GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Pollution In China Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Pollution In China Statistics

  • Approximately 1.6 million people in China die every year due to health issues linked with polluted air.
  • Over 40% of China's rivers were polluted to some extent by 2013.
  • Approximately 70% of China's total electricity output is generated with coal.
  • In Beijing, air pollution levels were 7 times higher than the World Health Organization's safe limit in 2020.
  • About 19.91 million tons of pollutants ended in the ocean from China in 2018.
  • In China, 20% of arable land is polluted.
  • China produced 27.5% of the world's total CO2 emissions in 2021.
  • As of 2019, the cost of environmental degradation in China was about 3.5% of GDP.
  • In 2020, North China's Hebei province registered an annual PM2.5 concentration of 44 micrograms per cubic meter, above the national standard.
  • In 2018, China was the world's biggest generator of plastic waste, producing about 54 million metric tons.
  • Air pollution in Beijing decreased by about 30% between 2013 and 2017.
  • Around 16% of all deaths in China were caused by pollution in 2016.
  • China's coal consumption was about 4.04 billion tons in 2019, making it the world's largest coal consumer.
  • Around 30% of the global CO2 increase between 2012 and 2019 was due to China.
  • China emitted twice as much CO2 as the US in 2019.
  • Beijing's average PM2.5 concentration in the air was 42 micrograms per cubic meter in 2019, four times the WHO's recommendation.
  • In 2020, Beijing recorded 100 polluted days.
  • Heavy pollution days in Beijing were reduced by 60% in 2015.
  • In 2012, 92% of the Chinese population experienced over 120 hours of unhealthy air.
  • Between 1992 and 2012, China's nitrogen dioxide pollution increased by over 50%.

Table of Contents

As concern for our global environment intensifies, the quantifiable data surrounding pollution increasingly takes center stage. Our specific focus in this blog post is on pollution in China; a significant issue that demands attention due to the country’s rapid industrial growth. We’ll delve into a comprehensive exploration of the most up-to-date statistics, identifying chief pollutants, evaluating their impact, and scrutinizing the measures taken to control this escalating problem. Through an analytical lens, we’ll strive to present a clear and objective outlook on China’s pollution statistics, profoundly highlighting the scale and urgency of this environmental challenge.

The Latest Pollution In China Statistics Unveiled

Approximately 1.6 million people in China die every year due to health issues linked with polluted air.

Highlighting that close to 1.6 million individuals in China annually lose their lives due to air pollution-induced health complications provides impactful testimony of the grave environmental crisis unfolding in the nation. This startling statistic serves as a stark indicator of the strain pollution imposes on human health, indirectly underlining the magnitude of the air quality predicament. Given China’s significant global influence, this disturbing figure underscores the urgency for sustainable development efforts, making it a critical point of focus in the pollution narrative not only domestically, but on an international scale as well, showcasing the far-reaching implications tied to pollution in China.

Over 40% of China’s rivers were polluted to some extent by 2013.

Highlighting the stark reality of pollution in China, the statistic that over 40% of China’s rivers were polluted to some degree by 2013 provides a compelling snapshot of the environmental challenge facing the nation. In a blog post dissecting the pollution statistics of this Asian giant, this figure serves as a sobering wake-up call, establishing a tangible link between rampant industrialization and environmental impacts. The alarming extent of river pollution underscores the immediacy of the issue, necessitating urgent action and interventions for the sustainable future of China and the health of its residents.

Approximately 70% of China’s total electricity output is generated with coal.

Delving into energy statistics reveals a core contributor to China’s environmental predicament. The fact that roughly 70% of the nation’s total electricity output is derived from coal is quite telling. Coal burning is notorious for releasing a deluge of pollutants, including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and particulate matter, which can catalyze an array of health issues. Furthermore, it accounts for a substantial share of CO2 emissions, a primary driver of global climate change. This coal dependency, therefore, encapsulates not only a leading factor behind the troubling pollution levels in China but also a significant obstacle in the global fight against climate change.

In Beijing, air pollution levels were 7 times higher than the World Health Organization’s safe limit in 2020.

Painting a grim portrait of China’s environmental health, the fact that air pollution levels in Beijing escalated to seven-fold the World Health Organization’s considered safe limit in 2020, underlines the severity of the air quality crisis in the country. In the canvas of a discourse about Pollution In China Statistics, this alarming data sends shockwaves, unravelling the scope and urgency of China’s battle against pollution. Not only does it amplify the magnitude of public health risk, but it also forms an unsightly blemish on China’s urban living conditions, with Beijing, its capital, suffering from such frightful contamination. Therefore, in the drama of pollution statistics in China, this is a stark number that steals the spotlight and demands immediate action.

About 19.91 million tons of pollutants ended in the ocean from China in 2018.

Highlighting the jarring fact that a staggering 19.91 million tons of pollutants were dumped in the ocean from China in 2018, underlines the sheer magnitude of China’s pollution dilemma. Not only does this disturbing statistic amplify the seriousness of the country’s struggle with ecological safety, but it also emphasizes the drastic environmental footprint China is imprinting on marine ecosystems. A data point of such nature draws a clear illustration of the profound and pressing need for substantial policies and strategies designed to curb pollution in China. This illuminates the broader narrative of the blog post, providing readers an in-depth comprehension of the urgent environmental challenges China grapples with.

In China, 20% of arable land is polluted.

Highlighting that one fifth of China’s cultivable terrain is tarnished, underscores the alarming incidence of environmental contamination in the nation. As part of a blog post on Chinese Pollution Statistics, this striking figure becomes a stark reminder of the rampant defilement affecting the very backbone of people’s sustenance: food. The pollution on such a vast scale not only jeopardizes agricultural productivity but also raises serious concerns regarding food safety, long-term health impacts for the Chinese population and sustainability of the environment, thus putting both public health and food security at stake. Therefore, this figure succinctly captures the gravity and far-reaching implications of the situation, underlining the urgent need for effective remediation strategies.

China produced 27.5% of the world’s total CO2 emissions in 2021.

Diving head-first into the heart of pollution data, we reveal an unsettling reality: China alone accounted for 27.5% of the world’s total CO2 emissions in 2021. Against the backdrop of a planet grappling with environmental concerns, this insight underscores the massive role that China plays in our shared global atmosphere. It’s not just about numbers on a page, these emissions have tangible impacts on the quality of air, plant-life, weather patterns, and overall eco-system stability. In examining Pollution in China Statistics, this heavyweight figure serves as a dim beacon, revealing the crucial need for change and sustainable innovation on the powerhouse nation’s part.

As of 2019, the cost of environmental degradation in China was about 3.5% of GDP.

The intriguing statistic, highlighting that the cost of environmental degradation in China was roughly 3.5% of GDP in 2019, lends crucial insights for our examination of pollution in the nation. In economic terms, it vividly portrays the stark toll that pollution is exacting, signifying a significant drain on China’s economic vitality. This resource depletion tangibly elucidates the urgency of the situation, marking a compelling waypoint in our data-led journey to unfold the magnitude and implications of China’s environmental woes. It serves as a striking reminder that measured in pure economic terms, the pursuit of unchecked industrialization could potentially backfire, thereby weaving an essential narrative strand for our blog post on Chinese pollution statistics.

In 2020, North China’s Hebei province registered an annual PM2.5 concentration of 44 micrograms per cubic meter, above the national standard.

Highlighting the annual PM2.5 concentration in North China’s Hebei province at 44 micrograms per cubic meter in 2020, surpassing the national standard, draws a noteworthy picture of the immense pollution challenge in China’s industrial heartland. This figure not only underscores the severity of air pollution but also reveals the scale of the public health crisis that citizens face, illustrating the potential perils of industrial growth without stringent ecological controls. Consequently, such a concentration of PM2.5, a particulate matter small enough to infiltrate the human respiratory system, beckons immediate attention and strategies towards mitigating air pollution.

In 2018, China was the world’s biggest generator of plastic waste, producing about 54 million metric tons.

Highlighting the colossal figure of 54 million metric tons of plastic waste generated by China in 2018 provides a striking anchor in understanding the severity of pollution problem of the nation. This standout statistic not only underscores China’s significant contribution to worldwide plastic pollution but also skilfully underlines a pivotal issue they need to confront and control. As an industrial powerhouse, China’s mammoth plastic waste production acts as a vivid symbol of environmental impacts of rapid economic development and consumption. If the nation can map out and execute effective waste management strategies, this could not only alleviate their environmental contamination but also set a noteworthy example for other countries grappling with plastic pollution. In essence, focusing on this statistic injects an undeniable gravity and urgency around the conversation about pollution in China.

Air pollution in Beijing decreased by about 30% between 2013 and 2017.

Acting as a beacon of hope in the dense smog of pollution issues, the statistic stating a significant 30% decrease in air pollution in Beijing between 2013 and 2017 underscores a visible fade in the grey shroud that once consumed China’s capital city. In a blog post dedicated to Pollution in China Statistics, this fact serves as a testament to the potential effectiveness of stringent environmental policies and emission reduction efforts. It suggests that the narrative of China’s long-debated pollution problem can change, hinting at the dawn of a healthier, cleaner, and more breathable future for its inhabitants.

Around 16% of all deaths in China were caused by pollution in 2016.

In a disheartening revelation, circa 16% of all fatalities in the vast landscape of China in 2016 were brought on by pollution. This paints a bleak picture of the severity and deadly impact that environmental degradation has on the lives of people in China. Nestled within the context of statistical exploration on pollution in this Asian behemoth, this number portrays the urgent need for environmental reformations and air quality advancements. As a colossal percentage of the populace succumbs to pollution-related health implications, it also underscores the significance of immediate measures to reduce air pollutants, to ensure the well-being of the citizenry and longevity of the nation.

China’s coal consumption was about 4.04 billion tons in 2019, making it the world’s largest coal consumer.

The statistic underscores a pivotal role China plays in global coal consumption, which is highly indicative of the nation’s contribution to worldwide pollution levels. With a staggering consumption rate of 4.04 billion tons of coal in 2019, China takes the lead in releasing substantial amounts of greenhouse gases and other harmful airborne pollutants. This high usage of coal and the associated pollution can potentially exacerbate the intensity and harmful effects of climate change, not just within local precincts of China, but at an ominously global level. Being cognizant of this statistic, consequently, enhances our understanding of the severity of pollution in China and underscores the pressing need for sustainable energy alternatives.

Around 30% of the global CO2 increase between 2012 and 2019 was due to China.

Highlighting that nearly a third of planetary CO2 upsurge from 2012 to 2019 emanated from China emphasizes not just the gravity of environmental pollution within the nation, but also the considerable global footprint of its industrial might. As a linchpin in the discourse on pollution overproduction, such figure also underscores China’s critical role in impending global climate shifts. So, in any thorough analysis of pollution metrics within the territory, this datum refines our understanding of interplay between national activities and international environmental impact, and potentially guides policy conversations at home and abroad.

China emitted twice as much CO2 as the US in 2019.

The towering statistic that China pumped out twice as much CO2 as the US in 2019 imbues an eye-opening perspective into the escalating pollution crisis in the Middle Kingdom. In the grand narrative of China’s pollution pattern, this statistic amplifies the urgency for immediate environmental reforms. With carbon dioxide being a key player in heightening global warming, the stark reality of China’s astronomical CO2 emissions underscores its pivotal role in global climatic vicissitudes. It serves as a call to arms to environmentalists, policy makers, and everyday citizens to understand the gravity of the situation and the need to implement effective measures to mitigate this mounting threat.

Beijing’s average PM2.5 concentration in the air was 42 micrograms per cubic meter in 2019, four times the WHO’s recommendation.

Drawing attention to Beijing’s startling average PM2.5 concentration in 2019, which stood at a staggering 42 micrograms per cubic meter — a figure quadruple the safe limit advocated by the World Health Organization — underscores the alarming intensity of air pollution ravaging China’s capital. This data point serves as a stark illustration of the grim environmental transition Beijing is undergoing, adding solid numerical weight to the discourse on China’s soaring pollution figures. More worryingly, it quantifies the immense health risk Beijing’s citizens face, turning vague threats into specific, measurable hazards. This figure, in conjunction with other data points discussed, will further prove crucial in highlighting the urgency and gravity of implementing effective pollution control measures in China.

In 2020, Beijing recorded 100 polluted days.

Highlighting the contamination reality, this striking figure of 100 polluted days Beijing endured in 2020 serves as an eye-opener in our blog post about Pollution In China Statistics. This number not only represents the scale of environmental issues confronting the country, but it also illuminates the devastating health and socio-economic implications for the city’s inhabitants. Henceforth, the emphasis on such data undeniably serves to encourage discussions, inspire remedial initiatives, and prompt policy reforms, making the Chinese skies bluer in the future.

Heavy pollution days in Beijing were reduced by 60% in 2015.

Headlining the blog post with the astonishing revelation that Beijing experienced a 60% reduction in the number of heavy pollution days in 2015, reinforces the notion that even amidst the bleak pictures painted by China’s tumultuous pollution saga, there’s room for optimism. This figure not only underlines the efficacy of China’s stringent pollution control measures, but it also shifts the narrative towards a hopeful paradigm whereby dramatic improvements in environmental conditions are not merely feasible, but already underway. Thus, it energizes the readers, offers them a silver lining, and emphasizes that positive change is possible, even in the gravity of an ecological crisis.

In 2012, 92% of the Chinese population experienced over 120 hours of unhealthy air.

The alarming figure that in 2012, 92% of the Chinese population were subjected to over 120 hours of unhealthy air, paints a stark picture of the severity and widespread nature of China’s air pollution problem. Offering a sobering insight, it underscores how the issue not only poses substantial health risks to almost the entirety of China’s population, but also significantly impacts the quality of life. Such a potent illustration of the environment’s degradation invites immediate attention and remedial action; moreover, it undoubtedly adds weight and urgency to the dialogue surrounding pollution in China, compelling readers to comprehend the magnitude of the crisis.

Between 1992 and 2012, China’s nitrogen dioxide pollution increased by over 50%.

Highlighting the dramatic surge of over 50% in China’s nitrogen dioxide pollution from 1992 to 2012 presents a sobering portrait of the serious pollution crisis the country is grappling with. Nitrogen dioxide, an alarming contributor to air pollution, not only jeopardizes human health but also contributes to the formation of smog and acid rain. This substantial increase signals not just an environmental crisis but also a public health emergency, underscoring the urgent need for effective interventions and stronger air quality regulations. Further, it emphasizes the gravity of the environmental challenges China has been facing during the two decades under consideration.

Conclusion

The statistics on pollution in China portray a critical situation, underscoring the magnitude and severity of environmental concerns faced by the country. High levels of PM2.5 and CO2 emissions, markedly linked with industrial operations and vehicular usage, have stretched beyond alarming thresholds. However, recent numbers also signal towards China’s attempts to mitigate the situation. The gradual increase in renewable energy usage and efforts in afforestation reflect a positive trajectory. Nevertheless, for substantial improvements in general health and environmental sustainability, China needs a more rigorous and steadfast commitment to pollution control and environmental management.

References

0. – https://www.www.statista.com

1. – https://www.www.scmp.com

2. – https://www.www.iea.org

3. – https://www.www.bbc.com

4. – https://www.www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

5. – https://www.www.theguardian.com

6. – https://www.ourworldindata.org

7. – https://www.www.cnbc.com

8. – https://www.www.carbonbrief.org

9. – https://www.time.com

10. – https://www.www.worldbank.org

11. – https://www.www.who.int

12. – https://www.www.reuters.com

13. – https://www.www.npr.org

FAQs

What are the main sources of air pollution in China?

The main sources of air pollution in China include emissions from power plants, factories and vehicles, especially those burning coal or diesel, along with construction dust and residential heating.

How does China's pollution level compare to other countries?

China has one of the highest levels of air pollution in the world. Data from the World Health Organization shows that multiple cities in China exceed recommended PM 2.5 concentration levels, indicating severe air pollution problems.

What impact does pollution have on the health of China's population?

High pollution levels in China are linked with a range of health issues, including respiratory diseases, lung cancer, stroke, and heart disease. Air pollution in China causes hundreds of thousands of premature deaths each year, impacting the overall lifespan and quality of life.

What steps has the Chinese government taken to combat pollution?

The Chinese government has implemented various measures to combat pollution such as shutting down pollutant factories, banning the use of coal in some areas, pushing for renewable energy, improving emission standards, and investing heavily in green and nuclear energy.

How has China's pollution affected its surrounding countries?

China's pollution doesn't stop at its borders. Neighboring countries such as South Korea and Japan frequently experience 'transboundary pollution,' where pollutants originating from China are carried over. This can exacerbate air quality issues in these countries despite their own pollution control efforts.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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