GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Must-Know Student Burnout Statistics [Latest Report]

Highlights: The Most Important Student Burnout Statistics

  • 11% of college and university students reported experiencing burnout in the past year, with higher rates among female, genderqueer, transgender, Black and multiracial students.
  • 51% of US teens are told at least once a month that they appear stressed or burnt out, with an average stress level of 5.8 out of 10 during the school year.
  • 11% of college and university students reported experiencing burnout in the past year, with higher rates among female, genderqueer, transgender, Black and multiracial students.
  • Undergraduate students, certain majors, and first-generation students are more likely to experience burnout than graduate students and other students.
  • 46.9% of medical students had high burnout scores and 44.6% expressed an intention to drop out, with fourth-year students having the highest burnout scores.
  • Burnout rates among university students are high, ranging from 5% to 75%, and academic pressure, lack of social support, and financial stress are all contributing factors.
  • 51% of US teens are told at least once a month that they appear stressed or burnt out, with an average stress level of 5.8 out of 10 during the school year.
  • 33.2% of 651 college students reported experiencing burnout, with females reporting higher levels than males.
  • Burnout is a major issue for college students, with over half of surveyed students experiencing anxiety or depression and 83% reporting a negative impact on academic performance. This is similar to the prevalence of burnout among Gen Z and Millennial workers.
  • A significant percentage of college students experience anxiety, depression, and burnout, with rates ranging from 5% to 75%.
  • Burnout is prevalent among medical students and is associated with poor mental health, academic performance, and satisfaction with medical education, with a significant percentage of burnout students reporting suicidal ideation and attempts.

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As the educational landscape continues to change, more and more students are feeling the strain. The issue of student burnout is now being discussed more widely than ever before, and the statistics about student burnout are startling.

From an increase in the amount of stress students face to an alarming rise in mental health issues, the data paint an alarming picture of the current student experience. In this article, we’ll explore the latest student burnout statistics and examine the implications for the future of education. We’ll also look at what educators, students, and parents can do to help prevent burnout and make sure students have the tools and resources they need to succeed.

By understanding the latest student burnout statistics and the causes behind them, we can work together to create a healthier, more successful educational environment for all.

Student Burnout: The Most Important Statistics

11% of college and university students reported experiencing burnout in the past year, with higher rates among female, genderqueer, transgender, Black and multiracial students.
46.9% of medical students had high burnout scores and 44.6% expressed an intention to drop out, with fourth-year students having the highest burnout scores.
51% of US teens are told at least once a month that they appear stressed or burnt out, with an average stress level of 5.8 out of 10 during the school year.

Student Burnout Statistics Overview

11% of college and university students reported experiencing burnout in the past year, with higher rates among female, genderqueer, transgender, Black and multiracial students.

This highlights the disproportionate impact of student burnout on certain groups of students, and the role of the COVID-19 pandemic in exacerbating the issue. It is essential to understand the factors that contribute to student burnout in order to develop effective strategies to address the issue.

Undergraduate students, certain majors, and first-generation students are more likely to experience burnout than graduate students and other students.

This suggests that certain groups of students are more likely to experience burnout than others. This can help inform strategies to reduce student burnout and provide targeted support to those who are most at risk.

46.9% of medical students had high burnout scores and 44.6% expressed an intention to drop out, with fourth-year students having the highest burnout scores.

It demonstrates the need for more support and feedback for medical students, as well as a reduction in academic demands and workload, in order to reduce burnout and the intention to drop out.

Burnout rates among university students are high, ranging from 5% to 75%, and academic pressure, lack of social support, and financial stress are all contributing factors.

Therefore, there is a need for interventions to prevent and address burnout among students, in order to promote academic success and overall well-being.

51% of US teens are told at least once a month that they appear stressed or burnt out, with an average stress level of 5.8 out of 10 during the school year.

The high rate of burnout among teens is concerning, as it is a significant risk factor for dropout and can have a negative impact on academic success and overall well-being.

33.2% of 651 college students reported experiencing burnout, with females reporting higher levels than males.

Those numbers highlight the need for universities to provide resources to help students manage stress and prevent burnout.

Burnout is a major issue for college students, with over half of surveyed students experiencing anxiety or depression and 83% reporting a negative impact on academic performance. This is similar to the prevalence of burnout among Gen Z and Millennial workers.

It shows the prevalence of burnout among college students and its negative impact on academic performance and mental health. It also shows the similarity of burnout among college students and Gen Z and Millennial workers, indicating that burnout is a widespread issue that needs to be addressed.

A significant percentage of college students experience anxiety, depression, and burnout, with rates ranging from 5% to 75%.

There are various factors that can contribute to student burnout, such as academic pressure, lack of social support, and financial stress.

Burnout is prevalent among medical students and is associated with poor mental health, academic performance, and satisfaction with medical education, with a significant percentage of burnout students reporting suicidal ideation and attempts.

High-stakes assignments and exams have been linked to an increase in suicide rates and self-harm among British and San Francisco students, suggesting burnout is a significant problem.

Conclusion

Student burnout is a serious issue that affects many students around the world. The statistics show that the problem is getting worse, with more students feeling overwhelmed, exhausted, and unable to cope with their studies.

It is important for students to take steps to prevent burnout, such as taking regular breaks, getting enough sleep, and engaging in activities outside of school. Schools, parents, and teachers can also help by providing support and resources to students who are struggling. By taking action to address student burnout, we can help ensure that students are able to reach their full potential.

References

1 – https://www.healthline.com/health-news/college-students-increasingly-report-high-levels-of-anxiety-and-burnout-during-the-pandemic#Change-is-difficult

2 – https://acuoptimist.com/2022/02/why-college-students-get-burnt-out-and-why-it-should-be-prevented/

3 – https://bmcmededuc.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12909-021-03094-9

4 – https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.792945/full

5 – https://broadview.sacredsf.org/18192/opinion/large-turnout-of-burnout/#:~:text=Not%20only%20do%20many%20have,seem%20stressed%20or%20burnt%20out.

6 – https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2022.825588/full

7 – https://thebestschools.org/magazine/how-to-avoid-burnout-in-college/

8 – https://thehill.com/changing-america/well-being/mental-health/565264-college-students-face-anxiety-depression-and/

9 – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18765703/

10 – https://www.sharecare.com/health/suicide-risk-factors/how-academic-stress-teen-suicide

FAQs

What is student burnout?

Student burnout is a state of physical, emotional, and mental exhaustion caused by excessive and prolonged stress.

What are the signs of student burnout?

Signs of student burnout include apathy, fatigue, lack of motivation, difficulty concentrating, insomnia, and physical illness.

What are the causes of student burnout?

Causes of student burnout can include academic pressure, financial stress, family problems, and personal issues.

How can student burnout be prevented?

Student burnout can be prevented by managing stress, setting realistic goals, taking regular breaks, and getting enough sleep.

How can student burnout be treated?

Treatment for student burnout can include counseling, relaxation techniques, and lifestyle changes.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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