GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Loneliness At Christmas Statistics [Fresh Research]

Highlights: The Most Important Loneliness At Christmas Statistics

  • 27% of homeless service users spent last Christmas alone, with 37% of those aged 45-54 being the most likely to do so.
  • 59% of 17 students who responded to an Instagram poll do not feel guilty about studying abroad, compared to 10 who do.
  • 27% of homeless service users spent last Christmas alone, with 37% of those aged 45-54 being the most likely to do so.
  • The report reveals that 6 out of 10 homeless people suffer from loneliness, making them some of the most isolated people in society.
  • 1 in 5 Australians feel lonelier during the Christmas period.
  • 1 in 3 adults in the UK say they feel lonelier at Christmas.
  • In the US, 43% of older adults feel lonely during the holiday season.
  • 17% of elderly Canadians experience frequent loneliness during the holidays.
  • 29% of older women (65+) in the UK feel lonelier at Christmas.
  • 25% of people living alone in the UK feel lonely during Christmas.
  • 75% of older adults in the UK felt more lonely over Christmas due to the pandemic.
  • 47% of people in the UK feel the impact of loneliness during the festive season.
  • Last year, 58% of Canadians felt lonelier than they did before the pandemic.
  • 30% of divorced or separated adults in the UK experience higher levels of loneliness over Christmas.
  • Approximately 2.5 million UK citizens aged 75 and over live alone, increasing their risk of loneliness at Christmas.
  • 25% of U.S. seniors feel a lack of companionship during the holiday season.
  • Over half of Irish people (52%) feel more lonely during the Christmas period due to Covid restrictions.
  • In Sweden, 23% of people aged 16-29 and 9% of people aged 30-84 feel lonely around Christmas.

Table of Contents

The holidays are supposed to be a time of joy, but for many, they can be a time of loneliness. According to a survey conducted by the Mental Health Foundation, over half of adults in the UK (54%) feel lonely at least some of the time, and this loneliness is often heightened during the festive season.

In this blog post, we will explore the loneliness at Christmas statistics and discuss how to cope with loneliness during the holidays.

Loneliness At Christmas: The Most Important Statistics

27% of homeless service users spent last Christmas alone, with 37% of those aged 45-54 being the most likely to do so.
23% of people reported feeling lonely in the two weeks before Christmas, with higher levels among younger people, the unemployed, full-time students, single parents, and those with pre-existing mental health conditions.
Over 65s have doubled in the percentage of people showing above cut-off depressive symptoms over the Christmas lockdown as compared to the first lockdown.

Loneliness At Christmas Statistics Overview

59% of 17 students who responded to an Instagram poll do not feel guilty about studying abroad, compared to 10 who do.

This highlights the prevalence of international students in the UK, and the loneliness they may experience during the holidays.

The survey of the Austrian population during the first lockdown in spring 2020 showed that younger adults, women, people without work and lower incomes were particularly affected in their mental health, with loneliness and perceived stress being risk factors for subsequent depression.

People who are already at risk of mental health issues are particularly vulnerable during times of increased stress, such as the Christmas period. This highlights the importance of providing support to those who may be feeling lonely or isolated during the festive season.

27% of homeless service users spent last Christmas alone, with 37% of those aged 45-54 being the most likely to do so.

This is a reminder that more needs to be done to not only address the causes of homelessness, but to also provide support to those who are lonely and isolated.

The report reveals that 6 out of 10 homeless people suffer from loneliness, making them some of the most isolated people in society.

41% of adults in Great Britain were worried about their loved ones, feeling isolated in the festive weeks during the pandemic.

23% of people reported feeling lonely in the two weeks before Christmas, with higher levels among younger people, the unemployed, full-time students, single parents, and those with pre-existing mental health conditions.

The mental health struggles of these groups are not necessarily alleviated by the holiday season, and that their loneliness levels remain consistently high. This is important to consider when looking at strategies to reduce loneliness and improve mental health during the festive period.

Over 65s have doubled in the percentage of people showing above cut-off depressive symptoms over the Christmas lockdown as compared to the first lockdown.

This highlights the need for mental health support, particularly for those who are most vulnerable, such as the elderly, women, single/separated people, low incomes and those who do not partake in any physical activity.

Christmas is normally a significant social ritual where getting together in a group is important for reducing loneliness in elderly people, however, due to the pandemic, this has been made more difficult.

1 in 5 Australians feel lonelier during the Christmas period.

Despite the festive cheer, many Australians are struggling with feelings of isolation and disconnection. This statistic is a powerful reminder that loneliness is a real issue that needs to be addressed, and that it can affect anyone, regardless of age, gender, or background.

1 in 3 adults in the UK say they feel lonelier at Christmas.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of loneliness at Christmas, highlighting the fact that it is an issue that affects a large proportion of the population. It serves to emphasize the importance of taking steps to combat loneliness during the festive season, and to ensure that everyone can enjoy the holidays.

In the US, 43% of older adults feel lonely during the holiday season.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of loneliness among older adults during the holiday season. It highlights the need for greater awareness and understanding of the issue, as well as the need for more support and resources to help those affected. It is a call to action for us to reach out to our elderly friends and family members, and to ensure that they are not feeling isolated and alone during this special time of year.

17% of elderly Canadians experience frequent loneliness during the holidays.

Despite the joy and cheer of the season, many elderly Canadians are struggling with feelings of isolation and loneliness. This statistic is a call to action to ensure that elderly Canadians are not forgotten during the holidays, and that they are provided with the support and companionship they need.

29% of older women (65+) in the UK feel lonelier at Christmas.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of loneliness among older women in the UK at Christmas. It highlights the need for greater awareness of the issue and for more support to be provided to those who are feeling isolated during the festive season. It also serves as a call to action for those who are able to help, to reach out and provide companionship to those who may be struggling.

25% of people living alone in the UK feel lonely during Christmas.

Even in a country as populous as the UK, a significant proportion of people are still struggling to find companionship during the holidays. This statistic is a powerful reminder that loneliness is a real issue that needs to be addressed, and it serves as a call to action for those who are in a position to help.

75% of older adults in the UK felt more lonely over Christmas due to the pandemic.

Many older adults have experienced over the festive period, a time which is usually associated with joy and togetherness. This statistic is a poignant reminder of the importance of providing support and companionship to those who may be feeling lonely, especially during the holiday season.

47% of people in the UK feel the impact of loneliness during the festive season.

Despite the joy and celebration that the season brings, a significant portion of the population still feel the effects of loneliness. This statistic is a powerful reminder that loneliness is a real issue that needs to be addressed, and that it can affect anyone, regardless of age, gender, or background.

Last year, 58% of Canadians felt lonelier than they did before the pandemic.

This highlights the prevalence of loneliness among Canadians, particularly during the holiday season, and emphasizes the need for support and connection during this difficult time.

30% of divorced or separated adults in the UK experience higher levels of loneliness over Christmas.

For some, the festive season can be a particularly difficult time, with the absence of a partner or family member exacerbating feelings of isolation. This statistic is a powerful reminder of the need to reach out to those who may be struggling during the holidays.

Approximately 2.5 million UK citizens aged 75 and over live alone, increasing their risk of loneliness at Christmas.

This statistic serves as a stark reminder of the reality of loneliness at Christmas for many elderly people in the UK. It highlights the fact that a significant portion of the population is at risk of feeling isolated and alone during the festive season, and that this is an issue that needs to be addressed.

25% of U.S. seniors feel a lack of companionship during the holiday season.

This highlights the need for increased awareness and support for those who may be feeling isolated and alone during this time of year. It also serves as a call to action for those who can provide companionship and support to seniors in need.

Over half of Irish people (52%) feel more lonely during the Christmas period due to Covid restrictions.

Despite the joy and cheer of the holidays, many people are feeling isolated and alone due to the restrictions in place. This statistic is a powerful reminder of the importance of reaching out to those who may be struggling during this time and of the need to provide support and understanding to those who are feeling lonely.

In Sweden, 23% of people aged 16-29 and 9% of people aged 30-84 feel lonely around Christmas.

Even in a country with a strong social safety net, a significant portion of the population still struggles with feelings of isolation and disconnection. This statistic is especially concerning when considering the younger age group, as it suggests that loneliness is a problem that is not only affecting the elderly, but also those in the prime of their lives.

Conclusion

The holidays can be a difficult time for many people, especially those who are feeling lonely. The statistics show that loneliness at Christmas is a real problem, and it can have a serious impact on people’s mental health.

It’s important to remember that no one should have to face the holidays alone, and that there are resources available to help those in need. If you or someone you know is feeling lonely this Christmas, don’t hesitate to reach out for help.

References

1 – https://hollowayexpress.org.uk/guilty-of-leaving-international-students-and-the-stigma-over-studying-abroad/

2 – https://europepmc.org/article/med/36802729

3 – https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/18/7/3679

4 – https://www.crisis.org.uk/media/20504/crisis_i_was_all_on_my_own_2016.pdf

5 – https://www.crisis.org.uk/about-us/media-centre/1-in-4-homeless-people-will-spend-this-christmas-alone/

6 – https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/dec/22/christmas-loneliness-great-britain-isolated

7 – https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/our-work/research/coronavirus-mental-health-pandemic-study/wave-9-summary

8 – https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/18/7/3679

9 – https://www.statista.com/chart/23694/covid-19-deaths-in-the-us-by-age/

10 – https://www150.statcan.gc.ca

11 – https://www.alone.ie

12 – https://www.gransnet.com

13 – https://dailyhive.com

14 – https://www.cambridgescholars.com

15 – https://www.researchgate.net

16 – https://www.tandfonline.com

17 – https://www.eurekalert.org

18 – https://www.cipd.co.uk

19 – https://www.aarp.org

20 – https://www.lifeline.org.au

21 – https://www.ageuk.org.uk

FAQs

Why is loneliness at Christmas so difficult?

Loneliness at Christmas can be difficult because the holidays are often associated with family and togetherness, making it more noticeable when someone is alone.

How can I cope with loneliness at Christmas?

Coping with loneliness at Christmas can involve reaching out to friends and family, engaging in activities that bring joy, and taking time to care for oneself.

What are some tips for avoiding loneliness at Christmas?

Tips for avoiding loneliness at Christmas include volunteering, attending holiday events, and planning activities with friends and family.

How can I help someone who is feeling lonely at Christmas?

Helping someone who is feeling lonely at Christmas can involve checking in with them, inviting them to join in activities, and offering emotional support.

What are some activities to do to help combat loneliness at Christmas?

Activities to help combat loneliness at Christmas include attending holiday parties, visiting a local holiday market, or taking a walk to enjoy the holiday lights.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

Table of Contents