GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

New Zealand Mental Health Statistics [Fresh Research]

Highlights: The Most Important New Zealand Mental Health Statistics

  • 1 in 5 New Zealanders is affected by mental illness each year.
  • In 2018/19, 185,015 (3.9%) of New Zealanders contacted mental health services.
  • One in six New Zealand adults (16.6%) have been diagnosed with a common mental disorder.
  • New Zealand’s suicide rate reached 13.93 per 100,000 people in 2019.
  • 50.7% of New Zealanders will experience a mental illness by the time they are 18.
  • In 2019/20, more than $2 billion was spent on mental health and addiction support services in New Zealand.
  • 5% of New Zealanders who access mental health services are children aged 0-14.
  • 55.8% of Māori and 46.4% of non-Māori New Zealanders report experiencing mental distress during their lifetime.
  • About 33% of New Zealanders experiencing high psychological distress are not receiving any mental health treatment.
  • In 2017, mental health conditions were the leading cause of health loss, accounting for 24% of total disability-adjusted life years (DALYs).
  • In the 2018/19 financial year, 13,137 New Zealanders used mental health services due to alcohol and substance use.
  • 175 people died by suicide in New Zealand in 2006 – this rose to a record high of 553 in 2018.
  • $57 million was allocated in New Zealand’s 2020 Budget to provide mental health support for people affected by COVID-19.
  • Between 2016 and 2020, the number of mental health and addiction workers in New Zealand increased by 12%.
  • 33% of New Zealand’s population with mild or moderate mental health needs are not receiving care due to access barriers.
  • In 2019, New Zealand ranked 18th out of 183 countries for suicide rates.
  • The rate of antidepressant use has increased by 36.6% in New Zealand between 2012 and 2017.
  • Mental health is the leading cause of insurance claims in New Zealand, accounting for 24% of all claims.
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Table of Contents

Mental health is an important issue in New Zealand, with 1 in 5 people affected by mental illness each year. In 2018/19, 185,015 (3.9%) of New Zealanders contacted mental health services and one in six adults have been diagnosed with a common mental disorder. The suicide rate reached 13.93 per 100,000 people in 2019 and 50.7% of New Zealanders will experience a mental illness by the time they are 18 years old.
In 2019/20 more than $2 billion was spent on mental health and addiction support services while 5% of those accessing these services were children aged 0-14 years old; 55.8% Māori reported experiencing lifetime distress compared to 46.4% non-Māori; 33% of those experiencing high psychological distress did not receive any treatment; 24 % disability adjusted life years (DALYs) were attributed to Mental Health conditions; 13137 used Mental Health Services due to alcohol or substance use issues ; 175 died from Suicide 2006 rising to record high 553 deaths 2018 ; Anxiety was most common reason for phone calls 2020 followed by depression & loneliness ; $57 million allocated 2020 Budget for COVID 19 related MH Support , 12 % increase 2016 -2020 number workers providing MH&A service &33 % population mild moderate needs not receiving care access barriers . NZ ranked 18th out 183 countries re suicide rates 2018 Inquiry into Mental Heath Addiction found unequal distribution higher rates among Maori Pacific Peoples Poverty 36 6 percent increase antidepressant prescriptions 2012 2017 leading cause insurance claims 24%.

The Most Important Statistics
1 in 5 New Zealanders is affected by mental illness each year. This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of mental illness in New Zealand, highlighting the need for greater awareness and support for those affected. It serves as a call to action for the government, healthcare providers, and the public to come together to ensure that those suffering from mental illness receive the help they need. In 2018/19, 185,015 (3.9%) of New Zealanders contacted mental health services. This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of mental health issues in New Zealand. It highlights the fact that mental health services are being accessed by a significant portion of the population, indicating that mental health is a pressing issue that needs to be addressed.

New Zealand Mental Health Statistics Overview

One in six New Zealand adults (16.6%) have been diagnosed with a common mental disorder.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of mental health issues in New Zealand. It highlights the need for greater awareness and understanding of mental health, as well as the need for more resources to be devoted to mental health services. It also serves as a reminder that mental health is an issue that affects all of us, regardless of age, gender, or background.

New Zealand’s suicide rate reached 13.93 per 100,000 people in 2019.

The statistic of New Zealand’s suicide rate reaching 13.93 per 100,000 people in 2019 is a stark reminder of the mental health crisis that is gripping the nation. It is a tragic indication of the struggles that many New Zealanders are facing and the need for greater awareness and support for those in need.

50.7% of New Zealanders will experience a mental illness by the time they are 18.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of mental illness in New Zealand, particularly among young people. It highlights the need for greater awareness and understanding of mental health issues, as well as the need for more resources to be devoted to mental health services and support. It is a call to action for all New Zealanders to take mental health seriously and to ensure that those affected by mental illness have access to the help they need.

In 2019/20, more than $2 billion was spent on mental health and addiction support services in New Zealand.

This statistic is a powerful reminder of the importance of mental health and addiction support services in New Zealand. It highlights the significant investment made in these services, demonstrating the commitment of the government to ensure that those in need of help are able to access it. It also serves as a reminder of the importance of continuing to invest in mental health and addiction support services in order to ensure that everyone in New Zealand has access to the help they need.

5% of New Zealanders who access mental health services are children aged 0-14.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of mental health issues among young people in New Zealand. It highlights the need for increased awareness and support for children and adolescents who are struggling with mental health issues. It also serves as a call to action for parents, educators, and health professionals to ensure that children and adolescents have access to the resources and support they need to manage their mental health.

55.8% of Māori and 46.4% of non-Māori New Zealanders report experiencing mental distress during their lifetime.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the mental health disparities between Māori and non-Māori New Zealanders. It highlights the need for greater awareness and action to address the mental health crisis among Māori, and to ensure that all New Zealanders have access to the resources and support they need to maintain their mental wellbeing.

About 33% of New Zealanders experiencing high psychological distress are not receiving any mental health treatment.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the need for improved access to mental health treatment in New Zealand. It highlights the fact that a significant portion of the population is suffering from psychological distress, yet are not receiving the help they need. This is a concerning issue that needs to be addressed in order to ensure that all New Zealanders have access to the mental health care they need.

In 2017, mental health conditions were the leading cause of health loss, accounting for 24% of total disability-adjusted life years (DALYs).

This statistic is a stark reminder of the impact mental health conditions have on the lives of New Zealanders. It highlights the need for greater awareness and understanding of mental health issues, as well as the need for more resources to be devoted to mental health services. It is a call to action for all of us to take mental health seriously and to ensure that those affected by mental health conditions have access to the support they need.

In the 2018/19 financial year, 13,137 New Zealanders used mental health services due to alcohol and substance use.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the impact that alcohol and substance use has on the mental health of New Zealanders. It highlights the need for increased awareness and support for those struggling with addiction and mental health issues. It also serves as a reminder that mental health services are available and should be taken advantage of if needed.

175 people died by suicide in New Zealand in 2006 – this rose to a record high of 553 in 2018.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the devastating impact mental health issues can have on individuals and communities. It highlights the urgent need for increased awareness and support for those struggling with mental health issues in New Zealand. The dramatic increase in suicide rates over the past decade is a call to action for all of us to take mental health seriously and to ensure that those in need have access to the resources and support they need.

$57 million was allocated in New Zealand’s 2020 Budget to provide mental health support for people affected by COVID-19.

This statistic is a powerful reminder of the importance of mental health support in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. It highlights the New Zealand government’s commitment to providing resources to those affected by the virus, and demonstrates the value placed on mental health in the country. This investment in mental health support is a crucial step in helping New Zealanders cope with the challenges of the pandemic, and is a positive sign for the future of mental health in the country.

Between 2016 and 2020, the number of mental health and addiction workers in New Zealand increased by 12%.

This statistic is a testament to the progress New Zealand has made in addressing mental health and addiction issues. It shows that the country is taking steps to ensure that those in need of mental health and addiction services have access to the care they need. This is an encouraging sign that New Zealand is taking the issue of mental health seriously and is committed to providing the necessary resources to those who need it.

33% of New Zealand’s population with mild or moderate mental health needs are not receiving care due to access barriers.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the reality that many New Zealanders with mild or moderate mental health needs are not receiving the care they need due to access barriers. It highlights the need for greater access to mental health services and resources in order to ensure that all New Zealanders can receive the care they need.

In 2019, New Zealand ranked 18th out of 183 countries for suicide rates.

This statistic is a testament to the progress New Zealand has made in addressing mental health issues. It shows that the country is taking steps to reduce the number of suicides, and that the efforts are paying off. This is an encouraging sign for those who are struggling with mental health issues, and it is a reminder that help is available.

In 2018, the New Zealand Government Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction found that mental wellbeing in the country is not equally distributed, with higher rates of mental health issues found among Māori, Pacific peoples, and those experiencing poverty.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the disparities in mental health between different groups in New Zealand. It highlights the need for targeted interventions to ensure that all New Zealanders have access to the same level of mental health support, regardless of their ethnicity, socio-economic status or other factors. This is an important issue that needs to be addressed in order to ensure that everyone in New Zealand has the opportunity to lead a healthy and fulfilling life.

The rate of antidepressant use has increased by 36.6% in New Zealand between 2012 and 2017.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the growing prevalence of mental health issues in New Zealand. It highlights the need for increased awareness and support for those struggling with mental health issues, as well as the need for more effective treatments and interventions. It also serves as a call to action for policy makers and health professionals to take steps to address the underlying causes of mental health issues in New Zealand.

Mental health is the leading cause of insurance claims in New Zealand, accounting for 24% of all claims.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of mental health issues in New Zealand. It highlights the need for greater awareness and support for those struggling with mental health issues, as well as the need for more resources to be allocated to mental health services. It is a call to action for all New Zealanders to take mental health seriously and to ensure that those in need are provided with the help and support they need.

Conclusion

Mental health is a major issue in New Zealand, with 1 in 5 people affected by mental illness each year and 3.9% of the population accessing mental health services annually. Common mental disorders are experienced by 16.6% of adults, while suicide rates have reached 13.93 per 100,000 people and 50.7% of young Kiwis will experience a mental illness before they turn 18 years old.

In 2019/20 more than $2 billion was spent on supporting those suffering from poor mental health or addiction issues – including children aged 0-14 who make up 5%. Māori and non-Māori populations both report experiencing high levels of distress during their lifetime; however 33% of those with mild to moderate needs do not receive care due to access barriers such as cost or location restrictions. In 2020 Anxiety was the most common reason for phone calls to helplines followed closely by depression and loneliness – showing that support is still needed despite increased funding over recent years which has seen 12% growth in workers providing these services since 2016 alongside an increase in antidepressant use (36%). Mental Health also accounts for 24 %of all insurance claims made within New Zealand making it clear that this remains one our country’s biggest challenges yet there are signs that progress is being made towards improving wellbeing across Aotearoa through initiatives like COVID-19 related spending ($57 million) as well as Government Inquiry into Mental Health & Addiction findings released last year highlighting disparities between different demographics when it comes to receiving adequate care .

References

0. – https://www.nzherald.co.nz

1. – https://www.stats.govt.nz

2. – https://www.drugfoundation.org.nz

3. – https://www.mentalhealth.org.nz

4. – https://www.budget.govt.nz

5. – https://www.hpa.org.nz

6. – https://www.tepou.co.nz

7. – https://www.fmhs.auckland.ac.nz

8. – https://www.radionz.co.nz

9. – https://www.mentalhealth.inquiry.govt.nz

10. – https://www.health.govt.nz

11. – https://www.childyouthwellbeing.govt.nz

12. – https://www.cpag.org.nz

13. – https://www.beehive.govt.nz

FAQs

What is the prevalence of mental health disorders in New Zealand?

Approximately one in five New Zealanders experiences a mental health disorder within a given year, with close to 50% of this population experiencing a mental health issue at some point in their lifetime.

What percentage of children and young people experience mental health issues in New Zealand?

Around 15.6% of children aged 2-14 years and 24% of young people aged 15-24 years are estimated to experience significant mental health difficulties in New Zealand.

What are the most common mental health disorders among New Zealanders?

The most common mental health disorders in New Zealand are anxiety disorders (17.7%), mood disorders (particularly depression, at 9.2%), and substance use disorders (8.1%).

What factors contribute to the prevalence of mental health disorders in New Zealand?

Factors contributing to mental health disorders in New Zealand include socio-economic status, social isolation, traumatic experiences, genetic predisposition, biological factors, and access to mental health services.

What initiatives have been taken by the New Zealand government to address mental health issues?

The New Zealand government has implemented several strategies to address mental health issues, such as the Mental Health and Addiction Inquiry, the Wellbeing Budget (which allocates significant funding to mental health services), and initiatives focused on promoting mental wellbeing and resilience in schools and communities.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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