GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Must-Know Soccer Injury Statistics [Latest Report]

Highlights: The Most Important Soccer Injury Statistics

  • Soccer players are 6 times more likely to suffer a brain injury compared to other high school sports.
  • Ankle sprains comprise about 20% of soccer injuries.
  • Knee injuries account for 25% of severe injuries in youth soccer players.
  • Approximately 80% of soccer injuries affect the lower extremities.
  • Female soccer players are 2-8 times more likely to suffer an ACL injury compared to males.
  • The incidence of soccer injuries is higher during competition (35.8 injuries per 1000 player hours) than during practice (7.9 per 1000 player hours).
  • 75% of ACL tears in soccer are non-contact injuries.
  • Youths aged 12-17 are at the highest risk for soccer injuries, accounting for 40% of all injuries.
  • Soccer injuries increase with age, peaking in the 15-19 age group for males and 12-14 age group for females.
  • Hamstring injuries are the second most common injury in professional soccer players, accounting for 12% of all injuries.
  • Approximately 40% of all injuries in soccer are due to overuse.
  • In professional soccer, muscle injuries are the most common injury, representing 31% of all injuries.
  • Goalkeepers are most prone to hand and finger injuries, accounting for 57% of all such injuries.
  • The incidence of injury in female soccer players is 6.1 injuries/1000 hours during games and 2.2 injuries/1000 hours during training.
  • The overall injury rate in collegiate soccer players is 7.3 injuries per 1000 athlete exposures (practice or competition).

Table of Contents

Soccer is a beloved sport enjoyed by millions of people around the world. Unfortunately, it also carries with it an increased risk for injury. In this blog post, we will explore 20 statistics about soccer injuries that highlight just how common and serious these injuries can be. From brain injuries to ACL tears to concussions, we’ll look at the data behind each type of injury so you can better understand what risks are associated with playing soccer and take steps to protect yourself or your loved ones from harm while on the field.

The Most Important Statistics
Soccer players are 6 times more likely to suffer a brain injury compared to other high school sports. This statistic is a stark reminder of the potential risks associated with playing soccer. It highlights the importance of taking the necessary precautions to protect players from the dangers of brain injuries. It also serves as a warning to parents and coaches to be aware of the risks and to ensure that their players are properly equipped and trained to play safely. Ankle sprains comprise about 20% of soccer injuries. This statistic is a crucial piece of information when it comes to Soccer Injury Statistics, as it provides insight into the most common type of injury sustained by soccer players. Knowing that ankle sprains make up a significant portion of soccer injuries can help coaches, players, and medical professionals better prepare for and prevent such injuries.

Soccer Injury Statistics Overview

Knee injuries account for 25% of severe injuries in youth soccer players.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the importance of proper safety measures when it comes to youth soccer players. Knee injuries can be particularly debilitating, and the fact that they account for a quarter of all severe injuries in this age group is a cause for concern. It is essential that coaches, parents, and players alike take the necessary steps to ensure that young athletes are protected from the risk of serious injury.

Approximately 80% of soccer injuries affect the lower extremities.

This statistic is a crucial reminder of the importance of protecting the lower extremities when playing soccer. With the majority of soccer injuries affecting the lower extremities, it is essential to take the necessary precautions to prevent such injuries from occurring. This could include wearing the appropriate protective gear, such as shin guards, and ensuring that the playing surface is safe and free from any potential hazards.

Female soccer players are 2-8 times more likely to suffer an ACL injury compared to males.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the dangers that female soccer players face when it comes to ACL injuries. It highlights the need for greater awareness and prevention of these injuries, as well as the need for better treatment and rehabilitation for those who do suffer from them. It is a call to action for coaches, players, and parents to take the necessary steps to ensure the safety of female soccer players.

The incidence of soccer injuries is higher during competition (35.8 injuries per 1000 player hours) than during practice (7.9 per 1000 player hours).

This statistic is a stark reminder of the importance of taking proper precautions when playing soccer, as it highlights the increased risk of injury during competition compared to practice. It serves as a warning to players, coaches, and parents alike that extra care should be taken to ensure the safety of those involved in the sport.

75% of ACL tears in soccer are non-contact injuries.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the importance of proper warm-up and stretching before playing soccer. It highlights the fact that even when players are not in direct contact with each other, they can still suffer serious injuries. This statistic is a call to action for coaches, players, and parents to ensure that proper safety protocols are in place to reduce the risk of non-contact ACL tears.

Youths aged 12-17 are at the highest risk for soccer injuries, accounting for 40% of all injuries.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the importance of taking extra precautions when it comes to soccer injuries, particularly for youths aged 12-17. With such a high percentage of injuries occurring in this age group, it is essential that coaches, parents, and players alike are aware of the risks and take the necessary steps to ensure the safety of all involved.

Soccer injuries increase with age, peaking in the 15-19 age group for males and 12-14 age group for females.

This statistic is a crucial indicator of the potential risks associated with playing soccer, particularly for young athletes. It highlights the importance of proper safety measures and training for players of all ages, but especially those in the age groups with the highest injury rates. Knowing this information can help coaches, parents, and players make informed decisions about how to best protect themselves from injury while still enjoying the sport.

Hamstring injuries are the second most common injury in professional soccer players, accounting for 12% of all injuries.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the importance of hamstring health in professional soccer players. With hamstring injuries accounting for 12% of all injuries, it is clear that hamstring health should be a priority for any soccer player looking to stay healthy and perform at their best.

Approximately 40% of all injuries in soccer are due to overuse.

This statistic is a crucial reminder that soccer injuries are not only caused by acute trauma, but also by the cumulative effects of repetitive motion. It highlights the importance of taking breaks and avoiding overtraining in order to prevent long-term damage.

In professional soccer, muscle injuries are the most common injury, representing 31% of all injuries.

This statistic is a telling indication of the physical demands of professional soccer. It highlights the importance of players taking the necessary precautions to protect their bodies from the rigors of the sport. It also serves as a reminder to coaches and trainers to ensure that their athletes are properly conditioned and equipped to handle the physical demands of the game.

Goalkeepers are most prone to hand and finger injuries, accounting for 57% of all such injuries.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the importance of protecting goalkeepers from hand and finger injuries. With 57% of all such injuries occurring to goalkeepers, it is clear that more needs to be done to ensure that they are adequately protected while playing.

The incidence of injury in female soccer players is 6.1 injuries/1000 hours during games and 2.2 injuries/1000 hours during training.

This statistic is a powerful indicator of the risk of injury that female soccer players face, both during games and training. It highlights the importance of taking proper precautions to protect players from injury, as well as the need for coaches and trainers to be aware of the potential for injury and take steps to reduce it. Ultimately, this statistic serves as a reminder that soccer is a sport that carries a risk of injury, and that proper safety measures must be taken to ensure the safety of all players.

The risk of injury in professional soccer players is greater in matches (27.5 injuries per 1000 player hours) than in training (5.8 injuries per 1000 player hours).

This statistic is a stark reminder of the dangers of professional soccer. It highlights the fact that matches are far more hazardous than training, with nearly five times the risk of injury. This is an important point to consider when discussing soccer injury statistics, as it emphasizes the need for players to take extra precautions when playing in matches.

The overall injury rate in collegiate soccer players is 7.3 injuries per 1000 athlete exposures (practice or competition).

This statistic is a crucial indicator of the safety of collegiate soccer players, providing a clear picture of the risk of injury associated with the sport. It serves as a reminder that, while soccer is a beloved pastime, it is important to take the necessary precautions to ensure the safety of athletes.

Conclusion

Soccer is a popular sport, but it also carries with it an increased risk of injury. According to the statistics presented in this blog post, soccer players are 6 times more likely to suffer a brain injury compared to other high school sports and ankle sprains comprise about 20% of all soccer injuries. Knee injuries account for 25% of severe injuries in youth soccer players while approximately 80% of all soccer-related injuries affect the lower extremities. Female athletes are 2-8 times more likely than males to experience ACL tears and 75% of metal-related soccer injuries involve those aged 10-19 years old. Groin issues make up 10–18 percent of all reported cases while 1 out every 10 college level athletes will sustain at least one concussion each season; 75 percent being noncontact related incidents. Youths between 12–17 have been identified as having the highest rate for sustaining any type or severity when playing Soccer, peaking around 15–19 year olds (males) and 12–14 year olds (females). Hamstring problems come second most common after muscle strains which represent 31%, followed by hand/finger issues that goalkeepers face 57%. The overall incidence rate per 1000 athlete exposures stands at 7.3 during practice or competition with matches carrying 27.5 per 1000 player hours versus 5.8 during training sessions respectively It is important that coaches take these risks into consideration when developing their teams’ strategies so they can ensure proper safety protocols are implemented throughout practices and games alike

References

0. – https://www.www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

1. – https://www.bjsm.bmj.com

2. – https://www.pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

3. – https://www.www.stopsportsinjuries.org

4. – https://www.www.researchgate.net

5. – https://www.www.dovepress.com

6. – https://www.archive.ahrq.gov

 

FAQs

What is the most common type of soccer injury?

Muscle strains, particularly in the hamstrings, quadriceps, and groin muscles, are the most common soccer injuries.

How can soccer players reduce the risk of injury?

Soccer players can reduce the risk of injury by participating in regular strength and conditioning training, using proper equipment, following a disciplined warm-up and cool-down routine, and avoiding excessive fatigue.

What is the impact of overuse injuries in soccer?

Overuse injuries, such as stress fractures and tendinitis, can lead to chronic pain and may force players to miss significant playing time, potentially impacting their performance and overall involvement in the sport.

Which position in soccer is at the greatest risk for injury?

While all positions can be prone to injury, studies suggest goalkeepers may have a slightly higher risk due to frequent diving, jumping, and repetitive hand, arm, and shoulder movements.

How long is the average recovery time for a soccer player who sustains a significant injury?

The average recovery time for a soccer player depends on the severity and type of injury. For instance, minor muscle strains may take a few weeks to heal, while more severe injuries like ACL tears can require 6-9 months or even longer for a full recovery.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

Table of Contents