GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

England Crime Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important England Crime Statistics

  • The crime rate in London, the capital of England, is 101.48 crimes per 1,000 people.
  • The homicide rate in England and Wales in 2019/2020 was 11.4 per 100,000 persons.
  • Knife crime in England and Wales increased by 7% in 2018/2019, compared to the previous year.
  • The number of police-recorded shoplifting offenses in England and Wales decreased from around 382 thousand in 2017/18 to roughly 357 thousand in 2019/20.
  • In the year ending March 2020, 43% of crimes in England were closed without a suspect being identified.
  • The number of robberies recorded by police in England and Wales in 2020/21 was 54,045.
  • The number of burglary cases in England and Wales dropped by 9% during the financial year 2019/2020.
  • Rates of motor vehicle theft in England increased 8% from the year ending March 2021, reaching 358 per 100,000 people.
  • In 2019, drug offenses per 1,000 populations was the highest in Cleveland, England, at 26 per thousand people.
  • According to the Crime Survey for England and Wales, there were approximately 5.7 million incidents of crime in 2020/21.
For students, scientists and academics

Would you like to write scientific papers faster?

Jenni's AI-powered text editor helps you write, edit, and cite with confidence. Save hours on your next paper.

Table of Contents

In an increasingly data-driven society, understanding statistics is key to gaining insights into many societal issues. In this blog post, we delve into the realm of England Crime Statistics. Drawing from official records and sources, this analysis will attempt to provide an understanding of the patterns, trends, and implications of crime rates in England. We will discuss various categories of crime, demonstrating their rate of occurrence, geographical distribution, as well as changes over different periods. Whether you’re a policy maker, a social researcher, or a concerned citizen, the forthcoming revelations can help you understand the crime landscape more clearly, supporting informed discussions and decisions.

The Latest England Crime Statistics Unveiled

The crime rate in London, the capital of England, is 101.48 crimes per 1,000 people.

In the dynamic weave of England’s crime statistics narrative featured in our blog post, the figure denoting that London—the country’s capital—has a crime rate of 101.48 crimes per 1,000 people, holds tremendous import. Uncovering the density of criminal activity in the cityscape, this statistic integrates a crucial dimension to our understanding of national patterns, potential risk areas and resource allocation for preventative measures. Furthermore, given London’s prominence as an international hub, this figure doesn’t just echo within the borders of England, but reverberates on a global scale, influencing perceptions and policies related to travel, business, and migration.

The homicide rate in England and Wales in 2019/2020 was 11.4 per 100,000 persons.

The bowels of the England Crime Statistics reflect the intensity of the law enforcement challenge, with the homicide rate standing at 11.4 per 100,000 persons in 2019/2020. It serves as a stark numerical testimony, proof of the severity of violent crimes staining the streets of England and Wales. This potent figure provides invaluable insight into the scale of violence, essentially being a barometer of societal tensions. It fuels critical discourse on the efficacy of law and order measures, while impelling policy adaptive shifts and strategic interventions. Furthermore, it underscores the importance of civic engagement and complements the narrative on the necessity of collective responsibility to tackle crime.

Knife crime in England and Wales increased by 7% in 2018/2019, compared to the previous year.

Highlighting a 7% upsurge in knife crime in England and Wales for the year 2018/2019 magnifies an unsettling trend that underscores the escalating state of criminality in the region. This statistic serves as a red flag to policy makers, law enforcement agencies, and the public alike. It points to the dire demand for effective strategies aimed at not just curbing this specific form of violence, but at comprehensively redesigning our crime prevention mechanisms. Furthermore, this upswing in knife crime, as disheartening as it is, fuels a discourse that could potentially foster strong alliances among communities and their leaders in the fight against crime.

The number of police-recorded shoplifting offenses in England and Wales decreased from around 382 thousand in 2017/18 to roughly 357 thousand in 2019/20.

Drawing into focus such figures as the considerable drop in the number of shoplifting offenses from approximately 382 thousand in 2017/18 to almost 357 thousand in 2019/20, adds a compelling layer to the narrative around crime evolution in England and Wales. It suggests a noteworthy trend that illuminates not only the effectiveness of crime prevention strategies in retail spaces, but also potentially reflects a wider societal shift towards digital consumer platforms and the corresponding changes in criminal activity. This data point enriches the conversation, shedding light on niche areas within the broader crime landscape, which could help policymakers, retailers, and law enforcement agencies in strategic planning and prioritization.

In the year ending March 2020, 43% of crimes in England were closed without a suspect being identified.

As we delve deeper into England’s crime landscape through numbers and percentages, there’s a peculiar statistic that echoes a chilling narrative, highlighting an area of concern. An astonishing 43% of crimes for the year ending in March 2020 remained shrouded in mystery, with no suspect identified. This means, almost half of the criminal offences unfolded into dead ends, an alarming indication of potential inadequacies in crime detection and response strategies. Therefore, addressing this high percentage becomes crucial in forming a comprehensive view of crime resolution capabilities, challenging law enforcement agencies to reassess their operations while serving as a waking call to policy makers and the public, to collaboratively engage in root cause analysis and targeted interventions.

The number of robberies recorded by police in England and Wales in 2020/21 was 54,045.

Peering into the raw, unadorned truth of England and Wales’ crime profile, one grapples with staggering figures such as 54,045, the number of robberies recorded by the police in 2020/21. These numbers concoct a daunting tableau of crime in the landscape, serving as reminders that crime is not a distant concept but lived reality for many. They highlight the perpetual struggle for safety, instigating imperative questions about law enforcement efficacy, judicial overview, and societal conditions underlying criminal behaviors. These figures, therefore, weave a crucial thread into the tapestry of our discussion on England and Wales’ crime statistics, framing a narratives that neither policy makers nor citizens can afford to discount.

The number of burglary cases in England and Wales dropped by 9% during the financial year 2019/2020.

Illuminating a positive leap in the country’s public safety narrative, the 9% dip in burglary cases in England and Wales in the financial year 2019/2020 serves as an integral kernel of information while discussing England Crime Statistics on this blog post. This drop indicates the efficacy of improved policing strategies, evolving neighborhood vigilance, or even the potential influence of socio-economic factors. The decline unravels a crucial facet of crime pattern assessment and offers a glimmer of hope for eventual nullification of such incidents, making local communities safer and laying ground for more secure urban settings.

Rates of motor vehicle theft in England increased 8% from the year ending March 2021, reaching 358 per 100,000 people.

In the heart of England crime statistics, the surge in motor vehicle theft punctuates a significant piece of the crime puzzle that can’t be ignored. With an 8% increase from the year ending March 2021, reaching a staggering 358 instances per 100,000 people, this daunting rise signals a worrisome trend in property crime. This not only impacts the individual victims but also generates a ripple effect on the country’s insurance industry, law enforcement and overall public safety. Thus, these numbers call for a closer look into the factors underpinning this upswing and fuel the urgent need to implement effective preventive measures.

In 2019, drug offenses per 1,000 populations was the highest in Cleveland, England, at 26 per thousand people.

The statistic, showcasing that in 2019 Cleveland, England had the highest drug offenses rate at 26 offenses per 1,000 inhabitants, serves as a potent illustration of regional disparities within England’s crime landscape. This data forms a crucial puzzle piece in the broader image of England’s crime statistics, underscoring an urgent need for policymakers and law enforcement agencies to concentrate efforts in such high-interest regions. The figure spotlights Cleveland as a hotspot for drug offenses, compelling readers to discern the underlying factors that may explain this extreme deviation from national trends and strategize effective measures for crime-prevention in this and similar areas.

According to the Crime Survey for England and Wales, there were approximately 5.7 million incidents of crime in 2020/21.

Unveiling a stark reality about societal safety, the statistic from the Crime Survey for England and Wales highlights approximately 5.7 million reported incidents of crime in the 2020/21 time frame. This not only provides a quantifiable dimension to the intricate narrative of crime in England, but also serves as the heartbeat of our ongoing analysis on England Crime Statistics, infusing our discussion with data-driven insights. With every incident echoing the urgency for effective crime prevention measures, these figures paint a vivid snapshot of the existing crime landscape compelling readers to delve deeper into the nuances of crime trends, their underlying causes, and their wide-sweeping implications.

Conclusion

From the thorough analysis of England’s crime statistics, it’s clear that patterns and trends vary significantly by geographic location, crime type, and time period. Despite a few troubling rises in certain types of crime, particularly cybercrime and fraud, generally, most traditional forms of crime have seen a decline over the past decade. Participating in these crime prevention measures alongside law enforcement authorities will be crucial for maintaining the downward trend. Hence, it’s imperative that individuals, communities and corporations alike continue to stay informed, remain vigilant and actively participate in local and national crime prevention initiatives.

References

0. – https://www.www.ons.gov.uk

1. – https://www.www.statista.com

2. – https://www.www.bbc.com

FAQs

What is the most common type of crime in England?

According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the most common type of crime in England is typically violent crime, including assault and harassment, followed closely by theft.

How has the crime rate changed in England over recent years?

Crime rates have generally fluctuated over recent years. There was a significant surge in some types of crime (like knife crime) in 2018-2019, but according to ONS, there has been an overall decline in crime during the COVID-19 pandemic due to lockdown measures.

Are certain areas in England more prone to crime than others?

Yes, certain areas in England record higher crime rates than others. The metropolitan areas, like London, tend to have higher crime rates due to their dense population and various socio-economic factors. However, crime can and does occur in all regions and districts.

What age group is most likely to be involved in crime in England?

Data from the Ministry of Justice suggests that males aged between 18 to 24 are statistically more likely to be convicted of crimes than any other age group. But this doesn't mean this age group is more likely to commit all types of crimes.

Are crime rates higher in urban or rural areas in England?

Typically, crime rates tend to be higher in urban areas as compared to rural areas in England. This difference is often attributed to factors such as population density, socio-economic conditions, and law enforcement presence.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

Table of Contents