GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Infanticide Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Infanticide Statistics

  • Worldwide, more than 50 million abortions occur annually and approximately a quarter of these can be considered as acts of infanticide.
  • In India around 500,000 female infants per year are slain due to gender-based infanticide.
  • In China, the gender ratio rose from 108.5 boys per 100 girls to 117 boys per 100 girls a decade after the one-child policy was introduced, likely reflecting gender-specific infanticide.
  • Of the recorded infanticides in the 19th century England, 64% of victims were male.
  • In 19th century England and Wales, rates of infanticide were reported at around 15-20 per 1,000 live births.
  • Researchers have discovered that among studied Inuit populations in Greenland and Canada, infanticide was widespread, killing between 15% and 50% of all born children.
  • In Pakistan, almost 1000 cases of infanticide were reported in 2010.
  • In Alaska, historical records indicate that infanticide was practiced in times of famine, but it has been decreased due to change in socio-economic conditions.
  • In the late 19th century France, the birth rate was around 25 per 1,000 people but infanticide rate was reported as high as 25%.
  • In the United States, the rate of infanticide overall for the period of 2000–2009 was 159.6 per 100 000 live births.
  • In the African Ivory Coast, researchers discovered evidence of a previously unknown practice of primate infanticide.
  • In Japan, an average of 350 cases of infanticide are reported each year.
  • In Africa, the infanticide rate is highest in the first 24 hours (47 per 1000 live births) after birth.
  • In the United States, neonaticide (killing within 24 hours of birth) is usually committed by young unmarried women who concealed their pregnancies.
  • Studies of 16th-century Catholic Church records from Italy mention infanticide rates as high as 20%.
  • In developed countries, for parents convicted of neonaticide, infanticide, or the killing of a child aged 1 to 14, mothers commit 55%, 64%, and 58% of such homicides, respectively.
  • According to the FBI’s Supplementary Homicide Report, 500-600 infants were murdered in the U.S. each year since at least 1980, which also includes infanticide.

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Infanticide, a disturbing and heartbreaking issue, reflects the darkest shades of human behavior and society. Offering a critical lens into this grim phenomenon, our blog post for today focuses on Infanticide Statistics. The objective is to shed light on worldwide trends, revealing patterns and factors contributing to such acts. Vital to recognize is that data becomes a tool for devising effective preventive strategies and policy responses. Let us embark on this unsettling, yet crucial journey, bearing in mind the importance of our role in creating an enlightened, compassionate society.

The Latest Infanticide Statistics Unveiled

Worldwide, more than 50 million abortions occur annually and approximately a quarter of these can be considered as acts of infanticide.

Highlighting that over 50 million abortions transpire globally each year, with about a quarter potentially qualifying as infanticide, serves as an alarming numerical reality check in a blog post discussing Infanticide Statistics. This potent statistic not only emphasizes the grim extent of the issue of infanticide itself but also the vastness of the blurred lines between abortion and infanticide — a thematic gray area that many grapple to reconcile with. Thus, it concurrently spotlights ethical dilemmas surrounding the value of life, legal definitions, socio-cultural norms and health policies, thereby laying ground for further extensive discourse on the topic.

In India around 500,000 female infants per year are slain due to gender-based infanticide.

Weaving this alarming statistic into a blog post about Infanticide Statistics would underscore the chilling reality of gender-based infanticide in India. By spotlighting how half a million female infants annually fall victim to this brutal inhuman practice, the blog would powerfully throw into relief the societal implications of such deeply entrenched gender bias. This statistic serves as a somber testament to the terrible cost paid by innocent lives in the name of patriarchal prejudices—an urgent plight that demands attention, understanding, and action not just in India, but globally.

In China, the gender ratio rose from 108.5 boys per 100 girls to 117 boys per 100 girls a decade after the one-child policy was introduced, likely reflecting gender-specific infanticide.

The alarming surge in gender ratio from 108.5 boys per 100 girls to 117 boys per 100 girls in China within a decade of the introduction of the one-child policy, potentially mirrors the dark reality of gender-specific infanticide. This compelling statistic not only underscores the magnitude of the shockwaves that national policies can send through demographic landscapes, but also casts a harsh light on the societal implications such as gender bias and the drastic measures some may resort to when faced with policy constraints. Hence, this serves as a grim reminder of the dire cultural and institutional challenges still to be surmounted in the fight against infanticide.

Of the recorded infanticides in the 19th century England, 64% of victims were male.

In the vast landscape of 19th century England, the grim echo of infanticide resonates with an alarming gender skew: a staggering 64% of the victims were male. This figure, piercing in its gravity, serves as an essential lens into the gender dynamics of the era. By presenting this hard-hitting fact in a blog focused on infanticide statistics, readers can attain a more nuanced understanding of the social fabric and gender-related facets of violent crime during this grim period in history. Equipped with this knowledge, they can delve deeper into insights such as the potential reasons behind this heavily tilted gender ratio, thereby helping, to some extent, demystify the complex social phenomena of infanticide in 19th century England.

In 19th century England and Wales, rates of infanticide were reported at around 15-20 per 1,000 live births.

Shining a light on the stark reality of our history, the disturbing infanticide rates in 19th century England and Wales, which loomed at a daunting 15-20 per 1,000 live births, are integral to comprehending the evolution and importance of child welfare measures. While rendering a sense of disbelief and shock, these figures simultaneously create a point of reference to measure societal progress, provoking thought and discussion around historical antecedents, societal norms, and reproductive health policies back then. Amidst the bleak narrative of infanticide, these numbers serve as grim tokens of a past we’ve rightly outgrown, thus intensifying the resonance of such a blog post with its readers.

Researchers have discovered that among studied Inuit populations in Greenland and Canada, infanticide was widespread, killing between 15% and 50% of all born children.

The shocking reveal that infanticide, prevalent among Inuit populations in Greenland and Canada, claimed the lives of a staggering 15% to 50% of all born children offers a grim immersion into a serious issue tucked away in the folds of anthropological statistics. In the sphere of Infanticide Statistics, this data not only lends perspective on the multifaceted facets of Infanticide, but also exposes its disturbing prevalence in a specific ethnocultural context. It underscores the urgency to delve deeper into understanding cultural, socio-economic and gender factors propelling such drastic actions, and the imperative to address them within the rightful framework of human rights, child welfare, and social justice.

In Pakistan, almost 1000 cases of infanticide were reported in 2010.

A single numeral, almost 1000 instances of infanticide in Pakistan in 2010, unveils an unspoken humanitarian crisis lurking in the country’s shadows. For a blog post scrutinizing infanticide statistics globally, it serves as a concrete, disquieting illustration of the inherent gravity and import of this issue. This chilling Pakistani snapshot not only frames the post with an urgent call for thorough investigation, policy change and societal transformation, but also underscores the imperativeness of turning sobering statistics into tangible actions that combat, and ultimately extinguish, this appalling practice.

In Alaska, historical records indicate that infanticide was practiced in times of famine, but it has been decreased due to change in socio-economic conditions.

“Anchoring our discussion about Infanticide Statistics in historical and geographical contexts, the narrative of Alaska provides a compelling illustration. Its historical records register the distressing practice of infanticide during famine periods, an act prompted more by survival than savagery. The promising twist in the tale lies in the significant decrease of this gruesome act that parallels the evolution of socio-economic conditions. This statistic reflects the transformative power of societal progress, palpably demonstrating how improvements in living conditions can positively influence social behaviors and norms, effectively reducing such extreme practices as infanticide. Essentially, such a statistic is both a testament to our past and a beacon for our future approaches against this severe issue.”

In the late 19th century France, the birth rate was around 25 per 1,000 people but infanticide rate was reported as high as 25%.

This intriguing statistic reveals a jarring disparity in late 19th-century French society, painting a poignant picture of rampant infanticide despite a significant birth rate. The strikingly high infanticide rate, despite the birthrate standing at 25 per 1,000 individuals, points to underlying sociocultural and economic factors that may have propelled this bleak trend. This key data forms the backbone of our exploration on infanticide statistics, highlighting the nexus between socio-economic predicaments and drastic actions such as infanticide. It sets a significant historical precedent, allowing us to better appreciate the evolution of society and the mitigating measures put in place over time.

In the United States, the rate of infanticide overall for the period of 2000–2009 was 159.6 per 100 000 live births.

Highlighting the statistic that the infanticide rate in the United States, for the period of 2000–2009, was 159.6 per 100,000 live births, unveils a grim truth that needs urgent attention and action. Albeit disquieting, this figure offers a factual measure of the severity of a serious social issue, encouraging awareness, discussion, and evidence-based measures to prevent such tragedies. Embedded in the sobering narrative of a blog post on infanticide statistics, the strength of these raw numbers galvanizes arguments for policy change and increased societal support structures and also sparks readers to comprehend the need for immediate intervention.

In the African Ivory Coast, researchers discovered evidence of a previously unknown practice of primate infanticide.

Unraveling an entirely new facet of primate infanticide in the African Ivory Coast could induce a seismic shift in our understanding of the severity and global distribution of this unsettling behavior. This discovery, stemming from intensive research, not only adds a fresh geographical dimension to the overarching context of infanticide statistics, but also imbues potential implications for both, primatological studies and broader primate conservation strategies. The revelation brings to light the urgent necessity to delve deeper into primate societies, informing our countering measures against infanticide, and guiding efforts to ensure the sustainability of endangered primate populations.

In Japan, an average of 350 cases of infanticide are reported each year.

Unveiling the chilling reality of 350 average annual infanticide cases in Japan amplifies the gravity of this issue within the borders of an advanced and developed nation. Populating our blog post on Infanticide Statistics with this alarming figure, we intend to shatter the widely held perception of this issue being regional or restricted to certain socio-economic groups. Furthermore, it serves as a catalyst sparking essential dialogues about the underlying societal or psychological factors contributing to this issue’s persistence while emphatically stressing the urgency of dedicated prevention strategies and mental health resources.

In Africa, the infanticide rate is highest in the first 24 hours (47 per 1000 live births) after birth.

Drawing its gravity from the heart of Africa, the daunting statistic – 47 per 1000 live births succumb in just the first 24 hours post delivery – casts an arresting spotlight on infanticide’s grim reality. Within the context of infanticide statistics worldwide, this disturbing high frequency underscores Africa’s dire need for enhanced neonatal care, improved maternal health services, as well as socio-cultural changes. Consequently, it showcases the urgent call for collaborative global intervention strategies, strongly justifying its mention and analysis in the blog post about Infanticide Statistics.

In the United States, neonaticide (killing within 24 hours of birth) is usually committed by young unmarried women who concealed their pregnancies.

In framing the narrative around infanticide statistics, the specific data point concerning neonaticide in the United States introduces a pressing concern. The fact that it’s often young, unmarried women, who have concealed their pregnancies, engaged in such acts provides critical insights. It prompts readers to engage in urgent conversations on societal pressures, sexual and reproductive health education, accessible contraception, holistic support systems, mental health care, and confidentiality in healthcare services. Consequently, it highlights the urgent need for effective strategies to address these interlocking issues and prevent such tragic outcomes.

Studies of 16th-century Catholic Church records from Italy mention infanticide rates as high as 20%.

Highlighting the astonishing infanticide rates from the 16th-century Catholic Church records in Italy underscores the historical magnitude of this social concern. With percentages as high as 20%, the statistic catapults readers back in time and sets the stage for a profound understanding of infanticide as a persistent and globally relevant issue. Consequently, in a blog post about Infanticide Statistics, these numbers help to anchor the conversation in historical realities, enabling comparisons with contemporary data, and driving home the urgency for continued global intervention strategies.

In developed countries, for parents convicted of neonaticide, infanticide, or the killing of a child aged 1 to 14, mothers commit 55%, 64%, and 58% of such homicides, respectively.

In the exploration of infanticide, a shocking revelation within our analysis is a statistic showing that mothers in developed countries are disproportionately responsible for a startling volume of child homicides. Precisely, mothers are allegedly convicted of 55% of neonaticides, 64% of infanticides, and 58% of homicides involving a child aged 1 to 14 years. This disconcerting statistic underscores the sobering reality that the stereotypical image of the mother as the primary caregiver occasionally veers into darker territories. This pivotal data point fosters a deeper understanding of the infanticide issue, helping ignite conversation about the underlying triggers and potential prevention strategies.

According to the FBI’s Supplementary Homicide Report, 500-600 infants were murdered in the U.S. each year since at least 1980, which also includes infanticide.

The chilling FBI’s Supplementary Homicide Report punctuates the pressing reality of infanticide in the U.S., highlighting an average of 500-600 innocent infant lives snuffed out per annum since 1980. In the passionate discourse around infanticide statistics, this stark number becomes central, offering a quantifiable measure of the severity of the issue. Not only does it elevate awareness about the grave problem, it also pushes us to probe beneath the surface, confront distressing questions, and seek effective interventions to safeguard the young lives that are at risk every year.

Conclusion

The analysis of infanticide statistics reveals unsettling insights about societal health. Regardless of geographic or socio-economic boundaries, these instances underline deep-rooted issues including mental health and women’s rights, urging further exploration and intervention. It is essential to implicate comprehensive preventative strategies, provide resources for maternal mental health, and foster a supportive environment for women and children. Truthful and systematic data collection is critical for identifying trends, assessing the efficacy of intervention measures, and making data-driven policy decisions, ultimately aiming to decrease the prevalence of infanticide globally.

References

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6. – https://www.www.ipss.go.jp

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8. – https://www.www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

9. – https://www.pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

10. – https://www.www.livescience.com

11. – https://www.www.jstor.org

FAQs

What is the definition of Infanticide?

Infanticide refers to the act of deliberately causing the death of an infant or a child under the age of one year.

What are some common motives for Infanticide?

Infanticide is often associated with factors such as postpartum depression, unwanted pregnancies, gender preference in societies with a strong bias towards male offspring, and severe physical or mental abnormalities in the infant.

Is Infanticide a global problem or localized to specific regions?

Infanticide is indeed a global problem, but its prevalence differs significantly across regions and cultures. In certain societies and under certain economic circumstances, this tragic act is more common.

How is Infanticide studied statistically?

Infanticide is studied statistically through demographic and epidemiological data. Analysts examine rates of infanticide in relation to factors like socio-economic status, geographic location, cultural norms, mental health services, and availability of contraception or safe abortion.

What public health strategies are suggested to prevent Infanticide?

Strategies include improving access to postnatal mental health services, providing family planning education and resources, promoting gender equality, implementing child protection policies and social welfare support for families in crisis.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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