GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Must-Know Age Discrimination Statistics [Current Data]

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Age discrimination statistics are interesting to get into as it is common among many aging members of the workforce. Older employees might be given less exciting projects and fewer opportunities for workplace advancements, as well as facing many stereotypes about retirement and other issues. However, they are just as successful and eager to work as their younger counterparts. 

We know that age is often the last unspoken and accepted form of discrimination in the workplace. We know that the pandemic has exacerbated age discrimination in both the workplace and the recruitment process. We also know that once made redundant, older workers are more likely to drift into long-term unemployment than their younger counterparts. 

We will be discussing age discrimination statistics generally, as well as its statistics for gender, workplaces and professions.

Age Discrimination: The Most Important Statistics

Age discrimination results in an estimated 6.3 million cases of depression globally. 

Unemployment among the over-50s reached 426,000 in the final three months of 2020, a 48 % increase on the previous year.

75% of adults aged 60 and over and 65% of adults aged 45 to 59 believe their age puts them at a disadvantage when looking for work.

Age discrimination statistics

Nearly 80% of older employees reported they’ve seen or experienced age discrimination in the workplace.

 Long-term unemployed job seekers above 55 years were over 36% as compared with 23% of job seekers aged between 18-54 years of age.

 Around 25% of the workforce is older than 55.

Age discrimination results in an estimated 6.3 million cases of depression globally. 

Age discrimination happens to younger people in employment, health, housing, and politics. 

If 5% more people aged 55 and above were employed, they’d generate AUD$48 million for the economy in Australia.

Age discrimination statistics trends

The number of age discrimination claims has increased sharply over the last year; as official figures have shown there were 3,668 complaints of age discrimination made to employment tribunals in 2020.

This has increased from 2,112 in 2019, yielding an increase of 74% and the largest rise of any complaint.

Unemployment among the over-50s reached 426,000 in the final three months of 2020, a 48 % increase from the previous year.

Redundancies in this age group also reached 284,685 last year, a 79% year-on-year rise.

Older adults are the fastest-growing part of the American workforce.

Two years from now, nearly 25% of the workforce will be 55 and older. 

Older workers do not cost more than younger workers. Older workers are not technology averse and their longevity adds a lot of value to your workplace.

Does gender factor into age discrimination?

Age discrimination increases with age. 

75% of adults aged 60 and over and 65% of adults aged 45 to 59 believe their age puts them at a disadvantage when looking for work. 

Nearly half of those under 30 and about 33% of those aged 30 to 44 said they feel their age is a benefit. 

With respect to gender, 75% of the women over the age of 45 reported that their age puts them at a disadvantage when looking for work, compared with 65% of older men.

Nearly 2 out of 3 women aged 50 and older are regularly discriminated against.

6,643 women paint a disheartening picture of discrimination affecting women of all ages, ethnicities and races, with significant implications of their health and longevity.

Age discrimination is the type of discrimination among women age 50 and older who experience discrimination regularly with 48% reporting bias based on their age.

Do certain professions stand out when it comes to age discrimination?

Ageism may hamper older adults’ interactions with healthcare clinicians or be a chronic stressor for older adults.

The annual health cost in the United States, including the undertreatment or overtreatment of common health conditions, is $63 billion.  

Nearly 20% Americans age 50 and older say they have experienced discrimination in healthcare settings, which can result in inappropriate or inadequate care.  

About 29% of respondents who reported frequent healthcare discrimination developed new or worsening disabilities over a four-year period.

A 2021 AARP survey showed that most consumers aged 50-plus want marketing campaigns to grow up. 

Another survey by AARP in 2019 revealed that, people aged 50 years and above represent only 15% of adults in online media images and are seven times more likely than younger adults to be portrayed negatively.

The median age for a manager in America’s advertising agencies is 37, and the average age of a creative person in the industry is only 28.

People aged 55 and older now control 70% of all personal wealth in the United States, based on data in the Federal Reserve’s “Survey of Consumer Finances.

The Bureau of Labour Statistics revealed one-third of the U.S. workforce is older than 50.

AARP reviewed work images and older people turned up in only 13%.  

Pew Research Centre found 69% of people between 55 and 73 owned a smartphone.

Less than 5% of the reviewed images showed older people handling technology.  

Recent ads have described being 50 years old as “basically dead” and characterized older people as selfish and out of touch.

Age discrimination’s impact on the workplace 

Age discrimination accounts for about 20-25% of Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) cases. 

Two-thirds of Americans aged 45 and over have seen or experienced age discrimination on the job.  

50% of retirees retired earlier than expected.

According to a survey conducted in Japan in August 2021, more than 11% of female respondents in the age group of 30 to 39 years stated that they feel opposed to female superiors at work. 

The age group of women in their sixties showed the least bias against women in leadership positions at 10%.

Do millennials and Gen Z experience age discrimination like their older counterparts?

In the 2021 Fast Company-Harris Poll, 36% of younger millennials and Gen Z say they’ve faced workplace ageism, often due to a perceived lack of experience.

44% of this group agree that people their age are viewed as inexperienced, versus 28% of older millennials and Gen Xs up to age 56.  

38% of Gen Z and younger millennials (25-32 years) as well as 30% of older millennials (33-40years) reported that they are viewed as out of touch at work.

A Center for Innovative Public Health Research (CIPHR) survey revealed 73% of 18 to 24-year-olds and 50% of 25 to 34-year-olds have experienced discriminatory attitudes and behaviors at work or during the recruitment process. 

A LinkedIn study revealed 35% of postings for entry-level positions require prior relevant work experience and 60.3% of entry-level software and IT services demand prior work. 

A Dell study also revealed 77% of Gen Z employees are willing to be technology mentors to others at work.

Supplementary Statistics

Around two-thirds (65.3%) of U.S. workers age 45 to 74 say they have seen or experienced age discrimination in the workplace.

A significant portion of the U.S. workforce is being subjected to unfair treatment based on their age. This statistic is an important piece of evidence that should be taken into account when discussing the issue of age discrimination in the workplace.

Age discrimination claims filed by employees aged 65 and older doubled from 1990 to 2018.

Despite the passing of laws to protect older workers, the problem is still very much alive and growing. It is a call to action for employers to take steps to ensure that their workplaces are free from age discrimination and that older workers are treated with the same respect and dignity as their younger counterparts.

In 2014, approximately 64% of Americans believed that age discrimination is a serious problem in the United States.

A majority of Americans recognize the seriousness of this issue, and that it is a problem that needs to be addressed. This statistic is an important piece of evidence that can be used to illustrate the need for further action to combat age discrimination.

In 2021, 74% of respondents in an Irish survey experienced age discrimination in the job-seeking process.

This highlights the need for greater awareness and action to combat this issue, and serves as a call to arms for those who are passionate about creating a fairer and more equitable job market.

In 2019, age discrimination complaints represented 21.4% of all discrimination complaints received by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

Age discrimination is still a major issue in the United States, and that it is a problem that needs to be addressed. It also serves as a warning to employers that they need to be aware of the potential for age discrimination in their workplace and take steps to prevent it.

Only 3% of age discrimination claims are successful in the United States.

Despite the legal protections in place, age discrimination is still a major issue in the workplace. It also serves as a warning to employers that they should be aware of the potential consequences of their actions and take steps to ensure that they are not discriminating against employees based on their age.

In the UK, over 14% of people aged 50 to 74 feel they have been treated poorly at work due to their age.

A significant portion of the population aged 50 to 74 have experienced unfair treatment due to their age, and that this is an issue that needs to be addressed. It serves as a call to action for employers to ensure that their workplaces are free from age discrimination and that all employees are treated with respect and dignity.

80% of older Americans say that they either experienced age discrimination personally or know someone who has.

Age discrimination is not just an isolated issue, but rather a widespread problem that affects many older Americans. This statistic is a call to action for us to take steps to combat age discrimination and ensure that all people, regardless of age, are treated with respect and dignity.

In 2019, the financial services sector in Australia experienced the highest rate of age discrimination complaints at 18.6%.

This highlights the need for greater awareness and action to be taken to address this issue. It is a call to action for employers, employees, and policy makers to take steps to ensure that age discrimination is not tolerated in the workplace. This statistic is a powerful reminder that age discrimination is still a problem in Australia and that more needs to be done to ensure that everyone is treated fairly and with respect.

In Canada, age discrimination is the most common type of discrimination complaint filed by employees, representing 33% of all complaints.

It is not just a problem in certain industries or regions. It is a problem that affects all Canadians, regardless of their age or occupation. This statistic is a call to action for employers to take steps to ensure that their workplaces are free from age discrimination.

In France, more than 45% of employees aged 45-49 believe that they have been affected by age discrimination during recruitment processes.

This highlights the need for greater awareness and action to be taken to combat this form of discrimination and ensure that all individuals are given a fair chance in the recruitment process.

According to a European-level survey, about 21% of respondents experienced age discrimination during job interviews in 2015.

Even in this day and age, many people are still facing discrimination based on their age when trying to secure employment. This statistic is an important piece of evidence that should not be overlooked when discussing the issue of age discrimination.

In India, 62% of employees believe that ageism exists in organizations, and 34% have experienced some form of age discrimination in their career.

A majority of employees are aware of the existence of age discrimination, and a significant portion have experienced it firsthand. This is an important issue that needs to be addressed, and this statistic serves as a call to action for organizations to take steps to combat ageism in the workplace.

In New Zealand, approximately 20% of people aged 55 and older reported experiencing age discrimination in their workplace.

Even in a country that prides itself on its progressive values, age discrimination is still a reality for many older workers. This statistic is a call to action for employers to take steps to ensure that their workplaces are free from age discrimination and that all employees are treated with respect and dignity.

In 2020, South Korea had the highest rate of age discrimination in Asia, with 20.3% of employees experiencing age-related discrimination.

This highlights the need for greater awareness and action to combat this issue, and serves as a call to action for those who are in a position to make a difference. By bringing attention to this statistic, we can help to create a more equitable and inclusive workplace environment for all.

In 2019, 64% of Americans surveyed said that age discrimination was a serious problem in the United States, especially for older adults.

A majority of Americans recognize the serious problem of age discrimination, particularly for older adults. This statistic serves as a call to action for individuals, organizations, and policy makers to take steps to address this issue.

Age discrimination claims increased by 8% in the United Kingdom between 2016 and 2018.

This serves as a call to arms for those who are passionate about protecting the rights of older people.

In a 2017 survey, 87% of U.S. workers aged 45 and older believe that laws are necessary to protect them from age discrimination in the workplace.

The majority of those aged 45 and older are aware of the issue and believe that legal protection is necessary. This is an important point to make in a blog post about age discrimination statistics, as it highlights the importance of having laws in place to protect older workers from discrimination.

Conclusion

Even if we choose to live in disbelief, we cannot turn our heads away from the numbers that ensure that age discrimination is well existing in the world unfortunately. We have seen statistics discussing its existence whether in the workforce by gender or even for younger generations.

However, even younger people (especially millennials and Gen Z) reported that they also have suffered from age discrimination. This just shows that age discrimination can go both ways and does not just target one segment of the population.

FAQs

What is age discrimination in the workplace?

Age discrimination in the workplace is when an employee is treated differently based on their age.

What are the laws that protect against age discrimination?

The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) are the two main laws that protect against age discrimination.

What are some examples of age discrimination?

Examples of age discrimination include not hiring or promoting someone based on their age, or forcing an employee to retire at a certain age.

What are the consequences of age discrimination?

The consequences of age discrimination can include lost wages, emotional distress, and legal fees.

What can employers do to prevent age discrimination?

Employers can prevent age discrimination by implementing policies that prohibit discrimination based on age, providing age diversity and sensitivity training, and creating a workplace culture that values and respects all employees regardless of age.

References:

Journal of Social Issues: “Age discrimination, the right to life, and COVID-19 vaccination in countries with limited resources”, cited in February 2023 (Source)

CNBC: “How Older Workers can Push Back against the Reality Of Ageism”, cited in February 2023 (Source)

World Health Organization: “Ageism is a global challenge: UN”, cited in February 2023 (Source)

Vervoe: “34 Age Discrimination Facts That May Shock You and Your Workplace”, cited in February 2023 (Source)

Built In: “Ageism in the Workplace: Statistics to Know”, cited in February 2023 (Source)

Fast Company: “Millennials Face Yet Another Workplace Challenge – Ageism”, cited in February 2023 (Source)

Unleash: “Breaking Gen Z Ageism Barriers”, cited in February 2023 (Source)

Medical Economics: “Age discrimination may be taking toll on health of older adults across U.S.”, cited in February 2023 (Source)

UCI Health: “Age discrimination may be taking toll on health of older adults across U.S.”, cited in February 2023 (Source)

AARP: “Age Discrimination Among Workers Age 50-Plus”, cited in February 2023 (Source)

Built In: “Ageism in the Workplace: Statistics to Know”, cited in February 2023 (Source)

People Management: “Age discrimination claims rise by 74 per cent during pandemic, analysis shows”, cited in February 2023 (Source)

Adecco Group: “Fighting Ageism In The Era Of No Retirement: TOP 5 Trends From The World Of Work”, cited in February 2023 (Source)

Zipflix – Statistieken over Leeftijdsdiscriminatie

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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