GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Sweden Immigrant Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Sweden Immigrant Statistics

  • As of 2017, immigrants now make up about 18.5% of Sweden's population.
  • In 2019, there were 2,415,958 foreign-born persons living in Sweden, which constituted 23.7% of the total population.
  • In 2019, about 75400 people immigrated to Sweden.
  • From the year 2000 to 2019, the population of Sweden increased by 15%, of which 71% was due to immigration.
  • From 2000-2018, immigration to Sweden from non-European countries was 64.8%.
  • The largest immigrant group in Sweden is from Finland, which is 156,045 people as of 2018.
  • The second-largest immigrant group in Sweden as of 2019 is Syrians (190,209).
  • The third highest number of immigrants in Sweden are from Iraq (145,602).
  • The foreign-born population in Sweden has a higher unemployment rate (15%) compared to the Swedes (4.8%).
  • In the third quarter of 2020, of the foreign-born population aged 20-64 in Sweden, 68.9% were employed, compared with 81.1% of the population born in the country.
  • In 2020, 27% of the overall population in Sweden were immigrants or descendants of immigrants.
  • In 2016, approximately 28% of crimes in Sweden were committed by individuals born abroad.
  • In 2019, the population with a foreign background increased by 80,000.
  • In 2019, the main country of birth of first-time asylum seekers was Afghanistan.
  • In 2020, 6.3% of the total population in Sweden were born in Asia.
  • In 2019, 52% of the non-European immigrants have jobs, against nearly 84% of the native-born population.

Table of Contents

Delve into the diverse and dynamic landscape of Swedish immigration through the lens of statistics in this blog post. Over the past few decades, Sweden has been a beacon for immigrants worldwide due to its stable economy and high living standards. This multicultural influence has greatly sculpted Sweden’s societal fabric. Here, we venture into a comprehensive analysis of Sweden’s immigrant statistics, exploring the burgeoning trends, primary sources of immigration, and the socio-economic impacts brought about by such demographic shifts in the last few years. These figures not only shed light on Sweden’s immigration narrative but also frame our understanding of its future demographic landscape.

The Latest Sweden Immigrant Statistics Unveiled

As of 2017, immigrants now make up about 18.5% of Sweden’s population.

Highlighting the data that immigrants constitute approximately 18.5% of the population in Sweden as of 2017 showcases how the demographic landscape of the nation has evolved over the years. It reflects the country’s dynamic cultural fabric and reveals the extent of integration efforts necessary for embracing diversity. On an economic front, such a statistic holds implications for labor force composition, consumer trends, and the overall economic health of Sweden. For policy makers, it underscores the need to refine immigrant policies and catering services like health, education, and housing to a diverse population. Lastly, the migration trends indicated here can resonantly echo globally, providing valuable insights into international migration patterns and policies.

In 2019, there were 2,415,958 foreign-born persons living in Sweden, which constituted 23.7% of the total population.

Illuminating the multi-faceted texture of Sweden’s demographics, the compelling statistic that in 2019, 23.7% of Sweden’s population, equating to 2,415,958 individuals, were foreign-born, offers significant insights into the nation’s pronounced propensity towards cultural diversity, globalization and its pronounced acceptance towards displaced populace. As such, this statistic adds an influential dimension to the discussion on Sweden’s immigrant statistics, rendering it an indispensable dynamic to grasp the full extent of the country’s ethnological narrative. This resonates more effectively with the readers since it brings into focus an impactful socio-cultural transformation that has signficantly landscaped the Swedish social fabric.

In 2019, about 75400 people immigrated to Sweden.

Unveiling the scale of migration trends, the figure revealing that approximately 75,400 individuals immigrated to Sweden in 2019 becomes a vital piece in understanding Sweden’s demographic tapestry. This data point illuminates the significant role international migration plays in shaping Sweden’s society, with implications for various domains such as socio-economic development, policy formulation, and cultural evolution. In an exploration of immigrant statistics in Sweden, this number offers audiences a firm grounding to comprehend the ongoing shifts in population dynamics brought about by immigration, acting as an indispensable cornerstone for interpreting past trajectories, present realities, and potential future scenarios.

From the year 2000 to 2019, the population of Sweden increased by 15%, of which 71% was due to immigration.

Writing on the canvas of Sweden’s immigrant statistics, the pixel that paints an enlightening picture is a remarkable percentage of 71% of the 15% population growth from 2000 to 2019 attributable to immigration. This illustrates the substantial demographic influence of immigration within Sweden, which holds under its limelight an evolving society and economy. As a data-driven exhibit of the nation’s shifting identity, this statistic provides context to debates about immigration policies, cultural integration, labor market dynamics, and social resources allocation. Consequentially, this distills down to a crucial ingredient in comprehending the unfolding story of Sweden’s demographic landscape.

From 2000-2018, immigration to Sweden from non-European countries was 64.8%.

Illuminating the reality of Sweden as a nation embracing multicultural diversity, the data highlights that over the span of 2000-2018, a significant 64.8% of arrivals hailed from non-European countries. This figure underscores the immense demographic shifts Sweden has undergone over the course of the stated period, broadening the nation’s cultural tapestry and illustrating the rich global interaction it has fostered. As such, analysis of the lived experiences of these non-European migrants could offer profound insights into the narratives of integration, community building, and sociopolitical changes within Sweden’s evolving social landscape. The statistic also underscores Sweden’s role as a key global destination for migrants, with implications for immigration policy, socio-economic dynamics, and cultural analysis in the broader context of our blog post addressing Sweden’s immigrant statistics.

The largest immigrant group in Sweden is from Finland, which is 156,045 people as of 2018.

Painting an insightful picture of the immigrant demography in Sweden, an interesting morsel of data reveals that the Finnish represent the largest immigrant community, numbering at 156,045 individuals as of the year 2018. This snippet of information is highly pertinent for anyone curious about the cultural mosaic of Sweden, providing clear evidence of the significant Finnish influence woven into the Swedish societal fabric. Furthermore, as discerning readers of a blog post about Sweden’s immigration statistics, such information sharpens our understanding of the European migration patterns, and offers a more nuanced lens to interpret international relationships and cultural integration within Scandinavia.

The second-largest immigrant group in Sweden as of 2019 is Syrians (190,209).

Shedding light on the diverse cultural tapestry that makes up modern Sweden, the statistic underlines Syrians, numbering 190,209, as the second most significant immigrant group in the nation as of 2019. This intriguing demographic detail not only signifies the profound impact of geopolitical contexts like the Syrian crisis on global migration patterns, but also has implications for Sweden’s sociopolitical landscape, cultural milieu, and policy decisions. For policymakers, understanding Sweden’s Syrian community’s size is crucial to allocate resources effectively and create inclusive policies. For sociologists and cultural enthusiasts, the statistic could serve as a gateway to explore the fusion of Syrian and Swedish cultures and its impact on Sweden’s socio-cultural fabric.

The third highest number of immigrants in Sweden are from Iraq (145,602).

Highlighting the statistic that Iraqis constitute the third highest group of immigrants in Sweden, with a population of 145,602, offers an insightful perspective into Sweden’s demographic canvas. It paints a vivid picture of the multicultural social fabric that the country boasts, spotlighting the diverse blend of cultures, languages, and traditions that commingle within its borders. From a socio-economic angle, this information underscores the potential opportunities and challenges borne by this demographic shift, ranging from cultural integration, education and employment possibilities to policy-making considerations. Ultimately, this detail strengthens the depth and richness of dialogues and debates around immigration in Sweden, fostering a more nuanced understanding of the country’s demographic dynamics.

The foreign-born population in Sweden has a higher unemployment rate (15%) compared to the Swedes (4.8%).

Highlighting the discrepancy in unemployment rates between Sweden’s native and foreign-born populations, this statistic provides a critical insight into the employment scenario of immigrants within the nation. At 15%, the unemployment rate among the foreign-born populace showcases potential hurdles immigrants may encounter in the labour market, such as language barriers, credential recognition, or even potential discrimination. This is especially significant when contrasted against the significantly lower 4.8% unemployment rate amongst native Swedes. In a blog post about Swedish Immigrant Statistics, it underscores the complexities immigrants face in their integration journey, while also steering discussion about policies, opportunities, and social inclusivity for a more harmonised Swedish society.

In the third quarter of 2020, of the foreign-born population aged 20-64 in Sweden, 68.9% were employed, compared with 81.1% of the population born in the country.

Delving into the data, the striking shift in employment rates for foreign-born versus native-born Swedish citizens aged 20-64 vaults us into meaningful dialogue. A rate of 68.9% employment for the former, compared to 81.1% for the latter, during the third quarter of 2020, provides pivotal insight into the nuances of Sweden’s labor market. This statistic is an impactful touchstone, informing discourse on topics ranging from integration policy efficacy, labor market flexibility, disability interplay, to potential disparities in skill recognition. Its articulation in a blog post about Sweden immigrant statistics thus drives a deeper understanding of the experiences and challenges faced by foreign-born individuals in Sweden.

In 2020, 27% of the overall population in Sweden were immigrants or descendants of immigrants.

Casting a spotlight on the statistic that in 2020, 27% of the overall population in Sweden were immigrants or descendants of immigrants, furnishes us with an enlightening perspective on the dynamic demographic landscape of Sweden. This figure is crucial in understanding the profound role migration plays in shaping Swedish society and culture. Presenting a significant proportion, this demographic shift echoes the changing perspectives, practices, and policies towards immigration within the nation, while simultaneously reflecting the global trends of increased mobility and transnational ties in a globally connected world. In essence, this fact forms a vital piece of the Swedish immigrant statistics tapestry, leading readers to ponder upon the implications this could have on Sweden’s socio-economic and political sphere.

In 2016, approximately 28% of crimes in Sweden were committed by individuals born abroad.

Casting a spotlight on Sweden’s immigrant statistics through the lens of the 2016 criminal data, which elucidates that around 28% of crimes were attributed to individuals born overseas, invokes a critical discourse on the potential correlations between immigration and crime rates. The extent to which these figures influence public opinion, policy-making, and social integration, underscores their relevance in the broader dialogue. This statistical foundation encourages thorough evaluation and thoughtful discussion on how societies handle cultural assimilation, security considerations, and ethical aspects of immigration – shaping an insightful narrative into the challenges and opportunities of multicultural societies in this Nordic nation.

In 2019, the population with a foreign background increased by 80,000.

Unveiling an intriguing facet of Sweden’s demographic canvas, the notable rise by 80,000 in the populace with a foreign background in 2019 renders a vivid snapshot of the evolving immigrant patterns in the country. This uptick in figures not only underscores the allure of Sweden as a potential destination for individuals seeking better living prospects, but also influences the social, economic and political dynamics within the country. An informed interpretation of this trend could aid policy makers, sociologists and economists in gauging the impact on societal integration, labor market density and cultural diversity, essentials for drafting informed, inclusive and progressive policies.

In 2019, the main country of birth of first-time asylum seekers was Afghanistan.

Peeling back the layers of Sweden’s immigrant statistics, an intriguing narrative is revealed. The fact that Afghanistan was the primary country of origin for first-time asylum seekers in 2019 serves as a dramatic chapter in this narrative. It thrusts into spotlight the geopolitical instabilities causing Afghan citizens to seek shelter elsewhere, with Sweden being a prominent choice given its history of compassionate asylum policies. In the tapestry of immigration patterns, it is a vivid thread that subtly speaks to Sweden’s role as a sanctuary and the socioeconomic, cultural, and policy impacts that result from this.

In 2020, 6.3% of the total population in Sweden were born in Asia.

In painting a holistic picture of Sweden’s diverse demographic fabric, the fact that 6.3% of the country’s population in 2020 were Asian-born adds a very important brushstroke. It reveals a significant representation of Asians within the immigrant diaspora, highlighting Sweden’s appeal to this particular demographic, while bringing to the fore the multicultural aspects of Swedish society. The given data sharpens our understanding of the national immigrant distribution and underscores the cultural diversity and potential socio-economic dynamics resulting from such migration patterns.

In 2019, 52% of the non-European immigrants have jobs, against nearly 84% of the native-born population.

A bird’s-eye view at the statistic reveals an intriguing trend between non-European immigrants and the native-born population of Sweden in 2019. The finding that only 52% of non-European immigrants were employed contrasts sharply with the startling 84% employment among the native-born populace, suggesting a potential imbalance in the job market. This disparity is a pivotal piece of the puzzle for understanding the broader narrative of immigrant integration in Sweden — a story that hinges on employment opportunities, economic contribution, and potential social inequalities.

Conclusion

The immigrant population in Sweden constitutes a significant portion of its resident population, adding rich diversity to the cultural, social, and economic fabric of the country. Robust immigration policies, accompanied by effective strategies for integration into societal participation, allow immigrants to contribute positively to Sweden’s socio-economic development. Future studies will focus on understanding the nuances of immigrant demographics to even better inform policy direction and societal initiatives.

References

0. – https://www.www.scb.se

1. – https://www.www.pewresearch.org

2. – https://www.www.bra.se

3. – https://www.www.migpolgroup.com

4. – https://www.ec.europa.eu

5. – https://www.www.statista.com

6. – https://www.en.wikipedia.org

7. – https://www.sweden.se

8. – https://www.www.nordicstatistics.org

9. – https://www.www.iamexpat.nl

FAQs

How many immigrants are currently residing in Sweden?

As of 2021, there are approximately 2 million foreign-born individuals residing in Sweden, which constitutes about 20% of the country's overall population.

Which country do the majority of immigrants in Sweden originate from?

The majority of immigrants in Sweden originate from Syria, with more than 145,000 Syrian-born residents recorded by the end of 2020.

What was the peak year for asylum applications in Sweden?

The peak year for asylum applications in Sweden was 2015, during which Sweden received approximately 162,877 applications.

How many immigrants have gained Swedish citizenship in recent years?

In 2020, around 67,258 individuals were granted Swedish citizenship.

What is the gender distribution among the immigrants in Sweden?

As of 2021, the gender distribution among immigrants in Sweden is roughly equal, with a slight predominance of men, representing around 51%.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

Table of Contents