshadowed by flashier health crises, quietly persists as a deadly force, claiming 1.6 million lives in 2021. The statistics paint a stark picture: TB remains a formidable foe, disproportionately targeting low- and middle-income countries where resources are scarce. However, there is a glimmer of hope amidst the somber data - the global TB mortality rate is slowly declining at 3% per year. While progress is being made, the fight against this ancient disease requires continued vigilance and concerted efforts to ensure that the downward trend continues. After all, behind every statistic lies a human life lost, reminding us of the urgency to tackle TB with unwavering determination.

Pediatric TB

  • In 2021, 1.2 million children fell ill with TB globally.
  • An estimated 210,000 children died from TB in 2021.
  • About 11% of TB cases were among children (aged <15 years) in 2021.
  • In 2021, 1.2 million children (0-14 years of age) fell ill with TB globally.
  • Child and adolescent TB is often overlooked by health providers and can be difficult to diagnose and treat.

Interpretation

In a world where the latest gadgets and trends often dominate headlines, it seems that Tuberculosis, an uninvited classic, has been quietly making a resurgence among our youngest generation. With 1.2 million children around the globe falling ill with TB in 2021, it appears this old foe isn't ready to retire just yet. An estimated 210,000 young lives lost to TB last year serve as a somber reminder that this disease still warrants our attention and resources. Despite making up only 11% of TB cases in 2021, child and adolescent TB continues to be a challenging puzzle for health providers to crack, highlighting the need for increased focus on early detection and specialized care for our smallest warriors in the battle against this ancient scourge.

Risk Factors

  • People with diabetes have a 2-3 times higher risk of TB compared to people without diabetes.

Interpretation

It seems that for those with diabetes, the threat of tuberculosis is like a persistent salesperson knocking on their door – not just once, but two to three times harder and louder than for those without diabetes. This statistical double-tap serves as a concerning reminder that our bodies are interconnected systems, where seemingly unrelated conditions can unwittingly conspire against us. It underscores the importance of holistic healthcare and vigilance, lest we find ourselves caught in a crossfire of health concerns, reminiscent of a troublesome tag team match between diabetes and tuberculosis.

Treatment Success

  • An estimated 66 million lives were saved through TB diagnosis and treatment between 2000 and 2021.
  • The treatment success rate for people newly enrolled on treatment in 2020 was 86%.
  • Globally in 2021, 85% of people who developed TB completed treatment successfully.

Interpretation

With a success rate that would make even the most seasoned matchmaker envious, it seems Tuberculosis treatment has its act together. Saving 66 million lives is no small feat, proving that when it comes to diagnosing and treating TB, we are definitely on the winning side. With treatment success rates for both new and existing cases hovering around the 85-86% mark, it's clear that TB is putting up quite a fight - and fortunately, so are we. Let's keep this winning streak going and aim for a world where TB is nothing more than a distant memory.

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