GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Stomach Cancer Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Stomach Cancer Statistics

  • Approximately 27,600 people will be diagnosed with stomach cancer in the United States in 2020.
  • In 2017, there were approximately 1,033,701 new cases of stomach cancer diagnosed worldwide.
  • Stomach cancer is more common in men than women, and has its peak age range at 60-80 years.
  • In the United States, the lifetime risk of developing stomach cancer is 1 in 111.
  • Japan has the highest rate of stomach cancer, followed by Mongolia and South Korea.
  • Approximately 10,900 people will die from stomach cancer in the United States in 2021.
  • The 5-year survival rate for people with stomach cancer is 31.5%.
  • The overall rate of stomach cancer has dropped by about 1.5% each year over the last 10 years.
  • About 6 out of 10 people diagnosed with stomach cancer each year are 65 or older.

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In the realm of medical statistics, understanding the trends, risk factors, and survival rates linked with various diseases is crucial for preventative measures and treatment approaches. This blog post focuses on stomach cancer, a health concern that significantly impacts public health globally. Through an in-depth review of stomach cancer statistics, we unravel the prevalence, mortality rates, age correlations, racial and gender disparities, and the survival rates associated with this disease. These analyses provide a robust basis for addressing the stomach cancer challenge, ultimately aiming at diminishing its occurrence and improving patient outcomes.

The Latest Stomach Cancer Statistics Unveiled

Approximately 27,600 people will be diagnosed with stomach cancer in the United States in 2020.

Delineating the magnitude of the issue, the estimated figure of 27,600 new stomach cancer diagnoses in the U.S. in 2020 succinctly underscores the severity and prevalence of the disease. This data point is a compelling, stark reminder of stomach cancer’s far-reaching grip, elucidating the urgency for continued medical research, effective preventive measures, and advanced treatment options. The inclusion of such potent numerical evidence in a blog post about Stomach Cancer Statistics can potently drive the conversation surrounding the disease, fostering awareness and catalyzing advocacy among both the medically inclined and lay audiences.

In 2017, there were approximately 1,033,701 new cases of stomach cancer diagnosed worldwide.

Highlighting the staggering count of 1,033,701 new stomach cancer cases diagnosed worldwide in 2017, puts a clear spotlight on the pervasiveness and public health relevance of this condition. These figures serve as a stark reminder of the extensive global footprint of stomach cancer, underscoring the need for continued investment in early detection, treatment research, and preventative measures. This formidable figure contributes substantively to understanding the scale of the medical challenge and invokes a sense of urgency for readers of the blog post to advocate and support efforts in tackling this worldwide health concern.

Stomach cancer is more common in men than women, and has its peak age range at 60-80 years.

Highlighting the statistic that stomach cancer is more common in men than women, with a peak age range of 60-80 years, encapsulates the demographic realities of this disease in a blog post about Stomach Cancer Statistics. It arms readers, particularly men in this age bracket, with crucial knowledge that could potentially lead to early detection and intervention. This information could also guide research efforts and healthcare resource allocation, as understanding who is most affected by stomach cancer can assist in tailoring prevention efforts and treatment strategies, thereby enhancing people’s chances of survival and improving quality of life.

In the United States, the lifetime risk of developing stomach cancer is 1 in 111.

Underlining the entangled web of stomach cancer statistics, the chilling fact emerges that the lifetime risk of developing this disease in the United States stands at 1 in 111. Such a sobering number serves as a dire predictor of the prevalence and entrenched danger that this malady presents. Within the context of an informative blog post, this statistic acts as a clarion call for individuals to not only be informed but to also be proactive with their health, shedding light on the subtle but persistent shadow of stomach cancer lurking in our society. Knowing life’s roulette wheel spins such odds magnifies stomach cancer’s relevance, underlines the importance of early detection, and the urgency for continued research and innovative treatment modalities.

Japan has the highest rate of stomach cancer, followed by Mongolia and South Korea.

Framing the narrative of our blog post on Stomach Cancer Statistics, the figures from Japan, Mongolia and South Korea stride to the forefront. These countries bear the brunt with the highest rates of stomach cancer globally. Japan’s prevalence skews the scales, trailed next by Mongolia and South Korea. Scrutinizing these figures paves the way to unravel intriguing facets about potential cultural, gastronomical or genetic predispositions towards stomach cancer in these regions. More importantly, it underscores the dire urgency for proactive healthcare initiatives, early detection strategies and advanced treatments in these particular geographic pockets.

Approximately 10,900 people will die from stomach cancer in the United States in 2021.

Interpreting the profound revelation that almost 10,900 individuals will succumb to stomach cancer in the United States in 2021 instills a stark reality of the magnitude of this health issue. Such a statistic, presented in a blog post on Stomach Cancer Statistics, illuminates both the severity of this disease and the urgency of adopting preventative measures, extensive research, and progressive treatment methodologies. The gravity of these figures moves beyond mere numbers, underlining the narratives of affected lives, loss and consequently, the need for increased societal awareness and concerted medical interventions.

The 5-year survival rate for people with stomach cancer is 31.5%.

Unveiling the stark reality of stomach cancer, the 5-year survival rate stands at a daunting 31.5%. This numerical representation infuses a sense of urgency and importance for endeavors related to prevention, early diagnosis, and advancements in the treatment of the disease. It presents a compelling narrative around the need for better health strategies, improved public awareness, and stronger medical initiatives to challenge the severity of stomach cancer, anchor its progress, and enhance the survival prospects for patients worldwide.

The overall rate of stomach cancer has dropped by about 1.5% each year over the last 10 years.

In the intricate world of stomach cancer research, statistics often perform an illuminating role. The insight that ‘The overall rate of stomach cancer has dropped by about 1.5% each year over the last 10 years’ offers a vigorous ray of hope. It introduces a valuable element of perspective into our understanding of the disease progression, informing us that we are not dealing with a static issue. The declining trend provides proof that advancements in medical research, improved diagnostics, and possibly lifestyle changes are bearing fruit in the battle against stomach cancer. This consistent reduction serves as a beacon, guiding scientists and doctors on their continued journey towards a future where this disease is no longer a major threat to global health.

About 6 out of 10 people diagnosed with stomach cancer each year are 65 or older.

Painting a vivid picture of the age demographic most impacted by stomach cancer, the statistic reveals that about 60% of those diagnosed fall into the age group of 65 and older. This critical piece of data underscores, in an age-related perspective, the stark reality of stomach cancer prevalence. It serves as a vital pointer towards determining risk factors, shaping preventive strategies, and formulating healthcare policies. Furthermore, knowing this statistic compels the medical community and society at large to prioritize targeted interventions, potentially improving early detection and treatment success rates for this critical age group.

Conclusion

Thorough analysis of stomach cancer statistics reveals that it is a serious global health concern, particularly high in regions like East Asia. Although survival rates have improved significantly over the years, thanks to early detection and advanced treatment methods, stomach cancer still ranks within the top causes of cancer-related deaths. The ultimate goal should be focused on bolstering preventative measures, promoting early detection through regular screening, and improving patient outcomes through research and technological advances in treatment strategies.

References

0. – https://www.gco.iarc.fr

1. – https://www.www.worldlifeexpectancy.com

2. – https://www.emedicine.medscape.com

3. – https://www.www.cancer.org

4. – https://www.www.cancer.net

5. – https://www.seer.cancer.gov

FAQs

What are the common symptoms of stomach cancer?

Symptoms of stomach cancer can often be vague and can include discomfort or pain in the stomach, unexplained weight loss, vomiting, trouble swallowing, blood in the stool, feeling bloated after eating, and fatigue.

Who is at risk for stomach cancer?

Several factors can increase one's risk for stomach cancer including being over the age of 55, being male, having a family history of the disease, smoking, having Pernicious anemia, certain dietary factors such as a diet high in smoked and salted foods, and infection with Helicobacter pylori bacteria.

How prevalent is stomach cancer?

According to the World Cancer Research Fund, stomach cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death in the world with around 1.03 million new cases diagnosed in 2020.

What are the survival rates for stomach cancer?

Survival rates for stomach cancer vary depending on the stage of detection. According to the American Cancer Society, the five-year survival rate for localized stomach cancer (cancer that has not spread outside the stomach) is 69%. However, for stomach cancer that has spread to surrounding tissue or organs, the five-year survival rate drops to 31%.

How is stomach cancer diagnosed and treated?

Stomach cancer is typically diagnosed through methods like endoscopy, biopsy, imaging tests, and blood tests. Treatment options commonly include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapies, and immunotherapy. The choice of treatment often depends on the stage of the cancer and the general health of the patient.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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