GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Getting Married Young Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Getting Married Young Statistics

  • The average age of marriage in the United States for women was 27.4 and for men was 29.5 as of 2019, whereas it was 23 for women and 26 for men in 1990.
  • According to a study, marrying young can lead to a 60% higher risk of divorce compared to those who marry after the age of 25.
  • 48% of women who marry before 18 are likely to divorce within 10 years, compared to 24% who marry after 25, according to a study.
  • Those who marry young, especially women, are less likely to earn a college degree. Only 9% of women who married before age 19 had a bachelor's degree by age 25, compared to 31% of women who married later.
  • Based on the 2000 census, 4.1% of 15 to 19-year-old women were married in the US.
  • About 6% of young adults in the US, aged between 18 to 24, are married.
  • As per a report by UNICEF, globally, around 21% of young women were married before they turned 18.
  • An annual income of over $50,000 is less likely for couples who marry young, with only 29% hitting this milestone, compared to 49% who marry after the age of 26.
  • A report found that 70% of individuals who marry in their teens will be divorced within 15 years.
  • As per the CDC's National Survey of Family Growth, 62% of couples who marry before the age of 18 end up separated or divorced.
  • According to a study, individuals who marry under 18 are more likely to live in poverty, with 31% of women falling below the poverty line.
  • As per U.S. Census data, more than half of the wives who married before 18 had separated or divorced within 15 years.
  • As per a survey by Pew Research Center, the percentage of people between the ages of 18 and 24 who are currently married is 9%.
  • As per the US Census Bureau, in 2015, there were about 230,000 child marriages (under 18 years of age) in the US.
  • Teen brides are nearly three times more likely to have at least five children.
  • 69% of teen marriages end in divorce within the first 15 years.
  • Women marrying under the age of 20 have a 27% chance of remaining in poverty.
  • The risk of maternal mortality is higher among women who marry before age 18.

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Marriage is a significant milestone in many people’s lives. While some opt to tie the knot later in life, there is a considerable population that says their vows at a younger age. Diving into the intriguing realm of ‘Getting Married Young Statistics’, we will unravel patterns, trends, and correlations that come with early unions. Whether you’re contemplating a youthful marriage, conducting academic research, or simply curious about societal trends, our deep dive into the data-driven aspect of early marriage will provide eye-opening insights.

The Latest Getting Married Young Statistics Unveiled

The average age of marriage in the United States for women was 27.4 and for men was 29.5 as of 2019, whereas it was 23 for women and 26 for men in 1990.

In crafting a thought-provoking blog post about Getting Married Young Statistics, these numbers strike an enlightening chord. Observing the marriage-age shift over the years, from 1990 to 2019, illustrates a prominent societal shift—delayed matrimony. Unveiling that women in 1990, on average, were walking down the aisle at 23 compared to 27.4 in recent years, and likewise for men, 26 to 29.5, indicates profound discipline in a changing landscape. These figures hint at the landscape of prioritizing objective aspects such as career, education, and self-growth, with matrimony making its entrance at a later stage of life, a shift that can enrich conversation and broaden perspectives on what it means to marry young in today’s context.

According to a study, marrying young can lead to a 60% higher risk of divorce compared to those who marry after the age of 25.

Diving into the depths of romantic commitments at a young age might seem like an exciting voyage, however, the quoted statistic above tinges this journey with a shade of caution. The statistic, indicating a 60% higher risk of divorce for those marrying young as compared to those who tie the knot after 25, reverberates with substantial implications in the broader context of a blog post about ‘Getting Married Young Statistics’. It serves as a pivotal signpost, an analytical compass that directs readers towards a more nuanced understanding about early marriages, urging them to contemplate upon the inherent challenges, resulting complications, and potential instability associated with them. Hence, irrespective of the romantic allure of young love, it underscores the importance of maturity, growth and patience in marital decisions, for a healthy and lasting relationship.

48% of women who marry before 18 are likely to divorce within 10 years, compared to 24% who marry after 25, according to a study.

Pouring over the compelling marriage age data offers a striking insight into the stability of youthful marriages. The statistic showing that 48% of women marrying before 18 are likely to divorce within 10 years, nearly doubling the 24% rate for those who commit after 25, paints a telling portrait. In the realm of young marriage discussions, this data serves as a profound commentary on the pitfalls of early matrimonial union, thus driving home the core argument of early age matrimony in the blog post about Getting Married Young Statistics.

Those who marry young, especially women, are less likely to earn a college degree. Only 9% of women who married before age 19 had a bachelor’s degree by age 25, compared to 31% of women who married later.

In the discourse on young marriages, the aforementioned statistic paints a compelling picture of educational attainment, particularly for women. Marrying early, specifically before 19, markedly decreases the likelihood of earning a college degree — only 9% achieve a bachelor’s degree by the age of 25 versus 31% who marry later. This data not only underscores the relationship between age at marriage and level of education achieved, but also invites conversation about the potential social, financial, and personal implications these young brides may face in the future. While each individual’s journey is different, this statistic offers insightful context for those contemplating early marriage and considering the possible long-term impacts on education and career.

Based on the 2000 census, 4.1% of 15 to 19-year-old women were married in the US.

In the vast landscape of young marriage statistics, the 2000 census reveals an intriguing insight: 4.1% of US women aged 15 to 19 were married. Encapsulating youthful love’s zeitgeist at the turn of the millennium, this figure is a testament to the proportion of teenage girls embracing marital commitments early in life. In dissecting the demographics of young marriages, it offers readers a broader understanding of trends across time, while also spurring discussions on the societal, cultural, and personal factors influencing these early marriages. Thus, it’s an important stepping stone in comprehending the overall narrative of getting married young in America.

About 6% of young adults in the US, aged between 18 to 24, are married.

Highlighting that a meager 6% of young adults in the US, aged between 18 to 24, are married paints a vivid picture of the current marital landscape among American youth. It’s an eye-opening snapshot signifying a continuing trend of younger generations tying the knot later in life compared to their predecessors, and key to understanding shifts in societal norms and values related to marriage. This figure serves as a potent indicator for researchers, policy makers, and curious readers who are interested in exploring factors influencing this trend such as education, economic stability, and changing societal expectations.

As per a report by UNICEF, globally, around 21% of young women were married before they turned 18.

Delving into the realm of youthful matrimony, the blog post about “Getting Married Young Statistics” would remain incomplete sans the discussion of the solemn datum by UNICEF, affirming that nearly 21% of young women globally tied the nuptial knot before reaching the age of 18. This data point not only conveys the prevalence of underage marriage but also prompts reflections on the socio-cultural norms, economic conditions as well as the legal frameworks that allow such unions. Moreover, it echoes the potential long-term implications on these young brides’ health, education, and overall development, making it an imperative constituent of the discourse around young marriages.

An annual income of over $50,000 is less likely for couples who marry young, with only 29% hitting this milestone, compared to 49% who marry after the age of 26.

Illuminating the fiscal dimensions of matrimony, the statistical data reveals a fascinating correlation between age at marriage and subsequent financial success. The mere 29% of young couples who command an annual income of over $50,000 starkly contrasts the almost half (49%) of those marrying post-26 reaching the same financial milestone. Evidently, this contemporary insight into the economic dynamics of early marriage not only underscores the financial challenges potentially faced by youthful duos but also invites a deeper understanding of the socio-economic factors influencing their income trajectory. This particular statistic provides an important perspective for any young couple contemplating tying the knot in the context of their long-term financial goals.

A report found that 70% of individuals who marry in their teens will be divorced within 15 years.

In the realm of exploring the complexities bound up with young marriages, it’s virtually impossible to sideline a striking observation- a shocking 70% of teens who take the marital plunge are predicted to face the unpleasant finale of divorce within 15 years. This pivotal data point, unearthed by a comprehensive report, paints a grim reality of early wedlock and pours light on its impressive contribution to the escalating divorce rate. Therefore, it significantly navigates a blog post about ‘Getting Married Young Statistics’, offering readers a vivid perspective to tread through the potential downsides of entering marital life at such tender age, hence potentially steering them towards more thoughtful decision-making.

As per the CDC’s National Survey of Family Growth, 62% of couples who marry before the age of 18 end up separated or divorced.

The beacon stat revealing that 62% of couples, who tie the knot before 18, eventually part ways as mirrored in the CDC’s National Survey of Family Growth, forms a pivotal juncture in our discourse on marital statistics pertinent to young love. Its relevance is particularly compelling, unmasking the vulnerability of marriages conceived in the cradle of adolescence, and hence, infusing the discussion with dynamic context and meaningful depth. This numeric revelation, not only breathes life into the abstract concepts of marital longevity and compatibility, but makes you rethink the wisdom and implications of pledging eternal love at such tender years.

According to a study, individuals who marry under 18 are more likely to live in poverty, with 31% of women falling below the poverty line.

The discovery from a study, highlighting the higher poverty risk among women marrying below the age of 18, anchors startling realities within a blog post about Getting Married Young Statistics. This key percentage of 31% exposes a significant socio-economic fallout from early wedding bells, driving home the imperative of understanding such statistics before making life-changing decisions. By shedding light on the economic challenges these women face, the statistic adds a critical dimension to discussions on the implications of youthful marriages, adding depth and nuance to the narrative and prompting further discourse on the intersection of age, marriage, and economic stability.

As per U.S. Census data, more than half of the wives who married before 18 had separated or divorced within 15 years.

Exploring the captivating world of statistics on young marriages, the metric derived from U.S. Census data that over half of wives wedded before the age of 18 found themselves divorced or separated within 15 years presents a starkly impactful insight. Highlighting potential ramifications of early nuptial decisions, it provides an invaluable perspective in understanding the long-term stability of such unions. This statistic subtly underscores the significance of maturity and preparedness, beyond mere emotional readiness, in the enduring institution of marriage, an indispensable viewpoint for any reader navigating through the diverse landscape of getting married young statistics.

As per a survey by Pew Research Center, the percentage of people between the ages of 18 and 24 who are currently married is 9%.

The striking revelation of a mere 9% of individuals between ages 18 and 24 being married, as per the Pew Research Center, forms a significant cornerstone for our exploration into the topic of young marriages. It indicates a prevailing tendency towards delayed marriages, setting the stage for us to delve further into the underlying reasons, implications, and trends shaping the landscape of young marriages. This singular figure helps to justify the need for comprehensive discussion and understanding of young marriage statistics. It further underscores the value of this blog in providing an analytical perspective to enhance readers’ comprehension of the socio-cultural dynamics steering young individuals away from the marital institution within this age bracket.

As per the US Census Bureau, in 2015, there were about 230,000 child marriages (under 18 years of age) in the US.

Drawing attention to the reported 230,000 child marriages in the US in 2015, as per the US Census Bureau, brings into focus a crucial but often overlooked dimension of the discussion on early marriages. In a dialogue largely dominated by narratives of youthful romance and premature responsibilities, this figure is a stark reminder of the systematic issues in play. The sheer number of these marriages exposes the extent of a societal phenomenon long hidden in the shadows, inviting further exploration into its underlying causes and potential impacts while adding depth and gravity to a blog post centered on getting married young statistics.

Teen brides are nearly three times more likely to have at least five children.

Unveiling the correlation between early marriage and larger families, the captivating statistic reveals that teen brides are nearly three times more likely to have at least five children. Such a statistic provides significant insights in a blog post about ‘Getting Married Young Statistics’, enriching readers’ understanding of the multifaceted implications of youthful nuptials. It frames the discussion on the societal, economic, and health impacts of early marriage and large families, laying the foundation for in-depth exploration and discussions. This figure serves not only as an eye-opener but also as a conversation starter, enabling readers to delve into the depth and magnitude of decisions such as tying the knot at a young age.

69% of teen marriages end in divorce within the first 15 years.

Highlighting the statistic that “69% of teen marriages end in divorce within the first 15 years” brings a pivotal new perspective to the conversation around early nuptials. This illuminates a stark reality about the stability and survivability of such unions, suggesting that the emotional maturity, financial readiness, and other critical life skills needed for a successful marriage may still be underdeveloped for most adolescents. It provides a sobering caution for young people contemplating early marriage, hinting at the complexities, challenges, and the seeming fragility of these unions, which are often concealed by the romantic allure of young love. This data is not to discourage but to underscore the importance of informed decision-making when it comes to a life-altering commitment such as marriage.

Women marrying under the age of 20 have a 27% chance of remaining in poverty.

Highlighting the statistic – ‘Women marrying under the age of 20 have a 27% chance of remaining in poverty’ – presents an essential cornerstone in blogging about young marriages. The demographic trends, associated risk factors, and socioeconomic consequences for these young brides are encapsulated in this percentage. This complements the blog’s central discourse, helping readers grasp the harsh reality of premature nuptials and its potential to engender perpetual financial struggles. It is a wake-up call to young females, accentuating the importance of delaying marriage to invest in their education and career development, which could considerably drop their chance of being trapped in the vicious cycle of poverty. Hence, the severity of this statistical information enriches the blog’s content by amplifying the economical pitfalls linked with early matrimony.

The risk of maternal mortality is higher among women who marry before age 18.

Uncovering the tangled relationship between youthful matrimony and maternal mortality, we find an unsettling truth: Women marrying before 18 face a significantly higher risk of maternal mortality. Within a discussion on getting married young statistics, this alarming figure isn’t just a number, but a poignant echo of countless untold stories. It serves as a red flag, urging us to delve deeper into the issues faced by young brides globally; shedding light on the urgent need for education, informed consent, equal opportunity, and effective health resources. Grasping the implications of this statistic equips readers with critical perspective on the far-reaching ramifications of early marriage, catalyzing broader discussions on children’s rights, health policies, and societal norms.

Conclusion

Getting married at a young age can have a variety of outcomes, with data showing both benefits and challenges. Young married couples may enjoy increased chances of economic stability and long-term marriage success, yet statistics also suggest they face an increased likelihood of divorce compared to those who marry older. Therefore, age isn’t the sole determinant of marital success, but a factor amongst many others such as education, career stability, mutual understanding, and emotional maturity. As much as statistics provide insight into trends, each couple’s journey is unique, making age just one factor to consider when thinking about tying the knot.

References

0. – https://www.www.businessinsider.in

1. – https://www.www.childtrends.org

2. – https://www.link.springer.com

3. – https://www.www.worldbank.org

4. – https://www.www.pewresearch.org

5. – https://www.www.businessinsider.com

6. – https://www.www.unomaha.edu

7. – https://www.fas.org

8. – https://www.www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

9. – https://www.www.cdc.gov

10. – https://www.www.researchgate.net

11. – https://www.www.census.gov

12. – https://www.www.statista.com

13. – https://www.www.guttmacher.org

14. – https://www.www.unicef.org

FAQs

What is the average age people get married?

Globally, the average age for marriage varies considerable. According to UN data, the worldwide average age for women to get married is around 25, while men tend to marry at around 28 years.

What percentage of young marriages end in divorce?

Divorce rates vary widely by country, socioeconomic status and other factors. However, according to a U.S study from Bureau of Labor Statistics, around 60% of marriages for couples between the ages of 20 and 25 end in divorce.

Are there any statistical benefits of getting married at a young age?

Certain studies suggest that those who marry young may be likely to experience higher levels of happiness and mental well-being, and lower levels of depression. However, statistics also indicate higher divorce rates, financial difficulties and other challenges.

What are the commonly perceived risks of getting married young?

Statistics suggest higher rates of divorce, financial instability, limited educational attainment and potential for less career advancement. These perceived risks vary considerably depending on individual circumstances and societal factors.

What percentage of young people still tend to get married?

The percentage of young people getting married depends on the region. According to the U.S Census Bureau, approximately 8% of all people aged between 18-29 were married in 2016. Globally, the percentages can be higher or lower depending on cultural norms and socioeconomic factors.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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