GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Must-Know Ketamine Statistics [Recent Analysis]

Highlights: The Most Important Ketamine Statistics

  • Ketamine was first synthesized in 1962 as a safer alternative to Phencyclidine (PCP).
  • Approximately 3% of U.S. high school seniors reported using ketamine at least once in their life up to 2019.
  • Ketamine is on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines, considered the safest and most effective medicines for global health.
  • Ketamine is classified as a Schedule III controlled substance in the United States.
  • In 1995, 0.1% of people in England and Wales aged 16-59 had taken ketamine in their lifetime, but this percentage had increased to 2.1% by 2015–16.
  • In 2020, 9% of students in grades 8, 10, and 12 reported past-year use of ketamine during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • The use of ketamine among emergency department patients increased by more than 2 times between 2006 and 2011, from 21.3 to 47.4 per 100,000 visits.
  • The global ketamine abuse rate is estimated at 0.2% of people aged 15-64.
  • A 2018 survey of emergency physicians found that 98% used ketamine for procedural sedations, and 73% used it to control agitation.
  • Between 2015 and 2019, ketamine-related calls to the California Poison Control System increased by 264%.
  • In a 2016 study, it was found that 6.2% of Chinese college students had used ketamine.
  • In 2017, around 25% of emergency department ketamine administrations in the United States were used for pain control.
  • Rates of ketamine use in the general populations of France and Spain have been reported as less than 1% among individuals aged 15-64.

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Ketamine is a powerful drug with many uses, both medical and recreational. It has been used for decades in the medical field as an anaesthetic and pain reliever, but its use has grown significantly over the past few years due to its potential therapeutic benefits. In this blog post we will explore some of the statistics related to ketamine usage around the world. We’ll look at how often it’s being used recreationally by high school seniors in America, whether or not it’s on essential medicines lists globally, what percentage of young people have taken it in recent years across different countries, if there are any trends regarding emergency department visits involving ketamine administration and more. Additionally we’ll discuss market value projections for ketamine-related products as well as survey results from college students about their experiences with using this substance. By understanding these facts and figures better we can gain insight into how popular this drug really is today – so let’s dive right in.

The Most Important Statistics
Ketamine was first synthesized in 1962 as a safer alternative to Phencyclidine (PCP). The fact that Ketamine was first synthesized in 1962 as a safer alternative to Phencyclidine (PCP) is a testament to the progress made in the field of medicine and pharmacology. It highlights the importance of research and development in the medical industry, and how it can lead to the creation of safer and more effective treatments. This statistic is a reminder of the potential of medical science and the importance of continuing to explore new treatments and therapies. Approximately 3% of U.S. high school seniors reported using ketamine at least once in their life up to 2019. This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of ketamine use among high school seniors in the United States. It highlights the need for greater awareness and education about the potential risks associated with the drug, as well as the need for more effective prevention and intervention strategies.

Ketamine Statistics Overview

Ketamine is on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines, considered the safest and most effective medicines for global health.

The fact that Ketamine is on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines is a testament to its safety and efficacy in treating a variety of medical conditions. This is a powerful endorsement of the drug, and a reminder that it is a valuable tool in the fight against global health issues. This statistic is a reminder that Ketamine is a reliable and effective medicine, and should be taken seriously when considering its use.

Ketamine is classified as a Schedule III controlled substance in the United States.

The fact that Ketamine is classified as a Schedule III controlled substance in the United States is an important piece of information to consider when discussing Ketamine Statistics. This classification indicates that the drug has a potential for abuse and carries a moderate to low risk of physical and psychological dependence. This is an important factor to consider when discussing the potential risks and benefits of using Ketamine.

A 2015 study found that approximately 75% of people with treatment-resistant depression experienced significant relief of their symptoms after just one intravenous dose of ketamine.

This statistic is a powerful testament to the efficacy of ketamine in treating treatment-resistant depression. It demonstrates that a single dose of ketamine can provide significant relief to those suffering from this condition, making it a viable option for those who have not found success with other treatments. This statistic is an important reminder of the potential of ketamine to help those in need.

The European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) has reported that around 25 new ketamine-related substances were identified between 2004 and 2016.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the ever-evolving nature of the ketamine market. It highlights the need for continued vigilance and monitoring of the drug, as new substances are being created and identified at an alarming rate. This statistic serves as a warning that the ketamine market is constantly changing and that new substances are being created and identified on a regular basis.

In 1995, 0.1% of people in England and Wales aged 16-59 had taken ketamine in their lifetime, but this percentage had increased to 2.1% by 2015–16.

This statistic serves as a stark reminder of the growing prevalence of ketamine use in England and Wales over the past two decades. It highlights the need for greater awareness and education about the potential risks associated with the drug, as well as the need for more effective prevention and treatment strategies.

In 2020, 9% of students in grades 8, 10, and 12 reported past-year use of ketamine during the COVID-19 pandemic.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had on the use of ketamine among students. It highlights the need for increased awareness and education about the potential risks associated with ketamine use, especially during a time of heightened stress and uncertainty.

The use of ketamine among emergency department patients increased by more than 2 times between 2006 and 2011, from 21.3 to 47.4 per 100,000 visits.

This statistic is a powerful indicator of the growing prevalence of ketamine use among emergency department patients. It demonstrates that the use of ketamine has more than doubled in a five-year period, indicating that it is becoming increasingly popular among this population. This is an important statistic to consider when discussing the impact of ketamine on the health of emergency department patients.

In a survey conducted by the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation, 81% of respondents reported significant reductions in suicidal ideation following ketamine treatment.

This statistic is a powerful testament to the potential of ketamine treatment in reducing suicidal ideation. It demonstrates that ketamine can be an effective tool in helping those struggling with suicidal thoughts, and provides hope to those who may be considering this form of treatment. This statistic is an important reminder of the potential of ketamine to help those in need.

The global ketamine abuse rate is estimated at 0.2% of people aged 15-64.

This statistic is a crucial indicator of the prevalence of ketamine abuse worldwide. It provides a snapshot of the number of people aged 15-64 who are using the drug, and can be used to inform public health policies and interventions. It also serves as a reminder of the potential dangers of ketamine abuse, and the need for greater awareness and education about the risks associated with its use.

A 2018 survey of emergency physicians found that 98% used ketamine for procedural sedations, and 73% used it to control agitation.

This statistic is a powerful testament to the widespread use of ketamine in emergency medicine. It shows that the vast majority of emergency physicians rely on ketamine for procedural sedations and agitation control, indicating that it is a trusted and effective tool in their practice. This information is essential for a blog post about ketamine statistics, as it provides a clear picture of the drug’s current usage in the medical field.

Between 2015 and 2019, ketamine-related calls to the California Poison Control System increased by 264%.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the growing prevalence of ketamine use in California. It serves as a warning that the dangers of ketamine are becoming more and more real, and that the state needs to take action to address the issue.

In a 2016 study, it was found that 6.2% of Chinese college students had used ketamine.

This statistic is a telling indication of the prevalence of ketamine use among Chinese college students. It serves as a reminder that the use of this drug is not limited to any one demographic, and that it is important to be aware of the potential risks associated with its use.

In 2017, around 25% of emergency department ketamine administrations in the United States were used for pain control.

This statistic is a telling indication of the growing popularity of ketamine as a pain control option in the United States. It shows that a significant portion of emergency department administrations of ketamine are being used to treat pain, suggesting that the drug is becoming increasingly accepted as a viable option for managing pain. This statistic is an important piece of information for anyone interested in learning more about the use of ketamine in the United States.

Rates of ketamine use in the general populations of France and Spain have been reported as less than 1% among individuals aged 15-64.

This statistic is a crucial piece of information when it comes to understanding the prevalence of ketamine use in France and Spain. It provides a clear indication of the low levels of ketamine use in these countries, which can be used to inform public health policies and strategies to reduce the use of the drug. Additionally, it can be used to compare the rates of ketamine use in different countries, allowing for a more comprehensive understanding of the global ketamine landscape.

Conclusion

Ketamine is a powerful drug with many potential uses, both medical and recreational. It has been used since 1962 as an alternative to PCP, and its use in the United States is regulated by the Controlled Substances Act. Ketamine has become increasingly popular among high school seniors over recent years, while also being included on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines due to its effectiveness for treating depression and other mental health issues. In addition, ketamine abuse rates have increased significantly in some countries such as England & Wales and Australia; however it remains relatively low compared to other drugs globally. Finally, ketamine continues to be widely used for procedural sedation in emergency departments across the world despite increasing concerns about misuse or addiction associated with this drug.

References

0. – https://www.www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

1. – https://www.www.who.int

2. – https://www.www.researchgate.net

3. – https://www.www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov

4. – https://www.www.unodc.org

5. – https://www.pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

6. – https://www.www.drugscience.org

7. – https://www.westjem.com

8. – https://www.monitoringthefuture.org

9. – https://www.www.emcdda.europa.eu

10. – https://www.www.drugabuse.gov

 

FAQs

What is Ketamine and what is its primary use?

Ketamine is a medication mainly used for anesthesia during surgeries and medical procedures. It can induce general anesthesia and provide pain relief, and it has an additional role in treating certain psychiatric disorders, such as depression.

How does Ketamine work in the human body?

Ketamine works as an NMDA receptor antagonist in the central nervous system. It blocks the NMDA receptors, which inhibits the transmission of signals related to pain, memory, and learning. It also enhances the functioning of GABA and glutamate neurotransmitters, providing analgesic and anesthetic effects.

What are the possible side effects of Ketamine use?

Potential side effects of Ketamine include dizziness, drowsiness, blurred vision, hallucinations, loss of coordination, vomiting, increased heart rate and blood pressure, and dissociative experiences. However, side effects can vary based on individual factors and the setting in which it is administered.

How is Ketamine administrated?

Ketamine can be administered via various routes, including intravenous injection, intramuscular injection, oral solution, and nasal spray. The route of administration depends on the purpose of use, its dosage, and medical supervision.

What are some non-medical uses of Ketamine and the associated risks?

Ketamine is sometimes used recreationally, which comes with significant risks. When used without medical supervision and control, it can lead to overdosing, addiction, or even death. Additionally, the drug has been used as a date rape drug due to its disorienting effects.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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