GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Ecstasy Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Ecstasy Statistics

  • Around 1.7% of the global population aged 15-64 years have used ecstasy at some point in their lives.
  • Use of ecstasy among Australian teenagers aged 14-19 decreased from 6% in 2013 to 2.4% in 2016.
  • In the UK in 2016/17, ecstasy was used by 3.1% of adults aged 16 to 24 years.
  • In 2018, 2.9% of German adults aged 18-64 years reported having used ecstasy at least once in their life.
  • In 2019, people aged 18 to 25 years had the highest prevalence of ecstasy use in the USA (3.8% in the past year).
  • Between 2016 and 2019, emergency department visits related to ecstasy intake increased by 128% in France.
  • In Canada, 6.4% of students in grades 7 and 8 and 19.3% of students in grades 9 to 12 reported trying ecstasy at least once in 2019.
  • In 2020, around 4.3% of European adults (18-64 years) reported lifetime use of ecstasy.
  • 0.2 % of the Swedish population aged 15-64 reported use of ecstasy in 2020.
  • In the year 2019, 1.4% of U.S. high school students reported using ecstasy at least once.
  • In 2018, the Netherlands seized 19,000 kg of ecstasy, the largest quantity in Europe.
  • In Brazil, the use of ecstasy among high school students was 1.5% in 2016.
  • In 2019, in Europe, 5.4% of drug law offences were related to ecstasy.
  • In 2017, there were around 860,000 emergency department visits in the US related to the use of ecstasy.
  • In 2018, 5% of drivers caught by police in England and Wales tested positive for ecstasy (MDMA).
  • In 2019, 0.3% of the population of Ireland aged 15-34 years reported using ecstasy in the last month.
  • In the USA in 2019, males aged 18-25 (4.5%) were more likely than females in the same age group (3.0%) to have used ecstasy in the past year.
  • In 2019, 1.5% of young adults in Spain reported having used ecstasy at least once in their life (aged 15-34 years).
  • Between 2011 and 2015, 433 deaths in England and Wales involved ecstasy.

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As a phenomenon tightly entwined with the ever-evolving global party culture, ecstasy use and its corresponding implications are areas of increasing interest and concern. This blog post seeks to shed light on the topic by diving deep into the world of ecstasy statistics. We will explore various dimensions of ecstasy use, including its prevalence, the demographic trends, associated health impacts, and the legal concerns, all grounded in the most recent and reliable data available. Discover a unique, data-informed perspective on this widely used yet often misunderstood recreational drug.

The Latest Ecstasy Statistics Unveiled

Around 1.7% of the global population aged 15-64 years have used ecstasy at some point in their lives.

Delving into the realm of ecstasy usage, an intriguing point of discussion is a significant statistic – roughly 1.7% of the global population, aged 15-64, have experienced ecstasy at least once in their life. This statistic offers a sweeping view on the prevalence and reach of ecstasy, transcending the widespread stereotype of it being a ‘rave or club drug’. Examining this figure within a global scale and varied age demographic provides a comprehensive perspective, highlighting its pervasive nature and forming the basis for a detailed analysis of factors leading to its usage. This ultimately aids in developing an informed narrative about ecstasy, while constructing a data-driven foundation for policymakers and health experts in designing effective prevention or intervention strategies.

Use of ecstasy among Australian teenagers aged 14-19 decreased from 6% in 2013 to 2.4% in 2016.

Illuminating a promising downswing in the usage of ecstasy amid Australian teenagers spanning 14-19 years of age, the depicted change from 6% in 2013 to a promising 2.4% in 2016 underscores the essentiality of continuous substance abuse awareness and prevention education. This striking reduction reveals the ostensible efficacy of preventative strategies employed during that timeframe. In the context of a blog post about Ecstasy Statistics, this trend provides a beacon of triumph in an often grim landscape of substance abuse, indicating a potential formula for future success that may be applied globally in the fight against drug use among adolescents.

In the UK in 2016/17, ecstasy was used by 3.1% of adults aged 16 to 24 years.

Unveiling the core facet of our blog post, we delve into the heart of ecstasy usage, particularly its impact on the young adult demographic within the United Kingdom. The estimation that back in 2016/17, as many as 3.1% of adults aged 16 to 24 experimented with ecstasy provides genuine insight, giving a stark representation of the drug’s prevalence among youth during that period. It offers readers a snapshot of an alarming trend, highlighting the influential grip Ecstasy seemingly wielded over this age group, thus underscoring the need for continued discussion, further research, and proactive intervention strategies.

In 2018, 2.9% of German adults aged 18-64 years reported having used ecstasy at least once in their life.

Highlighting the statistic that 2.9% of German adults aged 18-64 years reported having used ecstasy at least once in their life in 2018 brings a human element to our blog post on Ecstasy Statistics. It helps to create a tangible link between spreadsheet numbers and real-life situations, which can offer our readers a snapshot of the drug’s usage in Germany during that year. This figure could act as an alarm-bell, underscoring the pervasiveness of ecstasy, and contribute to ongoing conversations about drug policies, education initiatives, and prevention tactics.

In 2019, people aged 18 to 25 years had the highest prevalence of ecstasy use in the USA (3.8% in the past year).

By zeroing in on ecstasy use amongst the age bracket of 18 to 25 in the US in 2019, with a notable prevalence of 3.8% within the past year, we shine a light on an important issue in contemporary society. Offering a critical view on this trend, the statistic not only highlights the apparent popularity of the substance amongst younger generations, but simultaneously underscores the potential implications in terms of public health, addiction risk, and societal concern. Interpreting this data, the blog post will seek to provide meaningful insight about ecstasy usage trends, targeting a broad audience from health organizations to academic research and general public, by providing understanding, stimulating conversation and propelling preventive measures.

Between 2016 and 2019, emergency department visits related to ecstasy intake increased by 128% in France.

Highlighting a shocking surge in ecstasy-linked emergency department visits by 128% in France from 2016 to 2019 underscores the escalating public health risk and the insidious influence of this dangerous party drug. In the illuminating world of Ecstasy statistics, this alarming trend is a stark reminder that we are facing a heated battle against misuse and abuse. This information suggests not only increasing popularity of the drug, but also an enhanced threat to people’s health and well-being, capturing the urgent need for increased public awareness efforts, stringent law enforcement action, and effective intervention strategies.

In Canada, 6.4% of students in grades 7 and 8 and 19.3% of students in grades 9 to 12 reported trying ecstasy at least once in 2019.

Unveiling an alarming trend about Ecstasy use among Canadian middle and high school students, this statistic injects gravity into our understanding of the issue. It underscores that the vulnerability to Ecstasy experimentation is not confined to high schoolers (with an unsettling 19.3% usage rate) but distressingly descends to grades 7 and 8 where 6.4% students acknowledged having sampled the drug. The revelation amplifies the urgency to fortify our preventive measures and intervention strategies, considering the young ages involved and the potential developmental and health consequences of Ecstasy use. To say that the statistic is significant is an understatement; it’s a wake-up call, demanding deeper insights, broader discussions, and more assertive actions against Ecstasy usage among our youth.

In 2020, around 4.3% of European adults (18-64 years) reported lifetime use of ecstasy.

Shedding light on the magnitude of ecstasy use in our society, the statistic unveils a captivating narrative – an estimated 4.3% of European adults, between 18 to 64 years, acknowledged a lifetime encounter with ecstasy during 2020. This slice of data, a seemingly minuscule percentage, actually represents millions, underscoring the pervasiveness of this particular recreational drug in European societies. For a post focused on Ecstasy Statistics, this statistic becomes a linchpin, grounding discussions, providing a perspective on the scale of use, and provoking thoughts about the effects, both individual and social, that such prevalence might engender.

0.2 % of the Swedish population aged 15-64 reported use of ecstasy in 2020.

The illustration that 0.2% of the Swedish population aged 15-64 reported using ecstasy in 2020 serves as a critical data point in the discourse of ecstasy statistics. It underscores the prevalence of the substance within a particularly impressionable age demographic in a developed Western nation like Sweden. Although percentage-wise it may appear small, when equated to the actual population, the number could be alarmingly substantial. Such insights help us understand the extent of the ecstasy problem, informing potential interventions, awareness campaigns, and policy-making, assisting health professionals, educators, policy makers and communities in tackling the problem more effectively.

In the year 2019, 1.4% of U.S. high school students reported using ecstasy at least once.

Drawing attention to the figure that suggests 1.4% of U.S. high school students reported using ecstasy at least once in 2019 can be of immense value when exploring Ecstasy Statistics. It bravely shines a light on the disconcerting reality of drug use among younger demographics, potentially indicating an alarming trend or pattern. This focal data point, presented within a blog post on Ecstasy statistics, underscores the need for persistent awareness, prevention efforts, and policies aimed at restricting substance abuse in this vulnerable age group. Furthermore, it keeps the dialogue alive concerning the multifaceted impacts of ecstasy usage on academic performance, mental health, and overall life quality.

In 2018, the Netherlands seized 19,000 kg of ecstasy, the largest quantity in Europe.

Highlighting the statistic that the Netherlands seized 19,000 kg of ecstasy in 2018, the largest amount in Europe, underscores the significant role this small European country plays in the global ecstasy trade. This anecdote is a powerful component of a broader narrative about Ecstasy Statistics as it provides insight into geographical patterns of production, distribution, usage, and law enforcement efforts related to this specific drug. With such context, our readers are able to better understand the scope and gravity of ecstasy market, and further validate the manifold implications that this figure brings — from health risks and policy-making to global security and economics.

In Brazil, the use of ecstasy among high school students was 1.5% in 2016.

Highlighting the example of Brazil, where ecstasy use among high school students hit 1.5% in 2016, offers an insightful perspective to gauge the extent of the issue at hand in a global context. The fact that an emerging market, known more for its socio-economic challenges than drug use, reports substantial youth involvement in ecstasy consumption underscores the pervasiveness and reach of this drug. This particular statistic reiterates the importance of public awareness and preventive programs targeting teenage substance abuse, while also emphasizing the necessity for ongoing worldwide research and intervention strategies to combat ecstasy usage.

In 2019, in Europe, 5.4% of drug law offences were related to ecstasy.

Illuminating the gravity of Ecstasy’s footprint within the realm of drug law violations, the 2019 European statistic showcases that a staggering 5.4% of such offences were tied to this particular narcotic. In the context of a blog post about Ecstasy statistics, this figure magnifies the complex relationship between Ecstasy and law enforcement agencies across the continent. Painting a vivid picture of the drug’s prevalence and its societal implications, it expertly sets the stage for a deeper dive into the varied dynamics of Ecstasy use, distribution, and criminal prosecution within Europe’s intricate legal jurisdictions.

In 2017, there were around 860,000 emergency department visits in the US related to the use of ecstasy.

Highlighting the compelling data that cited approximately 860,000 emergency department visits in the US in 2017 due to ecstasy use serves as a compelling testament to the real-world ramifications of this particular substance abuse. Such a figure breathes life into the often abstract concept of drug-related harm, underlining the immense strain that ecstasy imposes not just on the individuals using the drug, but also on our emergency healthcare services. This common thread tugs insistently at the curtain of public perception, compelling our audience to confront the stark reality of ecstasy-related incidents, a critical part of our wider conversation around Ecstasy Statistics.

In 2018, 5% of drivers caught by police in England and Wales tested positive for ecstasy (MDMA).

Illuminating the omnipresent yet hidden reality of drug use on our roads, the data that denotes a 5% ecstasy positive rate among drivers apprehended by police in England and Wales during 2018 becomes the throbbing pulse within our blog discourse on Ecstasy Statistics. This chilling revelation not only underscores the perturbing intersection of substance abuse and traffic safety, but it also highlights the persistent ubiquity of MDMA use, painting a visceral landscape of its societal implications, thereby fortifying our broader dialogue on the significance, prevalence, and ramifications of ecstasy consumption.

In 2019, 0.3% of the population of Ireland aged 15-34 years reported using ecstasy in the last month.

This intriguing insight—indicating that in 2019, just 0.3% of Ireland’s populace aged 15-34 admitted to consuming ecstasy in the past month—provides foundational footing for our deep-dive into the world of ecstasy use statistics. Absorbing this data breathes life into the narrative, highlighting the surprisingly low prevalence of ecstasy use within this particular age group in Ireland, and serves as a conversation starter about the factors contributing to such relatively sparse consumption. By implication, it questions how Ireland’s ecstasy use patterns compare to global trends, hinting at the need to explore further, comprehend regulatory policies, prevention programs, and societal attitudes towards this drug, thus crafting a comprehensive grasp on the topic.

In the USA in 2019, males aged 18-25 (4.5%) were more likely than females in the same age group (3.0%) to have used ecstasy in the past year.

Illuminating the prevalence of ecstasy use among young adults, the data highlights a perceptible gender disparity. With the revelation that in 2019, 4.5% of young men in the U.S. between the ages of 18-25 reported ecstasy use within the past twelve months, as compared to only 3.0% of women in the same demographic, we see the scope of ecstasy’s influence. This discrepancy shines a beacon on possible differing drug use habits, risk factors, and societal pressures between genders, lending itself to multifaceted discussions for better prevention and targeted interventions.

In 2019, 1.5% of young adults in Spain reported having used ecstasy at least once in their life (aged 15-34 years).

This captivating statistic sets the ground for assessing the prevalence of ecstasy use among young adults in Spain in 2019, providing a sharp snapshot of the demographic most affected. The 1.5% usage rate, concerning individuals between 15-34 years, not only underscores the age group’s considerable exposure to the party drug but also implies potential hygiene, health, and social issues that could emanate from its consumption. Its inclusion in a blog post about Ecstasy Statistics is instrumental in steering the conversation, sparking analysis about the contributing factors, and laying the foundation for future discussions and interventions targeted at this specific age bracket in society.

Between 2011 and 2015, 433 deaths in England and Wales involved ecstasy.

In the dialogue around recreational drug use, we often encounter varying narratives. However, the raw numbers present a stark picture of the risks involved. Casting a spotlight on the period between 2011 and 2015, there is a chilling revelation of 433 lives lost in England and Wales, purportedly involving ecstasy. When woven into a blog post on Ecstasy Statistics, this figure punctuates the discussion with the sobering weight of mortality, shaping perceptions and better informing readers about the potential dangers of ecstasy use.

Conclusion

Ecstasy use continues to eb prevalent, particularly among young adults and is a public health concern due to its harmful effects on physical and mental health. As indicated by our statistics, looking at age demographic usage trends, emergency room visit increases, and prevalence of misuse highlight the critical need for comprehensive prevention initiatives. By educating the public about the risks associated with ecstasy use, supporting research into effective treatment strategies, and enforcing stricter regulations on the distribution of such substances, efforts can be made to mitigate the impact of this drug on our society.

References

0. – https://www.www.dbdd.de

1. – https://www.pnsd.sanidad.gob.es

2. – https://www.www.emcdda.europa.eu

3. – https://www.www.drugabuse.gov

4. – https://www.www.gov.uk

5. – https://www.www.drugsandalcohol.ie

6. – https://www.www.ons.gov.uk

7. – https://www.www.aihw.gov.au

8. – https://www.www.ofdt.fr

9. – https://www.www.samhsa.gov

10. – https://www.www.cdc.gov

11. – https://www.www.ccsa.ca

12. – https://www.www.can.se

13. – https://www.www.unodc.org

14. – https://www.inpad.org.br

FAQs

What is Ecstasy?

Ecstasy, also known as MDMA or Molly, is a synthetic drug that alters mood and perception. It is chemically similar to both stimulants and hallucinogens, providing feelings of increased energy, pleasure, emotional warmth, and distorted sensory and time perception.

What are the common street names for Ecstasy?

Ecstasy is commonly known as MDMA, Molly, E, X, or Roll on the street.

What are the side effects of using Ecstasy?

Side effects of Ecstasy can include nausea, muscle cramping, involuntary teeth clenching, blurred vision, chills, and sweating. More serious effects can occur, such as high blood pressure, panic attacks, loss of consciousness, and in rare cases, severe hyperthermia and death.

How prevalent is Ecstasy use?

According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, in 2018, an estimated 3.1 million people aged 12 or older reported using MDMA at least once in their lifetime. Of this number, approximately 808,000 reported usage in the past year.

Is Ecstasy addictive?

While research on this is ongoing, some people who use MDMA report symptoms of addiction, including continued use despite negative physical or psychological consequences, tolerance, withdrawal effects, and engaging in a great deal of time using or recovering from the effects of MDMA.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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