GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Female Abduction Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Female Abduction Statistics

  • Eighty percent of missing person cases reported in South Africa in the fiscal year 2017/18 were female.
  • According to a survey by The National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) in 2016, a child goes missing in India every eight minutes, and almost 40% of those children haven't been found.
  • Fifty-eight percent of the total missing cases involved women in Nepal, 2018.
  • According to a 2019 report, 23,000 girls were reported missing from Maharashtra Police's in India, making it the state with the maximum missing female population.
  • Sima Wali, co-author of a report on violence against women and an Afghani refugee, points out that an estimated 25% of the refugee women from Afghanistan in Pakistan and Iran are widows, and many have been the object of forced marriages or abductions.
  • In Nigeria, as of October 2016, approximately 2,000 civilians (mostly women and girls) remained in Boko Haram custody after they had been abducted.
  • In Ethiopia, roughly 70% of marriages are believed to be by abduction, with the prevalence being higher, over 80%, in some areas, yet the country only criminalized 'Bride Kidnapping' in 2005.
  • In 2019, 4215 cases of female abductions were reported in Pakistan

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Understanding the alarming frequency and contexts surrounding female abductions is vital for devising comprehensive plans to protect and empower women. The analysis of female abduction statistics provides invaluable insights into this pervasive issue, revealing trends, identifying the most vulnerable demographics, and hinting at possible prevention strategies. In this blog post, we delve into the various statistics connected to female abductions on a global scale, aiming to shed light on this pressing issue and explore ways to mitigate and eventually eradicate this social menace.

The Latest Female Abduction Statistics Unveiled

Eighty percent of missing person cases reported in South Africa in the fiscal year 2017/18 were female.

In a striking revelation, the statistic exposes a chilling gender bias against women in South Africa, with a glaring eighty percent of the missing person cases reported over the fiscal year 2017/18 involving female victims. Not only does this paint a sinister portrait of the threatening environment endured by women, but it also underscores the rampant nature of female abductions, attesting to an urgent necessity for strategic intervention. The astounding figure, therefore, serves as a resounding wake-up call, necessitating deeper scrutiny of societal systems, pernicious stereotypes and lax law enforcement culture that ultimately culminate into a dangerous landscape for women, urging immediate rectifications in the system, while endorsing the need for female empowerment as a deterrent to such unwarranted aggressions.

According to a survey by The National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) in 2016, a child goes missing in India every eight minutes, and almost 40% of those children haven’t been found.

Unveiling the raw, disturbing reality of child disappearances, this unsettling statistic from the 2016 National Crime Records Bureau report is a stark reminder of the urgency and sheer scale of the problem in India. Every eight minutes, a child vanishes, disappearing into the unknown – a chilling reality that represents an ocean of individual tragedies. Impressively, nearly half—40% of these lost children—remain unfound. Within the framework of female abduction statistics, this figure casts a harsh light on the magnitude of specifically female child abduction in a country where women and girls often face unique vulnerabilities. This statistic serves as a pivotal touchstone around which we can revolve and deepen the conversation regarding female abductions, thereby illuminating the severity of the issue and emphasizing the necessity for effective strategies and solutions.

Fifty-eight percent of the total missing cases involved women in Nepal, 2018.

Highlighting that more than half of the total reported missing cases involved women in Nepal in 2018 is of vital importance when discussing Female Abduction Statistics. It serves as a stark indicator of the perils that women face, exposing the entrenched gender inequities and issues of personal security. The statistic underscores an urgent call to deepen our understanding of the situation and galvanize actions towards improving women safety, thereby accentuating the gravity and specificity of female abduction in the context of Nepal and potentially resonating on a global scale.

According to a 2019 report, 23,000 girls were reported missing from Maharashtra Police’s in India, making it the state with the maximum missing female population.

Casting a vivid light on India’s startling reality of female abduction, a 2019 report drops a bombshell – 23,000 girls were reported missing from Maharashtra, catapulting it to the unenviable position of the state with the highest missing female population. Such a staggering number amplifies the narrative of a blog post about Female Abduction Statistics, underpinning the breadth and magnitude of the issue at hand. In representing the grim reality of female disappearances in India, this statistic not only alerts us about the extreme vulnerabilities girls face in this region but also serves as a powerful catalyst for influencing stricter government policies, promoting public awareness, and inspiring concerted action against female abductions.

Sima Wali, co-author of a report on violence against women and an Afghani refugee, points out that an estimated 25% of the refugee women from Afghanistan in Pakistan and Iran are widows, and many have been the object of forced marriages or abductions.

Highlighting the experience of Sima Wali, an Afghan refugee involved in reporting gender-based violence, grants greater insight into the traumatic landscape that many female refugees from Afghanistan face. The distressing estimate that a quarter of these women are widowed amplifies the susceptibility of these individuals to predatory practices like forced marriages and abductions, especially in Pakistan and Iran. The grim severity and the widespread nature of these exploitative circumstances are underscored by these statistics, making it an imperative subject in a blog post centered on Female Abduction Statistics. This highlights an urgent cry for collaboration between activist groups, governments, and international bodies in the creation of protective measures for female refugees.

In Nigeria, as of October 2016, approximately 2,000 civilians (mostly women and girls) remained in Boko Haram custody after they had been abducted.

Reflecting upon the striking figure that amidst the throbbing heart of Nigeria’s populace, nearly 2,000 innocent civilians languish under Boko Haram’s custody as of October 2016. Most of these captives are women and girls, an emblem of the pernicious intersection of gender inequality and extreme violence plaguing the region. This data forms a somber backdrop to a discussion on Female Abduction Statistics, underscoring a dire and urgent issue that extends beyond numbers. It breathes life into the narrative importantly foregrounding the silent crisis of female abductions, and challenges us to critically question, explore, and work tirelessly towards advocating for the rights, autonomy, and safety of women globally.

In Ethiopia, roughly 70% of marriages are believed to be by abduction, with the prevalence being higher, over 80%, in some areas, yet the country only criminalized ‘Bride Kidnapping’ in 2005.

The chilling revelation of Ethiopia’s marriage statistics, where approximately 70% are reportedly as a result of abduction, and even surpassing 80% in some localities, indeed underscores a pressing issue, whilst challenging our conventional understanding of matrimony. This shocking state of affairs only started to be addressed legally when ‘Bride Kidnapping’ was outlawed in 2005, transcending a tradition inculcated over generations. In the broader narrative of Female Abduction Statistics on a global scale, this abhorrent statistic, while highlighting the acute violation of women’s rights in Ethiopia, also serves to reflect the magnitude of this issue; unrecognized, unreported, and often normalized within the societal fabric.

In 2019, 4215 cases of female abductions were reported in Pakistan

Capturing an unsettling reality, the figure in question—that a distressing 4215 cases of female abductions were reported in Pakistan in 2019—shines a light on a critical social issue often kept in the shadows. It situates us at the epicenter of an alarming trend, enabling an in-depth discussion on the extent of this harrowing issue within our blog post about Female Abduction Statistics. This data injects urgency into the narrative and underscores the necessity for action and reforms. Further, this statistic encourages thoughtful examination of underlying societal factors, promoting intellectual discourse on preventative measures, government policies, and the role of law enforcement in safeguarding women’s safety.

Conclusion

The alarming statistics on female abductions underscore the profound urgency for strengthened prevention strategies worldwide. While strides have indeed been made in confronting and resolving this issue, the persistent high numbers suggest the need for improved approaches towards safety, awareness education, and regulatory measures. Female abductions are a critical global issue, and it’s incumbent upon us to continue seeking comprehensive solutions to ensure women’s safety and security.

References

0. – https://www.www.aljazeera.com

1. – https://www.www.indiatoday.in

2. – https://www.pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

3. – https://www.www.un.org

4. – https://www.nepal.unfpa.org

5. – https://www.africacheck.org

6. – https://www.www.thenews.com.pk

7. – https://www.digitallearning.eletsonline.com

FAQs

How prevalent are female abductions worldwide?

The exact number of female abductions worldwide is difficult to quantify due to underreporting and differences in legal definitions across countries. However, according to a 2019 report from the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, women and girls constitute 72% of trafficking victims worldwide.

What are common motives behind female abductions?

The motives behind female abductions vary, but common ones include sexual exploitation, forced labor, forced marriages, and in some cases, organ trafficking.

Which age group is most at risk for female abduction?

According to a report by the United Nations, girls under 18 years of age represent the largest proportion of trafficking victims, followed by women aged 18-24. However, women in all age groups are vulnerable depending on the specific circumstances.

What are some preventive measures against female abduction?

Prevention measures include a combination of public education, stricter and well-enforced laws, victim support initiatives, and international cooperation efforts to prevent and prosecute human trafficking.

Is there any particular region that has a high incidence of female abductions?

Female abductions happen globally, but data indicates that Central and Southeastern Europe, Africa, and Asia are regions with high incidences of female abduction. However, this doesn't imply that other regions are immune to the issue.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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