GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Florida Abortion Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Florida Abortion Statistics

  • In 2019, some 70,000 women in Florida obtained an abortion.
  • In 2014, there were 87 facilities in Florida providing abortion which comprised 6% of all U.S. abortion facilities.
  • 73% of Florida counties had no clinics that provide abortions in 2017.
  • In 2020, 33% of adult women lived in counties without an abortion clinic in Florida.
  • The state of Florida enacted 12 restrictions on abortion from 2011 to 2020.
  • In 2015, there were 76,151 reported abortions in Florida; an increase from 72,100 in 2014.
  • Among teenagers aged 15-19, there were approximately 4,200 induced abortions in Florida in 2018.
  • From 1985 through 2015, over 2 million abortions were performed in Florida.
  • In Florida, 18% of pregnancies excluding miscarriages in 2015 ended in abortion.
  • From 2015 to 2020, a total of 37 pro-life laws were enacted in Florida.
  • Of women obtaining abortions in Florida in 2015, White women accounted for 55.6% and Black women accounted for 29.6%.
  • In terms of gestation, 65% of abortions performed in Florida in 2015 were at 8 weeks or less.
  • The abortion rate in Florida was 20.6 per 1,000 women of reproductive age in 2017.
  • There were 91,960 abortions performed in Florida in 2020.
  • In 2020, out of the total abortions performed in Florida, 44,470 were performed for the residents of Florida.
  • In 2018, Governor Rick Scott signed a bill into law imposing a mandatory 24-hour waiting period for women seeking an abortion in Florida.
  • As of 2018, state law in Florida required abortion providers to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital or a patient transfer agreement.
  • Women comprising less than 15% of Florida’s population had nearly 63% of the state’s abortions in 2015.
  • The number of abortions in Florida declined 12.9% between 2014 and 2018.
  • 94% of Florida abortions in 2016 were performed in clinics, 5% were performed in hospitals, and 1% were performed in physician’s offices.

Table of Contents

Welcome to a deep dive into the fascinating world of numerical data, with a specific focus today on abortion statistics in the state of Florida. This blog post will unpack the complexities and nuances of these numbers, striving to provide an objective insight into the prevailing trends, tendencies, and demographic factors pertaining to abortions in Florida. Whether you’re a researcher, student, policy maker, or just someone interested in understanding this intricate subject, we promise to deliver an informative and comprehensive exploration of the data.

The Latest Florida Abortion Statistics Unveiled

In 2019, some 70,000 women in Florida obtained an abortion.

Highlighting that approximately 70,000 women in Florida obtained an abortion in 2019 paints a tangible picture of the scale and pervasiveness of this issue within the state. As such, it serves as a compelling pivot point in a blog post focusing on Florida abortion statistics. This datum not only underscores the gauging people’s attitudes towards abortion and reproductive health policy but also helps in pinpointing shifts in behavior, assessing the impact of legislative measures, and guiding healthcare support and services. It’s indispensable in facilitating discussions both about individual choice and societal responsibilities.

In 2014, there were 87 facilities in Florida providing abortion which comprised 6% of all U.S. abortion facilities.

Highlighting the fact that Florida beefed up 87 establishments rendering abortion services in 2014, which formed 6% of abortion facilities nation-wide, augments the whole perspective on Florida’s abortion statistics. It tosses a spotlight onto Florida’s role in the broader national context and its contribution to making these services accessible, bringing into focus the level of availability of abortion services in the state. This numerical reveal engenders a deeper comprehension of the state’s stand on reproductive health services, fostering a better understanding of the associated trends and patterns in this particular blog post about Florida Abortion Statistics.

73% of Florida counties had no clinics that provide abortions in 2017.

In the landscape of Florida’s complex reproductive health dynamics, the notable statistic of 73% of counties lacking abortion-providing clinics in 2017 underscores pressing disparities in access. This data paints a challenging picture of geographical disparities and potential barriers impacting those seeking abortions, central to a comprehensive understanding of Florida’s abortion statistics. It intimates vast distances that Floridians might need to travel to reach a clinic and denotes a shortage in local healthcare resources, which could significantly influence abortion rates, late-term procedures, and overall reproductive health decisions within the state.

In 2020, 33% of adult women lived in counties without an abortion clinic in Florida.

Highlighting the statistic ‘In 2020, 33% of adult women resided in counties without an abortion clinic in Florida’ underscores the geographical hindrances women encounter in accessing abortion services. It subtly hints at the broader landscape of reproductive healthcare disparities in Florida, where a substantial percentage of women confront logistical, transportation-related, and potentially financial barriers when seeking abortion care. This statistic is instrumental in understanding the challenges many Floridian women face in exercising their reproductive rights, the unraveling of which is fundamental to our dialogue on Florida Abortion Statistics.

The state of Florida enacted 12 restrictions on abortion from 2011 to 2020.

Shedding light on the evolving landscape of women’s reproductive rights in Florida, the fact that twelve abortion restrictions were implemented from 2011 to 2020 strikes a significant note in understanding the broader abortion statistics. This numerical disclosure not only highlights a trending trajectory towards the conservative lens in Florida’s legislative ethos but also influences the accessibility and sociopolitical undertones of abortion services in the state. The ramifications of these laws, in turn, shape the attitudes, decisions, and experiences of women, thereby directly impacting the abortion statistics presented in the research.

In 2015, there were 76,151 reported abortions in Florida; an increase from 72,100 in 2014.

Highlighting the statistic of rising abortion counts from 72,100 in 2014 to 76,151 in 2015 in Florida is crucial in our understanding of the blog post on Florida Abortion Statistics. This upward shift punctuates not just a numerical increase, but also possibly reflects alterations in societal attitudes, efficacy of birth control methods, the reach of sexual education, health policy changes, or the accessibility of abortion services. By placing this statistic in context, it fosters a nuanced conversation on the multifaceted elements shaping reproductive health trends in Florida.

Among teenagers aged 15-19, there were approximately 4,200 induced abortions in Florida in 2018.

Highlighting the figure of around 4,200 induced abortions among teenagers aged 15-19 in Florida in 2018, furnishes a critical insight into the prevalence of teenage pregnancy and the associated choices made by this population in the state. This figure holds relevance to the discourse on sexual education, birth control, and societal norms impacting teenagers. Furthermore, an understanding of this statistic also underlines the importance of making resources and support systems accessible for sexual health among teenagers. This, in a larger context, noticeably punctuates the narrative of the blog post on Florida Abortion Statistics, demonstrating the magnitude and implications of the issue within the adolescent segment of the population.

From 1985 through 2015, over 2 million abortions were performed in Florida.

With an audacious insight into Florida’s reproductive health narrative, the staggering figure of over 2 million abortions performed from 1985 through 2015 fundamentally underscores the intricate pattern of abortion practice in the state. This data-point, drawn from a 30-year period, not only punctuates the enduring conversation on women’s rights and access to healthcare but also serves as a matrix to understand societal, demographic, and legislative contributions to Florida’s abortion landscape. Hence, within the backdrop of a blog post on Florida’s abortion statistics, this statistic plays a crucial role, magnifying the magnitude of abortions while creating a point of departure to explore the factors influencing these numbers.

In Florida, 18% of pregnancies excluding miscarriages in 2015 ended in abortion.

A deep dive into Florida’s reproductive health landscape on a blog post about Florida Abortion Statistics would be incomplete without considering the raw numbers. For instance, the statistic that 18% of pregnancies, excluding miscarriages, in 2015 ended in abortion effectively punctuates Florida’s dialog on pregnancy outcomes. It gives a quantifiable perspective on the frequency of abortions, hinting at the diverse narratives of decision-making by those pregnant. Additionally, it raises questions about access to, education on, and utilization of contraception. Also, it offers a critical data point to public health officials, policymakers, community leaders, and health educators in shaping strategies for reproductive health programming.

From 2015 to 2020, a total of 37 pro-life laws were enacted in Florida.

In the context of a blog post about Florida Abortion Statistics, the enactment of 37 pro-life laws between 2015 and 2020 paints a vivid picture of Florida’s shifting legislative landscape with regards to reproductive rights. This significant number implies a concerted effort to regulate or restrict abortion access, indicating the increasing influence of pro-life advocacy in the state’s policy-making process. Consequently, this trend potentially alters the dynamics of abortion services in Florida — a critical point to consider when analyzing the state’s abortion statistics and discerning the societal, legal, and medical complexities surrounding this topic.

Of women obtaining abortions in Florida in 2015, White women accounted for 55.6% and Black women accounted for 29.6%.

The data detailing the racial distribution of women accessing abortions in Florida in 2015 offers an intriguing perspective on the intersection of reproductive healthcare and racial demographics. Notably, the representation of White women at 55.6% and Black women at 29.6% provides insight into the patterns of access, choices, and potential disparities present within Florida’s healthcare landscape. It serves as a basis for further research and discussion on the influencing factors; encompassing aspects such as socioeconomic conditions, education, and access to contraception. Hence, these statistics play a pivotal role in painting a vivid picture of reproductive health decisions within the state’s diverse population.

In terms of gestation, 65% of abortions performed in Florida in 2015 were at 8 weeks or less.

Shedding light on the delicate spectrum of abortion timelines, the figure revealing that 65% of abortions in Florida in 2015 were carried out at 8 weeks or less, significantly humanizes the data. It underscores the proclivity for early term procedures, possibly indicating a prevalent awareness about expedited decision-making or access to medical facilities. This operative detail elucidates the discussion around abortion trends in Florida, enriching our understanding of the actions and decisions taking place in this complex medical and ethical landscape.

The abortion rate in Florida was 20.6 per 1,000 women of reproductive age in 2017.

Within the Florida Abortion Statistics blog post, the statistic that highlights a rate of 20.6 abortions per 1,000 women of reproductive age in 2017 provides a compelling snapshot of the magnitude of the issue. It offers readers a quantifiable measure of how commonly abortions take place within the state, emphasizing the significance and prompting further reflection on the causes, controversies and discussions around the topic. Furthermore, this data can serve as a catalyst for comparative analyses with other states or past years, allowing for a fuller, more nuanced understanding of the overall scenario.

There were 91,960 abortions performed in Florida in 2020.

The statistic of 91,960 abortions performed in Florida in 2020 plays a pivotal role in elucidating the broader picture of reproductive health trends and decisions within the state. Serving as a concrete number, it not only indicates the extent of the practice and its prevalence, but it also becomes a cornerstone for gauging the impact of state laws, healthcare accessibility, societal changes, and educational outreach programs on abortion rates. The blog post on Florida Abortion Statistics is significantly enhanced by this figure, stimulating in-depth discussion, forming the basis for comparative study with other states or previous years, and ultimately fostering a more comprehensive understanding of abortion dynamics in Florida.

In 2020, out of the total abortions performed in Florida, 44,470 were performed for the residents of Florida.

Drilling down the specifics, the datum revealing 44,470 abortions performed in Florida in 2020 exclusively for Florida residents, paints an imperative portrait of the reproductive health landscape within the state. This figure doesn’t merely represent a number, but reflects a synthesis of societal, health, and policy implications in the realm of women’s rights and healthcare accessibility in Florida. More profoundly, it delineates a critical contour for understanding the frequency of this reproductive choice among Floridians, thereby aiding to unravel potential contributing factors such as education, contraception use, insurance coverage, or even the socio-economic status. In essence, it forms an essential yardstick in measuring the state’s progress, or lack thereof, in providing effective sexual education, access to contraceptives, and choices for women.

In 2018, Governor Rick Scott signed a bill into law imposing a mandatory 24-hour waiting period for women seeking an abortion in Florida.

Highlighting the 2018 legislation signed by Governor Rick Scott, which imposes a compulsory 24-hour waiting period on women seeking abortion in Florida, provides a pivotal context to the dynamics of abortion statistics in Florida. This statute paints a vivid legislative backdrop that frames the decision-making process, potentially delaying and impacting the number of women who go through with a termination. Consequently, this can transform the trajectory of abortion data, encompassing rates, frequency and patterns, thereby adding a critical dimension to any discourse around Florida’s abortion statistics.

As of 2018, state law in Florida required abortion providers to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital or a patient transfer agreement.

An examination of Florida’s abortion rules reveals a compelling narrative alerting the reader to a unique regulatory environment. In the Sunshine State, a 2018 law mandates that abortion providers must possess either admitting privileges at a proximal hospital or a patient transfer agreement. This regulation, while impacting the logistical operations and the relationships amongst abortion providers and hospitals, may also influence the accessibility and safety perceptions of abortion services. Therefore, this statistic significantly amplifies our understanding of Florida’s abortion landscape, potentially assisting in deciphering the state’s abortion rates and experiences.

Women comprising less than 15% of Florida’s population had nearly 63% of the state’s abortions in 2015.

Highlighting the stark contrast between the fact that women constitute less than 15% of Florida’s populace yet accounted for nearly 63% of the state’s abortions in 2015 serves as a sobering revelation into the hard reality of the prevailing abortion scenario in the state. The gaping disproportion sheds light on the gravity of the issue, underlining that despite being a considerably small fraction of the overall population, women in Florida wrestle disproportionately with complex ethical, legal, and health-related decisions associated with abortion. This contradiction beckons a more profound investigation into the societal, economic, or healthcare factors propelling such an incongruity in the Sunshine State.

The number of abortions in Florida declined 12.9% between 2014 and 2018.

Illuminating a significant trend in Florida’s reproductive health landscape, the 12.9% decrease in abortion rates between 2014 and 2018 serves as a testament to the dynamics of policy, education, and societal perspectives around abortion. Embedded within this figure are potential deliberations on the effectiveness of sexual education programs, legislative changes impacting access to abortion services, as well as shifts in social attitudes towards unplanned pregnancies. Therefore, this statistic functions as a critical touchstone in comprehending, benchmarking, and critically discussing the evolution of abortion prevalence within the state – a necessary pivot in any deliberation on Florida’s abortion statistics.

94% of Florida abortions in 2016 were performed in clinics, 5% were performed in hospitals, and 1% were performed in physician’s offices.

Peeling back the layers of the statistic, we unearth a profound narrative on the venue for Florida abortions in 2016. It underscores a staggering 94% majority of such procedures being performed in clinics, with a minimal 5% taking place in hospitals and a minuscule 1% in physician’s offices. This data punctuates how the majority of women in Florida access abortion services primarily through clinics. This could be attributed to a myriad of factors such as lower costs, greater accessibility, or perceived privacy. Thus, the distribution paints an implicit picture of the health infrastructure and possibly the socio-economic dynamics influencing where these services are sought in Florida, all of which are vital for understanding the broader landscape of abortion statistics in Florida.

Conclusion

The current statistics regarding abortions in Florida present a nuanced picture of reproductive health in the state. It’s evident from the data that a multitude of personal, socio-economic, and policy factors contribute to the decision of abortion. As we delve deeper into these statistics, it’s crucial to remember the individual experiences and circumstances that make up these numbers. As such, developing an informed perspective on abortion necessitates transparency, empathy, and an understanding of these complex dynamics.

References

0. – https://www.abort73.com

1. – https://www.www.flhealthcharts.com

2. – https://www.www.floridahealth.gov

3. – https://www.www.kff.org

4. – https://www.www.cdc.gov

5. – https://www.www.guttmacher.org

6. – https://www.www.americansunitedforlife.org

7. – https://www.www.reuters.com

FAQs

What is the legality status of abortions in Florida?

Abortion in Florida is legal. It is allowed up to 24 weeks of pregnancy, and under specific circumstances, such as serious health risks to the mother, they can be performed after 24 weeks.

Is there any mandatory waiting period for an abortion in Florida?

Yes, Florida laws require a mandatory 24-hour waiting period. This means that after a woman's first appointment, she must wait 24 hours before the procedure is provided.

Are minors allowed to have an abortion without parental consent in Florida?

No, Florida law mandates that one parent must be notified before an abortion is provided to a minor.

How many abortions are performed in Florida each year?

The exact number of abortions performed varies from year to year. According to the latest data from the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration, there were approximately 70,000 abortions performed in Florida in 2020.

What is the percent of unintended pregnancies resulting in abortion in Florida?

The percentage of unintended pregnancies resulting in abortion varies greatly depending on various factors, and specific statistics can be difficult to obtain. However, according to the Guttmacher Institute, in 2014, approximately 32% of unintended pregnancies in Florida (excluding miscarriages) ended in abortion.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

Table of Contents