GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Open Marriage Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Open Marriage Statistics

  • As of 2020, approximately 4 to 5 percent of Americans are involved in a consensual open relationship, which includes open marriages.
  • A survey from YouGov in 2020 indicated that 20% of men and 16% of women in open relationships reported feeling happier than those in monogamous unions.
  • According to a 2016 study, only 1 in 5 people in open relationships reported feeling insecure or jealous, compared to nearly half of those in monogamous ones.
  • Nearly 10 percent of marriages in the United States are non-monogamous according to data from 2019.
  • According to the same 2016 study, those in open marriages are no less satisfied compared to those in monogamous relationships.
  • An Avvo study from 2015 reported that 4% of American admitted to being in an open relationship.
  • In a YouGov survey, only 14% of millennials said they would consider an open relationship.
  • In a survey of 1,000 adults, Avvo found that only 3% of married people reported having an open marriage.
  • In 2021, a study suggested that about 17% of people under 45 had engaged in sexual activity outside of their relationship with the consent of their partner.
  • A survey by Avvo found that open marriages were more common among African Americans (12%) than Caucasians (7%).
  • A study in the Archives of Sexual Behavior found that consensual non-monogamy, including open marriage, increased by 44% between 1975 and 2014.
  • In a 1983 study, it was found that people in open marriages had a 92% rate of partnership continuation compared to a 75% rate in traditional marriages.
  • According to a Kinsey Institute report, as much as 40% of the population, engages in some form of open marriage or non-monogamy.
  • In a study by Schechinger, Sakaluk, & Moors, it was found that bisexual women are most likely to be in open relationships.
  • According to a 2012 Netmums survey, one in four women would consider an open relationship.
  • An international online survey from 2020 found that about 61% of Italians would reject an open relationship under any circumstances.
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Open marriages, once a taboo concept, has steadily been gaining recognition and acceptance in society. However, quantifying this behavioral change through statistics remains a complex endeavor due to its sensitive nature and prevailing societal norms. This blog post aims to shed light on the trends, percentages, and implications surrounding open marriages, leveraging on some of the latest research and studies conducted on this topic. Through understanding the statistics on open marriages, we can capture the shifts in societal attitudes, the possible impact on divorce rates, and perhaps uncover the changing dynamics of modern relationships.

The Latest Open Marriage Statistics Unveiled

As of 2020, approximately 4 to 5 percent of Americans are involved in a consensual open relationship, which includes open marriages.

Diving into the nuanced world of open marriages, this eye-opening statistic—approximately 4 to 5 percent of Americans are involved in a consensual open relationship as of 2020—serves as a critical compass. It doesn’t just quantify but unfolds a significant shift in societal norms and perceptions regarding monogamy and marriage in the modern world. It provides a numerical foundation for understanding this emerging trend, emphasizing its growing acceptance and practice. This figure further underscores the need for comprehensive discussions and informed considerations about the reality of open marriages and relationships in the contemporary socio-cultural landscape.

A survey from YouGov in 2020 indicated that 20% of men and 16% of women in open relationships reported feeling happier than those in monogamous unions.

In the realm of open marriage statistics, this intriguing discovery from a YouGov 2020 survey serves as a relevant cornerstone. This data—declaring that 20% of men and 16% of women in open relationships reported greater contentment than their monogamous counterparts—presents a profound insight into the emotional dynamics of these unconventional unions. Assessing this statistic deepens our understanding, pushing us to reevaluate commonly held perceptions about monogamy’s superiority in promoting happiness. Ergo, it serves as a compelling piece in the broader jigsaw puzzle of elucidating the complexities and potential merits of open marriages.

According to a 2016 study, only 1 in 5 people in open relationships reported feeling insecure or jealous, compared to nearly half of those in monogamous ones.

This tantalizing tidbit plucked from a 2016 research, revealing only 1 in 5 individuals grappling with feelings of insecurity or jealousy in open relationships when juxtaposed with its monogamous counterparts—where such sentiments crept up in almost half of the participants—paints a nuanced portrait of the open marriage landscape. The statistic significantly challenges the prevailing notion that open relationships inherently breed insecurity and jealousy, shining a new light on such arrangements in the context of our blog post on Open Marriage Statistics. Therefore, this statistic offers critical insight, signaling that those navigating open marriages may experience lower levels of emotional turmoil than those in monogamous relationships, thus reshaping our understanding of the emotional dynamics at play in such non-traditional unions.

Nearly 10 percent of marriages in the United States are non-monogamous according to data from 2019.

In our relentless quest to dismantle pre-conceived notions and to paint a more comprehensive picture of the modern marital landscape, this fascinating nugget of information unearths a telling trend. The revelation that nearly one in ten marriages in the United States, as per the 2019 data, shakes off the traditional shackles of monogamy is not just a simple statistic. It is an eye-opening testament to the evolving perceptions about commitment, fidelity, and freedom within marriage. This statistic outlines the gradual yet undeniable shift towards open marriages, underscoring the need for a deeper, layered understanding of these complex dynamics in an increasingly open-minded society.

According to the same 2016 study, those in open marriages are no less satisfied compared to those in monogamous relationships.

Painting a broader picture of the state of open marriages, this 2016 study’s statistic weaves a crucial narrative into our blog post on Open Marriage Statistics. Its implications reverberate strongly, challenging the conventional wisdom that exclusively monogamous relationships are the only avenue to contentment. By demonstrating that satisfaction levels in open marriages stand shoulder to shoulder with those in monogamous relationships, this data chips away at long-held preconceptions and invites a more complex and nuanced discussion around the topic of open marriages. It thereby enriches our understanding and opens space for a healthy discourse on different modes of matrimony, including open marriages.

An Avvo study from 2015 reported that 4% of American admitted to being in an open relationship.

In the canvas of open marriage statistics, the Avvo study from 2015 provides a vibrant splash of color, revealing that 4% of Americans confessed to being in an open relationship. These figures send a strong signal, unmasking a tangible bracket of society that subscribes to non-monogamous practices, contributing to a broader understanding of a naturally diverse, complex, and changing landscape of romantic customs. With this precious stat in hand, it allows readers to draw a more detailed picture of culture and acceptability, sparking a meaningful conversation about the evolution of modern relationships, and how societal norms are shifting.

In a YouGov survey, only 14% of millennials said they would consider an open relationship.

In the vast ocean of open marriage studies, the aforementioned YouGov survey sheds a beam of insight into the fascinating attitudes of millennials towards non-monogamous relationships. The statistic, revealing a meager 14% who would consider such an arrangement, provides a stark contrast to popularly held beliefs on the liberalness of this generation and brings into focus the importance of traditional monogamous unions to millennials. Integrating this surprising piece of data therefore adds an unexpected twist to the narrative of open marriage statistics, enriching the blog post with layered, thought-provoking content that could stimulate further discussion and introspection among readers.

In a survey of 1,000 adults, Avvo found that only 3% of married people reported having an open marriage.

Integrating the finding from Avvo’s survey into the discourse of open marriage statistics offers an insightful glimpse at the prevalence of open marriages within the adult population. Out of 1,000 adults surveyed, a mere 3% reported being in open marriages, thereby nailing a clear picture on the relative uncommonness of this marital arrangement. This compelling figure underscores the significance of societal norms and cultural expectations in influencing marital choices, while also hinting at potential barriers to broader acceptance or practice of open marriages. Furthermore, the low percentage begs for a deeper investigation of factors contributing to this statistic – shedding light on perceptions, misinformation, or challenges surrounding open marriages.

In 2021, a study suggested that about 17% of people under 45 had engaged in sexual activity outside of their relationship with the consent of their partner.

Integrating this insightful piece of statistic allows us to harness a broader understanding regarding open marriages, largely shedding light on the dynamics prevalent amongst younger generations. On the brink of 2021, roughly 17% of individuals below 45 reported taking part in consensual sexual encounters outside their relationships, encapsulating a facet of relational freedom often associated with open marriages. This figure serves as a cornerstone, offering a valuable insight into the complexity and flexibility of today’s partnerships, enabling nuanced conversation around the concepts of monogamy, non-monogamy and evolving relationship norms in this age bracket. Its importance in the discussion of open marriage statistics lies in its ability to underscore shifts in societal perceptions and practices, tailoring the narrative thread surrounding modern romantic involvements.

A survey by Avvo found that open marriages were more common among African Americans (12%) than Caucasians (7%).

This intriguing datapoint from Avvo’s survey that highlights a 5% difference in open marriages between African Americans and Caucasians offers a unique insight into the cultural dynamics of open marriages. Such demographic disparities paint a multidimensional portrait of the varied socio-cultural acceptance and prevalence of open marriages, which can drive informed discussions on the topic. By dissecting these patterns, a comprehensive understanding of open marriage trends, societal attitudes, and implications can be achieved, thereby enriching the depth of exploration in a blog post about Open Marriage Statistics.

A study in the Archives of Sexual Behavior found that consensual non-monogamy, including open marriage, increased by 44% between 1975 and 2014.

The leap of 44% more people embracing consensual non-monogamy, as revealed by the Archives of Sexual Behavior, paints a vivid picture of the shifting cultural norms touching upon marital experiences from 1975 to 2014. With such a significant increase, this statistic underscores a profound change in societal attitudes toward the traditionally held concept of monogamy and monopolizes the narrative on evolving intimate relationships. Therefore, it’s an indispensable tool in any discourse about open marriage statistics, offering an insightful foundation from which to explore this topic further. It serves as a potent testament to the redefining of marriage boundaries and illuminates the scope and pace at which acceptance for diverse relationship constructs are gaining ground.

In a 1983 study, it was found that people in open marriages had a 92% rate of partnership continuation compared to a 75% rate in traditional marriages.

Sparkling a surprising revelation in the realm of open marriage statistics, a study conducted in 1983 illuminates an intriguing facet of non-monogamous partnerships. With a striking 92% rate of partnership continuation, open marriages seemingly outpace their traditional counterparts – which stand at a 75% rate – in terms of longevity and perhaps, stability. This potent piece of information magnificently underscores the potential for open marriages to endure, challenging commonplace perceptions and stimulating robust dialogue on the effectiveness of non-traditional marital structures in our blog post discussion on open marriage statistics.

According to a Kinsey Institute report, as much as 40% of the population, engages in some form of open marriage or non-monogamy.

Probing the intricacies of societal norms and breaking down the conventional constructs of monogamous practices, the Kinsey Institute’s striking observation unveils a new dimension in understanding relationships today. It presents a hefty portion—40 percent—of society engaging in open marriages or non-monogamous relationships. This candid exposure offers a crucial pivot in the discourse of our blog post on Open Marriage Statistics, leading us to grapple with evolving relationship dynamics and challenging entrenched marital ideologies, thus ensuring a robust and comprehensive exploration of the topic.

In a study by Schechinger, Sakaluk, & Moors, it was found that bisexual women are most likely to be in open relationships.

Illuminating surprising facets of societal tendencies, the study by Schechinger, Sakaluk, & Moors provides unique insights into the dynamics of open marriages. The finding that bisexual women are more likely to be in open relationships resonates with imperative understanding, inserting a dimension of sexual orientation in the discourse of open marriage. This insight may perhaps encourage diverse narratives and discussions surrounding the topic, making the blog post about Open Marriage Statistics richer, more inclusive, and directly engaging with the matters ordinarily kept at the periphery.

According to a 2012 Netmums survey, one in four women would consider an open relationship.

Examining the intriguing statistic from a 2012 Netmums survey, it’s notable that a quarter of women would contemplate an open relationship. This noteworthy piece of data enriches the dialogue surrounding open marriages, adding a layer of quantified perspective into the ongoing societal discourse. The fact that a substantial percentage of women are open to non-monogamous relationships broadens our understanding of modern marital dynamics, adds gravity and credibility to the topic being discussed in our blog post about Open Marriage Statistics, and sparks further exploration of changing attitudes towards traditional marriage concepts, women’s liberation, and relationship paradigms.

An international online survey from 2020 found that about 61% of Italians would reject an open relationship under any circumstances.

The revelation that approximately 61% of Italians would shun an open relationship under any circumstances as according to a 2020 international online survey, serves as an intriguing spotlight into the prevailing attitudes towards open marriages in different cultures. In the blog post about Open Marriage Statistics, this figure provides a critical contrast, highlighting the cultural variances and challenges to the acceptability of open marriages, and consequently shaping the global narrative on the concept. Indeed, it underscores the parameters of the socio-cultural conversation around this progressive form of marital arrangement in forging further understanding of its global acceptance and dynamics.

Conclusion

Open marriages, though not conventional, are gradually gaining more visibility in modern society. However, the data reflects diverse experiences regarding their success and longevity, reiterating the complexity and uniqueness inherent in personal relationships. While certain statistics indicate substantial satisfaction levels and functioning communication structures within open marriages, others report significant challenges or ultimate relationship failure. It is crucial to remember that individuals’ subjective experiences may not align with the overall trend. Further research over a longer duration is needed to generate a more thorough understanding of open marriage dynamics and outcomes.

References

0. – https://www.www.statista.com

1. – https://www.psycnet.apa.org

2. – https://www.kinseyinstitute.org

3. – https://www.www.cosmopolitan.com

4. – https://www.www.dailymail.co.uk

5. – https://www.www.researchgate.net

6. – https://www.www.youbeauty.com

7. – https://www.thelinkup.com

8. – https://www.atlantablackstar.com

9. – https://www.www.prnewswire.com

10. – https://www.www.verywellmind.com

11. – https://www.link.springer.com

12. – https://www.www.scientificamerican.com

13. – https://www.today.yougov.com

FAQs

What is an open marriage?

An open marriage is a form of non-monogamy where the partners fundamentally agree that each may engage in extramarital sexual relationships, without this being considered as infidelity.

What proportion of marriages are open marriages?

While this can vary significantly due to society's evolving views on monogamy, studies suggest about 4-5% of married couples in the US are in open marriages. However, this is an estimate and the true number may be higher due to under-reporting or variation in definitions.

Are open marriages less stable than monogamous marriages?

There is no definitive answer to this as the stability of a marriage can be affected by numerous factors. Some studies suggest that open marriages can add complexity and challenges, which may affect stability. However, if all parties involved are open, communicative, and consent to the arrangement, it may work well for them.

How does jealousy factor into open marriages?

In an open marriage, boundaries are set and conversations about jealousy are had upfront. The partners agree on how they will handle desires or emotions that may emerge once other partners are introduced. Successful open marriages often have strong communication and transparency.

Are children from open marriages affected by their parents' lifestyle?

This largely depends on how the parents handle the situation. Like any other family structure, clear communication, love, and stability are integral to a child's wellbeing. The impact on the children would depend on the individual case rather than the practice of open marriage alone.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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