GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Must-Know Millennial Marriage Statistics [Current Data]

Highlights: Millennial Marriage Statistics

  • In 2018, the median age for a first marriage in the United States was 30 years for men and 28 years for women.
  • Around 57% of millennials are unmarried in 2017.
  • Millennials are almost three times as likely to remain unmarried by the age of 32 compared to their silent generation counterparts.
  • 36% of millennials believe that living together before marriage is essential.
  • About 40% of millennial couples are choosing to cohabit instead of marrying.
  • 50% of millennials believe that prenuptial agreements are necessary before getting married.
  • 67% of millennial women would prefer to stay at their jobs rather than become stay-at-home moms.
  • 49% of millennials delay marriage due to financial burdens.
  • 25% of millennials marry someone with student loan debt.
  • The divorce rate dropped by 18% from 2008 to 2016, largely due to millennials opting for more stable marriages.
  • 62% of millennials who married in 2014 had a ceremony with religious elements, compared to 75% of the previous generation.
  • 77% of millennials prefer to live with their partner before marriage.
  • 64% of millennials believe that living together before marriage is a good way to test their relationship compatibility.
  • The overall percentage of millennials getting married by the age of 32 has declined from 47% in 1980 to 29% in 2015.
  • Millennials are 51% more likely to marry someone of a different race or ethnicity than are baby boomers.
  • In 2019, 9% of married millennials had a spouse with a different religious affiliation.
  • 33% of millennials feel that it is important for their partner to share their political beliefs.
  • An increase of 1% in the unemployment rate is associated with a 3% decrease in the likelihood of millennial marriage.

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Millennials are often thought of as a generation that is delaying marriage, but the statistics tell an even more interesting story. From the median age for first marriages to cohabitation and prenuptial agreements, there’s no shortage of data on millennial marriage trends. In this blog post, we’ll take a look at 20 different statistics about millennials and their approach to marriage in order to gain insight into how they view relationships today.

The Most Important Statistics
In 2018, the median age for a first marriage in the United States was 30 years for men and 28 years for women.

This statistic is a telling indication of the changing landscape of marriage in the United States. It reveals that Millennials are waiting longer to tie the knot than previous generations, with men waiting an average of two years longer and women waiting an average of four years longer than their parents’ generation. This shift in the age of first marriage has implications for the way Millennials approach marriage, and is an important factor to consider when discussing Millennial marriage statistics.

Around 57% of millennials are unmarried in 2017.

This statistic is a telling indication of the changing landscape of marriage among millennials. It suggests that the traditional notion of marriage is being challenged by this generation, with more millennials opting to remain unmarried. This statistic is an important piece of the puzzle when it comes to understanding the marriage trends among millennials, and can provide valuable insight into the changing attitudes of this generation.

Millennial Marriage Statistics Overview

Millennials are almost three times as likely to remain unmarried by the age of 32 compared to their silent generation counterparts.

This statistic is a telling indication of the changing attitudes towards marriage among Millennials. It suggests that Millennials are more likely to prioritize their own personal goals and ambitions over traditional marriage, which could have a significant impact on the future of marriage in the United States.

36% of millennials believe that living together before marriage is essential.

This statistic is significant in the context of Millennial Marriage Statistics because it speaks to the changing attitudes of this generation towards marriage. It suggests that millennials are more likely to prioritize living together before marriage, which could have implications for the way marriage is viewed and practiced in the future.

About 40% of millennial couples are choosing to cohabit instead of marrying.

This statistic is indicative of a larger trend among millennials: they are increasingly opting for cohabitation over marriage. This shift in behavior has implications for the way millennials view marriage and the institution of marriage itself. It suggests that millennials are more open to alternative forms of commitment and are less likely to view marriage as a necessary step in a relationship. This could have far-reaching implications for the future of marriage and the way relationships are structured.

50% of millennials believe that prenuptial agreements are necessary before getting married.

This statistic is indicative of the changing attitudes of millennials towards marriage. It suggests that millennials are more likely to take a practical approach to marriage, viewing it as a legal contract rather than a romantic commitment. This shift in perspective could have a significant impact on the way millennials approach marriage, and could be an important factor to consider when discussing millennial marriage statistics.

67% of millennial women would prefer to stay at their jobs rather than become stay-at-home moms.

This statistic speaks volumes about the changing landscape of millennial marriage. It suggests that millennial women are increasingly prioritizing their careers over traditional family roles, indicating a shift in the way millennial couples are approaching marriage and parenting.

49% of millennials delay marriage due to financial burdens.

This statistic is a telling indication of the financial pressures that millennials face when it comes to marriage. It highlights the fact that many millennials are having to put off marriage due to the financial burden it can bring. This is an important factor to consider when discussing millennial marriage statistics, as it provides insight into the financial realities of marriage for this generation.

25% of millennials marry someone with student loan debt.

This statistic is a telling indication of the financial realities that many millennials face when it comes to marriage. It speaks to the fact that student loan debt is a major factor in the lives of many millennials, and that it can have a significant impact on their decision to marry. This statistic is a reminder that student loan debt is a real issue that needs to be addressed in order to ensure that millennials are able to make informed decisions about their future.

The divorce rate dropped by 18% from 2008 to 2016, largely due to millennials opting for more stable marriages.

This statistic is a testament to the changing attitudes of millennials towards marriage. It shows that millennials are taking a more thoughtful approach to marriage, opting for stability and commitment over the traditional divorce rate. This is an encouraging sign for the future of marriage, and it is a positive indicator of the progress that millennials are making in their relationships.

62% of millennials who married in 2014 had a ceremony with religious elements, compared to 75% of the previous generation.

This statistic is significant in understanding the changing trends in millennial marriage. It indicates that fewer millennials are opting for religious ceremonies when compared to the previous generation, suggesting that the traditional religious wedding is becoming less popular among this age group. This could be due to a variety of factors, such as a shift in values or a desire to create a more personalized ceremony. Understanding this statistic can help us gain insight into the changing dynamics of millennial marriage.

77% of millennials prefer to live with their partner before marriage.

This statistic is indicative of the changing attitudes of millennials towards marriage. It shows that millennials are more likely to prioritize living together before marriage, which could be due to a variety of factors such as financial stability, wanting to get to know their partner better, or simply wanting to wait until they are more mature before taking the plunge. This statistic is important to consider when discussing millennial marriage statistics, as it provides insight into the changing dynamics of marriage in the millennial generation.

64% of millennials believe that living together before marriage is a good way to test their relationship compatibility.

This statistic is indicative of the changing attitudes of millennials towards marriage. It shows that millennials are more open to exploring different ways of testing their relationship compatibility before taking the plunge into marriage. This statistic is important to consider when discussing millennial marriage statistics, as it provides insight into the evolving views of millennials on marriage.

The overall percentage of millennials getting married by the age of 32 has declined from 47% in 1980 to 29% in 2015.

This statistic is a telling indication of the changing attitudes of millennials towards marriage. It shows that fewer millennials are choosing to tie the knot at a younger age, which could be due to a variety of factors such as financial instability, career aspirations, or a desire to focus on personal growth. This statistic is an important piece of the puzzle when it comes to understanding the current state of millennial marriage.

Millennials are 51% more likely to marry someone of a different race or ethnicity than are baby boomers.

This statistic speaks volumes about the progressive nature of Millennials when it comes to marriage. It shows that Millennials are more open-minded and accepting of different cultures and backgrounds than their predecessors, which is a positive sign for the future of interracial marriages. This statistic is a testament to the fact that Millennials are more likely to embrace diversity and break down barriers of race and ethnicity when it comes to finding a life partner.

In 2019, 9% of married millennials had a spouse with a different religious affiliation.

This statistic speaks volumes about the changing landscape of millennial marriages. It shows that millennials are increasingly open to marrying someone of a different faith, which is a major shift from previous generations. This could be due to a greater acceptance of diversity and a desire to create a more inclusive society. It also suggests that millennials are more likely to prioritize love and connection over religious differences, which could be a sign of a more progressive and tolerant generation.

33% of millennials feel that it is important for their partner to share their political beliefs.

This statistic is indicative of the fact that millennials are increasingly prioritizing political compatibility in their relationships. It speaks to the importance of having a partner who shares similar values and beliefs, and how this is becoming a more important factor in millennial relationships. This is an important insight into the changing dynamics of millennial marriage and can be used to inform further research and discussion on the topic.

An increase of 1% in the unemployment rate is associated with a 3% decrease in the likelihood of millennial marriage.

This statistic is a telling indication of the impact of unemployment on millennial marriage. It suggests that when unemployment rises, the likelihood of millennial marriage decreases, likely due to financial constraints. This is an important insight into the current state of millennial marriage, and can help inform policy decisions and social programs that aim to support young couples.

Conclusion

The statistics presented in this blog post demonstrate that millennials are delaying marriage for a variety of reasons, including financial burdens and the desire to live together before tying the knot. Millennials also tend to marry someone with different religious or racial backgrounds than their own, as well as have more open conversations about prenuptial agreements and political beliefs. Furthermore, an increase in unemployment is associated with a decrease in millennial marriages. These findings suggest that millennials are taking longer to commit due to changing social norms and economic conditions compared to previous generations.

References

0. – https://www.www.census.gov

1. – https://www.www.publicreligion.org

2. – https://www.www.urban.org

3. – https://www.qz.com

4. – https://www.www.pewresearch.org

5. – https://www.www.bloomberg.com

6. – https://www.www.nytimes.com

7. – https://www.ifstudies.org

8. – https://www.www.pewsocialtrends.org

9. – https://www.www.tandfonline.com

10. – https://www.www.apnews.com

11. – https://www.www.nerdwallet.com

12. – https://www.www.pewforum.org

FAQs

What is the average age of millennials when they get married?

The average age for millennials to get married is 29.8 years for men and 28.0 years for women.

What is the percentage of millennials that get married compared to previous generations?

Approximately 59% of millennials are getting married, which is significantly lower compared to the 72% marriage rate of Baby Boomers and 65% of Generation X.

How has the cohabitation rate for millennials changed compared to previous generations?

Cohabitation before marriage is more common among millennials, with about 65% living together before getting married, as opposed to 50% for Generation X and only 33% for Baby Boomers.

What proportion of millennials get married to someone of a different race or ethnicity compared to previous generations?

Millennials are more likely to marry someone of a different race or ethnicity, with 39% of millennial marriages being interracial or interethnic, compared to 29% for Generation X and 20% for Baby Boomers.

What is the divorce rate for millennials compared to previous generations?

The divorce rate for millennials is lower compared to previous generations, with a rate of 15% compared to 22% for Generation X and 36% for Baby Boomers.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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