GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Depression In Japan Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: Depression In Japan Statistics

  • As of 2016, it was estimated that around 610,000 people of working age in Japan were suffering from depression.
  • According to a survey conducted among 18,800 students at 69 universities in 2021, approximately 1 in 4 Japanese students has experienced depression.
  • As of 2019, Japan has a suicide rate of 14.9 per 100,000 people, many of which are a result of depression and other mental illnesses.
  • The number of people in Japan taking their own lives rose for the first time in a decade in 2020, with over 20,000 cases reported, wherein depression played a major role.
  • Approximately 35% of Japanese women students have shown signs of clinical depression, according to a study by the National Center for Global Health and Medicine in 2020.
  • As of 2020, an estimated 2.6% of the total adult population in Japan was diagnosed with major depressive disorder.
  • Depression rose by 1.38 times among employees in Japan due to prolonged remote work as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020.
  • The use of online counseling platforms doubled in the year 2020 in Japan, revealing the rising mental health issues, specifically depression due to the pandemic.
  • As of 2021, on an average, one in every five workers in Japan is at high risk of suffering from some sort of mental health problem, predominantly depression.
  • An analysis in 2021 revealed that around 4,235 children in Japan were suffering from various forms of mental disorders, wherein depression had a significant prevalence.

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In our increasingly interconnected world, understanding mental health struggles, such as depression, across different cultures is vitally important. In this blog post, we will delve into the thought-provoking subject of depression in Japan, providing a comprehensive analysis of the statistical landscape. We aim to shed light on the prevalence, demographic trends, societal impacts, and treatment processes related to depression. The statistics explored here provide valuable insights into the depth of this issue and serve as a wake-up call for the urgency to promote mental health awareness and initiatives in the Japanese community.

The Latest Depression In Japan Statistics Unveiled

As of 2016, it was estimated that around 610,000 people of working age in Japan were suffering from depression.

The profound revelation that nearly 610,000 working age individuals in Japan were reported to be suffering from depression as of 2016 does more than just underscore the magnitude of this mental health issue. It serves as a striking reminder of the invisible, yet escalating, epidemic in one of the world’s most technologically advanced societies. The statistic should serve as a siren call to policymakers, mental health professionals, and society at large, shedding light on the dire need for improved mental health awareness, accessibility and delivery of mental health services, and workplace policies that emphasize mental well-being in this insular nation. This statistic, combined with Japan’s notorious culture of overwork, could potentially be exacerbating depression rates – a sobering fact that warrants investigation and urgent action.

According to a survey conducted among 18,800 students at 69 universities in 2021, approximately 1 in 4 Japanese students has experienced depression.

Underscoring the substantial mental health issue facing Japan’s young population, the striking figure that almost one in every four university students, as per a survey of 18,800 participants across 69 universities in 2021, has grappled with depression, illuminates the severity of this problem. Documenting this statistic within a blog post on ‘Depression In Japan Statistics’ is instrumental, as it enhances reader awareness about the often-understated toll mental health deterioration has on the youth and amplifies the urgent call for comprehensive and sustained responses including but not limited to policy reform, destigmatization efforts, and accessible support services in the country.

As of 2019, Japan has a suicide rate of 14.9 per 100,000 people, many of which are a result of depression and other mental illnesses.

Illustrating the stigma shadowing mental health in Japan, the recorded suicide rate of 14.9 per 100,000 people in 2019 underpins the urgent need for more comprehensive mental health support. This figure, predominantly driven by depression and other psychological disorders, provides evidence of the compelling interplay between societal pressures, mental health, and self-harm in the country. When interpreted in light of Japan’s socio-cultural context, it places a spotlight on the persistent issues necessitating focused attention on mental health resources, policies, and awareness. Hence, this intensifies the relevance of an in-depth examination of depression statistics in Japan to devise effective strategies to mitigate this trend.

The number of people in Japan taking their own lives rose for the first time in a decade in 2020, with over 20,000 cases reported, wherein depression played a major role.

Depicting a chilling reality, the reported increase, for the first time in ten years, in suicide cases in Japan during 2020 – surpassing 20,000 cases – underscores the crisis entwining the nation’s mental health, chiefly depression. As an essential facet in the mosaic of Depression in Japan Statistics, such data not only charts a concerning trajectory about the pervasive role of depression but also triggers a powerful call to boost awareness, improve mental health support structures, and implement effective preventive measures. The escalating figures reflect not merely numbers but individual stories painstakingly entwined in Japan’s social fabric, necessitating immediate and concerted action against the throbbing issue of depression.

Approximately 35% of Japanese women students have shown signs of clinical depression, according to a study by the National Center for Global Health and Medicine in 2020.

Highlighting this compelling figure propels the discourse on mental health forward within the Japanese demographic; it underscores that depression amongst women students is not a mere fringe occurrence but an actual impeding phenomenon impacting one-third of this population, according to the 2020 National Center for Global Health and Medicine study. This data point not only adds weight to the topic of discussion, but also emphasizes the urgency to understand mental health concerns and develop effective preventive measures and therapeutic interventions, particularly in young adult, female populations within Japan. This statistic is an alarm bell pushing for more comprehensive mental health policies and increased societal awareness that could help to reduce the stigma and guide affected individuals towards suitable treatment pathways.

As of 2020, an estimated 2.6% of the total adult population in Japan was diagnosed with major depressive disorder.

Highlighting that an estimated 2.6% of the total adult population in Japan was diagnosed with major depressive disorder in 2020 carves out a clear picture of the pervasiveness of depression in Japan. Its implication is emphasized within the context of a blog post about Depression in Japan Statistics, helping readers visualize the weight of the issue and comprehend the scale of its impact on public health. It serves as integral data that can spur discussions about mental health awareness, preventative measures, existing treatment options, and the social-cultural factors unique to Japan that might influence these numbers.

Depression rose by 1.38 times among employees in Japan due to prolonged remote work as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020.

Illuminating a concealed epidemic within the professional world, the statistic of depression escalating 1.38 times among Japanese employees owing to extensive remote work during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 underscores a prompt call for action. This figure conveys more than just numbers—it paints a compelling narrative of psychological struggles in a hyper-connected, yet socially isolating pandemic world. Within the framework of the blog post, it offers tangible proof of the escalating health crisis in Japan, a particularly introverted society stifled further by the shift to remote work, revealing an urgent necessity for increased mental health awareness, empathy, and support mechanisms in companies across the Nation.

The use of online counseling platforms doubled in the year 2020 in Japan, revealing the rising mental health issues, specifically depression due to the pandemic.

The remarkable surge in the utilization of online counseling platforms in Japan, which saw a doubling in 2020, paints an invigorating yet concerning portrait of the escalating mental health crisis catalyzed by the COVID-19 pandemic. In a landscape painted with the brushstrokes of digitization, this statistic suggests the resonance of virtual therapy platforms in attending to the mounting wave of depression needs. It underscores the pervasiveness of mental health concerns stirred by the pandemic and signifies a transition toward digital platforms for counseling and mental health support. For a blog dedicated to highlighting Depression In Japan Statistics, this trend not only adds a contextual layer of the ongoing depression-related challenges but also attests to the changing dynamics of seeking help in a society historically noted for its stigma around mental health issues.

As of 2021, on an average, one in every five workers in Japan is at high risk of suffering from some sort of mental health problem, predominantly depression.

In a tapestry of mounting data correlating depression and work-related stress, the statistic that ‘One in every five workers in Japan is at high risk of suffering from a mental health problem, predominantly depression, as of 2021’ acts as a stark and potent thread. This doesn’t just underscore the alarming prevalence but it enlightens us to how insidiously engrained the issue is in Japan’s populace, particularly its working class. Consequently, it adds urgency to the need for comprehensive mental health strategies, early intervention programs and supportive workplace cultural shifts, delving into the heart of a dire issue that clearly demands immediate attention and action.

An analysis in 2021 revealed that around 4,235 children in Japan were suffering from various forms of mental disorders, wherein depression had a significant prevalence.

Highlighting the stark reality of the mental health crises among children in Japan, the 2021 analysis unveils an alarming number of around 4,235 children grappling with mental disorders, with depression wields notable dominance. This fact serves as potent evidence for the discussion in the blog post about Depression In Japan Statistics, reinforcing urgency for increased public awareness, government intervention, and development of more focused therapeutic strategies. Implicitly, it underscores the necessity to break down cultural stereotypes and stigma associated with mental health issues, emphasizing on creating a society open to discussing and dealing with mental health, especially among the vulnerable group of children.

Conclusion

The increasing rate of depression in Japan is a profound health concern with significant social implications. Statistical evaluations show a progressive surge, effectively underlining the paramount need for comprehensive mental health programs and policies. It is essential to ramp up the efforts aimed at early detection, broadened access to necessary treatment options, and increased public awareness. Most importantly, coping with the stigma of mental health in Japan can lead to more individuals seeking help, helping the nation grapple with this silent yet severe crisis.

References

0. – https://www.insightplus.mja.com.au

1. – https://www.www.who.int

2. – https://www.www.nippon.com

3. – https://www.www.japantimes.co.jp

4. – https://www.www.straitstimes.com

5. – https://www.www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

6. – https://www.asia.nikkei.com

7. – https://www.www.reuters.com

FAQs

What is the prevalence rate of depression in Japan?

According to recent statistics, approximately 2.2% of the adults in Japan suffer from depression, which equates to almost 2.8 million people.

How does the rate of depression in Japan compare to other countries?

Japan has a relatively high rate of depression compared to many other countries. In a comparison of 18 different countries conducted by the WHO, Japan was found to have the third-highest prevalence of depression.

What is the suicide rate in Japan and how does it relate to depression?

Japan has one of the highest suicide rates among industrialized nations. In 2019, about 20,000 people died by suicide. A significant proportion of these suicides are believed to be linked to depression, although exact numbers vary as not everyone who dies by suicide has been diagnosed with depression.

What are the demographics of depression in Japan? Which group is most affected?

Depression is common among both men and women in Japan, but it is more frequent among women. It also tends to affect younger individuals, with the highest prevalence in the age group of 20-39 years old. However, the elderly population (65 and older) also represents a significant proportion of individuals suffering from depression.

What are the steps being taken to address depression in Japan?

The Japanese government has been working on several initiatives to address depression such as early detection and intervention strategies, promoting mental health awareness, and reducing the stigma attached to mental illness. In terms of treatment, both medication and psychotherapy are available and covered by Japan's health insurance system.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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