GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Child Suicide Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Child Suicide Statistics

  • Over 4,600 lives are lost each year due to suicide among 10-24 years-old in the United States. Source
  • Suicide is the second leading cause of death for children, adolescents, and young adults age 5-to-24-year-olds in the USA. Source
  • Females attempt suicide three times more often than males, but males are four times more likely to die by suicide. Source
  • In 2019, 19.8% of high school students in the United States seriously considered attempting suicide. Source
  • The rate of suicide for children ages 10 to 14 has doubled over the last ten years in the USA. Source
  • In 2017, more than 2,200 teens in the United States died by suicide. Source
  • In 2015, about 157,000 youth between ages 10-24 in the USA received medical care for self-inflicted injuries. Source
  • More teenagers and young adults die from suicide than from cancer, heart disease, AIDS, birth defects, stroke, and chronic lung disease combined in the USA. Source
  • 90% of those who died by suicide in the USA had an underlying mental illness. Source
  • Suicide causes more deaths than war, murder, and natural disasters combined globally. Source
  • In Australia, suicide is the leading cause of death among people aged 15 to 44. Source
  • Suicide rates among adolescents in South Africa have increased by 28% in the past decade. Source
  • In England and Wales, suicide was the leading cause of death for both boys (17.2% of all deaths) and girls (13.4%) aged between 5 and 19 in 2018. Source
  • In Japan, suicides among children have hit a record high, making it the leading cause of death among children. Source
  • India has one of the world's highest suicide rates for youth aged 15 to 29. Source
  • In 2017, suicide was the second leading cause of death among young people in Canada. Source
  • In recent years, 20% of all deaths among young people in the Netherlands are due to suicide. Source
  • One third of all suicides committed in Norway are by individuals 15 to 24 years old. Source
  • In New Zealand, suicide is the leading cause of death for 15-19 year olds. Source
  • In 2018, in Ireland, rates of suicide among young males were higher than among young females, with 14.4 suicides per 100,000 young males, compared to 5.2 per 100,000 young females. Source
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Table of Contents

Child suicide is a serious and alarming global phenomenon evoking deep societal concern. This blog post serves as an analytic examination of child suicide statistics, tracking alarming trends, demographic considerations, risk factors, and potential prevention strategies. It underscores the importance of understanding the numbers behind this tragic issue, as these statistics are not just figures; they narrate the silent stories of countless children worldwide. Our aim is to use the power of these statistics to spark a conversation, change perceptions, and inspire collective action to help bring these towering figures down.

The Latest Child Suicide Statistics Unveiled

Over 4,600 lives are lost each year due to suicide among 10-24 years-old in the United States. Source

Highlighting the grim magnitude of over 4,600 annual suicide cases in the 10-24 age group in the United States paints an alarming picture of the mental health issues affecting our young generation. This data functions as a crucial wake-up call in a blog post on child suicide statistics, forcing us to confront the harsh reality and urgency of the crisis. Providing such irrefutable evidence enables us to underline the importance of robust and immediate mental health intervention, raising awareness, and driving action by policy makers, parents, educators and society as a whole.

Suicide is the second leading cause of death for children, adolescents, and young adults age 5-to-24-year-olds in the USA. Source

The startling revelation that suicide ranks as the second leading cause of death among 5-to-24-year-olds in the U.S. serves as a poignant reminder of the grim reality we face when tackling child and youth mental health. It underscores the urgency of addressing this growing crisis, illustrating the profound extent of its impact on our youngest and most vulnerable population. By shining a hard light on this alarming statistic, we accent the importance of open dialogue, early intervention and preventative programs, highlighting where resources and efforts should be targeted to change the course of this heartbreaking trend.

Females attempt suicide three times more often than males, but males are four times more likely to die by suicide. Source

Highlighting the statistic that ‘Females attempt suicide three times more often than males, but males are four times more likely to die by suicide’, adds a poignant perspective to our discourse on Child Suicide Statistics. It underscores gender differences in suicide trends, showing a contrasting spectrum where females have higher prevalence in suicide attempts, yet males exceed in suicide completion. This disparity calls for a nuanced, gender-sensitive approach in preventative measures and support systems catering to our young populace, considering respective tendencies and vulnerabilities. It points towards an urgent need to debunk societal stereotypes, ensuring boys don’t feel compelled to mask their emotional struggles, and girls are equipped with effective coping strategies.

In 2019, 19.8% of high school students in the United States seriously considered attempting suicide. Source

Delineating the chilling reality of child suicide trends, the statistic revealing that 19.8% of high school students in the U.S. seriously considered attempting suicide in 2019 serves as a stark alarm bell. This figure, heart-wrenching in its own merit, uncovers a latent crisis in the mental health landscape of America’s youth, indicating an urgent call for comprehensive, empathetic, and accessible interventions. Situated in the context of a blog post about Child Suicide Statistics, it elevates the gravity of the subject matter, driving home the point that suicide isn’t only an abstract issue, but a tangible threat gnawing away at nearly a fifth of our young population, thus necessitating immediate attention.

The rate of suicide for children ages 10 to 14 has doubled over the last ten years in the USA. Source

Spotlighting the unsettling surge of suicide rates among children ages 10 to 14 in the USA, with a doubling over the past decade, signals a pressing child mental health crisis. This grim statistic woven into a blog post on Child Suicide Statistics underscores the necessity for proactive intervention strategies targeting this youthful demographic. It serves as an imperative call to action for parents, educators, healthcare providers, and policymakers to promptly address this disturbing upward trend in child suicide, focusing on early detection, prevention, and comprehensive mental health support.

In 2017, more than 2,200 teens in the United States died by suicide. Source

Unveiling the somber truth of teen suicide within America, the discovery that over 2,200 adolescent lives were lost to this tragedy in 2017 provides a chilling wake-up call. This figure anchors the discussion in the unsettling reality of adolescent mental health — evidence of a pressing societal crisis demanding immediate attention. It underscores the urgency required in elaborating effective prevention strategies, cultivating mental wellness initiatives, and debunking stigmas attached to psychological health issues amongst youngsters. The raw potency of this fact is a crucial tool in igniting dialogues that are vital to conserve future generations, illustrating that child suicide is not a subtle issue, but a penetrating epidemic requiring action.

In 2015, about 157,000 youth between ages 10-24 in the USA received medical care for self-inflicted injuries. Source

A chilling revelation surfaced in 2015 displaying a disturbing urgency that transcends the realm of health concerns to social awareness – over 157,000 American youth aged between 10-24 were prescribed medical aid due to self-induced harm. In a blog examining the bleak landscape of child suicide statistics, this figure reverberates alarmingly with inescapable implications of escalating mental health tragedies amongst youngsters. It signals an urgent call to action needed not only from medical practitioners, parents, and educators, but from society as a whole, laying bare a stark reality – self-destructive behaviors, possibly indicative of suicidal tendencies, have been infiltrating our younger generations at a rate that we can no longer afford to ignore.

More teenagers and young adults die from suicide than from cancer, heart disease, AIDS, birth defects, stroke, and chronic lung disease combined in the USA. Source

Shining a light on the unsettling truth, the statistic serves as a stark reminder that suicide has stealthily emerged as the silent predator, taking the lives of more teenagers and young adults than multiple physical diseases such as cancer or AIDS. In a post about Child Suicide Statistics, it dramatically emphasizes the urgency and importance of addressing mental health issues among the youth. Unveiling the layers of its tragic implications, the gravity of the situation pushes society towards a crucial pivot – stepping up efforts in suicide prevention, early detection of suicidal tendencies, and providing robust mental health support. It’s not just figures we are talking about here, but lives that could have the potential of a bright future if this fierce crisis is tamed.

90% of those who died by suicide in the USA had an underlying mental illness. Source

Unveiling the omnipresent yet often underrepresented link between mental illness and suicide can be an eye-opening revelation, particularly within the context of child suicide statistics. When we grasp that 90% of those who died by suicide in the USA had an underlying mental health issue, it casts a compelling spotlight on the crucial importance of early diagnosis and treatment of mental health disorders in children. Such a stark figure underscores the urgency of implementing comprehensive mental health education, stigma reduction, and accessible therapeutic resources for children in an effort to disrupt this tragic trajectory.

Suicide causes more deaths than war, murder, and natural disasters combined globally. Source

In the context of a blog post about Child Suicide Statistics, the global observation — that suicide claims more lives than war, murder, and natural disasters combined — sends a strong, resonant signal. It shines a spotlight on the urgency and severity of addressing mental health issues, notably among children. This staggering statistic underscores a silent, often overlooked crisis compared to more attention-grabbing causes of death. As we wrestle with this pressing issue, recognizing its prevalence is an integral step towards shaping potent strategies and interventions that offer timely solutions to save our most vulnerable population.

In Australia, suicide is the leading cause of death among people aged 15 to 44. Source

Plunging into the chilling depths of the startling revelation that suicide tops the fatality chart in Australia among individuals between ages 15 to 44 subtly screams the urgent need for reevaluation and intervention. It’s a heartbreaking testament to the reality that even the most vibrant demographic isn’t invulnerable to the psychological distress that can prompt such a drastic decision. Within the framework of a blog post focusing on Child Suicide Statistics, this information introduces an unsettling but crucial perspective, emphasizing the urgency and relevance of such topic, especially as it pertains to future preventive strategies, psychological support systems, and public consciousness in the context of helping our young population navigate these tumultuous years with the resilience they require.

Suicide rates among adolescents in South Africa have increased by 28% in the past decade. Source

Painting a stark picture of escalating mental health crises among young populations, the chilling rise of reported suicide rates among adolescents in South Africa by 28% within a decade serves as a siren, alarming us all in the blog post about Child Suicide Statistics. It is not just a dreary numeral but underscores the worsening psychological distress amongst our youth, the collateral effects of systemic inequalities or possible inadequacies in mental health care. This jarring statistic commands our attention, urging us to delve into the causes, to address and invest in preventative strategies and mental health resources, making a difference in the lives of these young people who are our future.

In England and Wales, suicide was the leading cause of death for both boys (17.2% of all deaths) and girls (13.4%) aged between 5 and 19 in 2018. Source

The compelling statistic depicting suicide as the leading cause of death among both boys (17.2% of all deaths) and girls (13.4%) aged between 5 and 19 in England and Wales in 2018 carries a profound significance. Within the framework of a blog post exploring Child Suicide Statistics, it serves as an unequivocal call to action. It paints a distressing portrait of the gravity and urgency of the issue, underscoring the necessity to address child mental health. Notably, it opens the door for a deeper conversation about the causes, signs, preventive measures, and potential solutions surrounding child and adolescent suicide.

In Japan, suicides among children have hit a record high, making it the leading cause of death among children. Source

Bringing attention to the grievous reality represented in this startling statistic—Japanese children suicide rates reaching an all-time high—ampplifies the significant issues underpinning this development in our blog post about Child Suicide Statistics. Not only does it underscore the severity of the mental health crisis among the younger generation in Japan, but one cannot dismiss it as a salient warning for other societies. Acknowledging this statistic carries immense value as it pushes for necessary conversations, proactive policy-making, and reinforces the urgent need for focused interventions to tackle this escalating crisis, making this blog post an essential read for those vested in child mental health and wellbeing.

India has one of the world’s highest suicide rates for youth aged 15 to 29. Source

Highlighting the disconcerting fact that India registers one of the world’s highest suicide rates amongst youth aged 15 to 29, reinforces the exigency of contemplating the often overlooked concern of child suicide. In a blog post dedicated to child suicide statistics, this figure paints a vivid, haunting picture of the magnitude of the issue in a populous country like India. It underscores the extreme stressors its young population grapple with, such as academic pressure, familial expectations, societal norms, and lack of mental health support. Drawing attention to these alarming statistics initiates a crucial discourse on mental health, spurring us to break the chains of stigma, deliberate on preventive measures, and push for effective mental health policies.

In 2017, suicide was the second leading cause of death among young people in Canada. Source

Highlighting the alarming reality that in 2017, suicide took the somber position of being the second leading cause of death among Canadian youth, serves as a jarring wake-up call in our exploration of child suicide statistics. This startling piece of information unearths the depth of the mental health crisis among younger people, raising a red flag about the urgency and importance of focused interventions. It underscores the crucial need in taking proactive steps for comprehensive mental health education, prevention and treatment strategies targeted at the affective age group, hence proving to be an eye-opener in our discussion on the blog post about Child Suicide Statistics.

In recent years, 20% of all deaths among young people in the Netherlands are due to suicide. Source

Highlighting that 20% of all youth deaths in the Netherlands in recent years result from suicide underscores the urgent need for intervention strategies. A blog post on Child Suicide Statistics would likely tie this distressing data with the broader international trend of rising youth suicide rates. This notable figure positions the Netherlands as a crucial case study in discussing the factors that could lead adolescents towards such a tragic path. It throws emphasis on the necessity of effective mental health programs, stigma reduction initiatives and other support services to address this alarming public health issue.

One third of all suicides committed in Norway are by individuals 15 to 24 years old. Source

The alarming metric that a third of all suicides in Norway are committed by individuals aged between 15 and 24 punctuates the gravity of the child suicide epidemic, serving as a clarion call for urgent societal and policy intervention. Curbing this harrowing trend necessitates an in-depth understanding of such statistical realities, providing invaluable insights into the tragic extent of suicide in this particular age cohort. In the context of a blog post about Child Suicide Statistics, this figure underscores the pressing need for comprehensive mental health strategies, destigmatization efforts, and supportive networks that specifically cater to the needs of this vulnerable group.

In New Zealand, suicide is the leading cause of death for 15-19 year olds. Source

Illuminating the harsh reality of youth despair, the unsettling statistic that in scenic New Zealand suicide tops the cause of death for adolescents aged 15-19 years penetrates gravely into the discourse of our blog post on Child Suicide Statistics. This cold, hard fact underscores not just an alarming global crisis but also elevates our understanding of youth mental health struggles. Armed with this knowledge, we are in a better position to advocate for improved strategies and intervention measures, thereby raising the bar for mental health dialogue and potentially saving countless lives from being prematurely extinguished.

In 2018, in Ireland, rates of suicide among young males were higher than among young females, with 14.4 suicides per 100,000 young males, compared to 5.2 per 100,000 young females. Source

The eerie disparity between young male and female suicide rates in Ireland, identified in 2018, serves as an unforgiving spotlight on a grim fact within the context of Child Suicide Statistics. It provides a stark indicator of the acute vulnerability of young males to deep-seated emotional and psychological strains, underscored by an alarmingly high suicide rate of 14.4 per 100,000 individuals. This stark contrast with the lower rate of 5.2 per 100,000 in young females prompts an urgent call for targeted mental health interventions and suicide prevention strategies. This glaring evidence shouldn’t just exist in a statistical vacuum but rather should ignite discussions and actions within our societies, to tackle this deeply worrying trend head-on.

Conclusion

A critical examination of child suicide statistics reveals a deeply concerning pattern that warrants immediate attention and action. These numbers reflect a mental health crisis that impacts children at an increasingly young age. It’s clear that a multi-faceted approach, encompassing improved mental health awareness, enhanced support system in schools and homes, and strategic healthcare reforms, is imperative for addressing this disturbing trend. Continued research and data analysis are equally vital to tailor effective suicide prevention strategies for our youngsters.

References

0. – https://www.law.capital.edu

1. – https://www.www.ons.gov.uk

2. – https://www.www.newshub.co.nz

3. – https://www.www.cso.ie

4. – https://www.www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

5. – https://www.www150.statcan.gc.ca

6. – https://www.www.bbc.com

7. – https://www.www.health24.com

8. – https://www.www.cdc.gov

9. – https://www.www.cbs.nl

10. – https://www.www.aihw.gov.au

11. – https://www.www.who.int

12. – https://www.www.med.uio.no

FAQs

What is the prevalence of child suicide globally?

The World Health Organization reports that suicide is the third leading cause of death in 15-19-year-olds. However, the rate of suicide varies across different regions and countries.

Are there observable factors that might increase a child's risk of suicide?

Yes, multiple factors may increase a child's risk of suicide, including mental health disorders like depression, exposure to violence, having a history of self-harm, family history of suicide, and stress factors like bullying, academic pressure, and personal issues.

Is there a gender disparity when it comes to child suicide?

Yes, according to statistics, boys are more likely to die by suicide whereas girls are more likely to attempt suicide. However, these figures may vary depending on the geographical location and cultural context.

How has the rate of child suicide changed over the years?

According to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the rate of suicide among persons aged 10–24 increased by 57.4% in the United States from 2007 to 2018, thus indicating a growing public health concern.

Are there effective strategies in preventing child suicide?

Strategies that promote mental health education, early detection, and intervention, as well as providing support services for at-risk children and adolescents, can effectively help prevent child suicide. Furthermore, reducing accessibility to means of suicide and promoting mental health resources has shown to be effective in prevention.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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