GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Statistics About The Most Obscure Animals

The statistics about the most obscure animals will likely show a wide range of unique characteristics and behaviors that contribute to their rarity and lesser-known status in the animal kingdom.

With sources from: wwfindia.org, iucnredlist.org, doc.govt.nz, edgeofexistence.org and many more

Statistic 1

Only about 300 Proboscis monkeys are left in the wild.

Statistic 2

There are estimated to be 500 to 1000 mature Sagalla caecilians in the world.

Statistic 3

Atelopus frog exhibits an Population trend of decreasing, putting it at risk of extinction.

Statistic 4

There are estimated to be 500 to 1000 mature Pygmy three-toed sloths left in the world.

Statistic 5

Golden-rumped elephant shrew is listed as endangered, with its population greatly decreasing.

Statistic 6

Only 250 mature Ploughshare tortoises are left in the wild.

Statistic 7

The population of White-bellied heron is estimated to have 60 adult individuals left.

Statistic 8

The population of the Tonkin snub-nosed monkey is less than 250 mature individuals.

Statistic 9

The Northern hairy-nosed wombat estimated population size is around 230.

Statistic 10

There are fewer than 200 Spoon-billed sandpipers estimated to be left in their breeding range.

Statistic 11

There are fewer than 150 Kakapo residing in New Zealand.

Statistic 12

There are approximately 140 Colombian Woolly Monkey left in the world.

Statistic 13

The Hispaniolan Solenodon, a nocturnal insect-eating mammal, is classified as endangered.

Statistic 14

Forest Owlets are estimated to number fewer than 250.

Statistic 15

There are thought to be fewer than 250 Giant Otter Shrews left in the world.

Statistic 16

The Spoon-billed Sandpiper population fell by 88% from 2002 to 2009.

Statistic 17

The population of the Amami rabbit has decreased from 6,000-12,000 in 1970 to an estimated 2,000-4,800 today.

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In this post, we will explore some of the most obscure and endangered animals on the planet, highlighting their dwindling populations and challenging statuses. From the Proboscis monkey with only 300 individuals left in the wild to the Amami rabbit facing a drastic decline in numbers, these statistics shed light on the urgent need for conservation efforts to protect these species from extinction.

Statistic 1

"Only about 300 Proboscis monkeys are left in the wild."

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Statistic 2

"There are estimated to be 500 to 1000 mature Sagalla caecilians in the world."

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Statistic 3

"Atelopus frog exhibits an Population trend of decreasing, putting it at risk of extinction."

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Statistic 4

"There are estimated to be 500 to 1000 mature Pygmy three-toed sloths left in the world."

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Statistic 5

"Golden-rumped elephant shrew is listed as endangered, with its population greatly decreasing."

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Statistic 6

"Only 250 mature Ploughshare tortoises are left in the wild."

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Statistic 7

"The population of White-bellied heron is estimated to have 60 adult individuals left."

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Statistic 8

"The population of the Tonkin snub-nosed monkey is less than 250 mature individuals."

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Statistic 9

"The Northern hairy-nosed wombat estimated population size is around 230."

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Statistic 10

"There are fewer than 200 Spoon-billed sandpipers estimated to be left in their breeding range."

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Statistic 11

"There are fewer than 150 Kakapo residing in New Zealand."

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Statistic 12

"There are approximately 140 Colombian Woolly Monkey left in the world."

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Statistic 13

"The Hispaniolan Solenodon, a nocturnal insect-eating mammal, is classified as endangered."

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Statistic 14

"Forest Owlets are estimated to number fewer than 250."

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Statistic 15

"There are thought to be fewer than 250 Giant Otter Shrews left in the world."

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Statistic 16

"The Spoon-billed Sandpiper population fell by 88% from 2002 to 2009."

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Statistic 17

"The population of the Amami rabbit has decreased from 6,000-12,000 in 1970 to an estimated 2,000-4,800 today."

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Interpretation

The statistics presented reveal a concerning reality of the current status of several obscure animal species around the world. With dwindling population sizes, decreasing trends, and endangered classifications, these creatures face a high risk of extinction. From the critically low numbers of Proboscis monkeys, Atelopus frogs, and Ploughshare tortoises to the rapid declines in populations of species like the Golden-rumped elephant shrew and Spoon-billed sandpipers, urgent conservation efforts are needed to prevent further loss of these unique and vulnerable animals. The data underscores the importance of raising awareness, implementing targeted conservation strategies, and prioritizing the protection of these lesser-known species to ensure their survival for future generations.

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