GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Womens Rights Middle East Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Womens Rights Middle East Statistics

  • Only 24.3% of women in the Middle East and North Africa region are part of the labour force, the lowest in the world.
  • In the Middle East and North Africa, 44% of women have experienced gender-based violence in their lifetime.
  • Around 27 million women in the Middle East and North Africa are illiterate, more than twice the number of men.
  • Only 5% of CEOs in Middle East are women.
  • In Saudi Arabia, women only won the right to drive in 2018.
  • The World Economic Forum finds the Middle East and North Africa the world’s most difficult regions for women, with 14 of 15 countries there rated in the bottom 30 for gender equality.
  • Approximately 60% of women in Egypt have experienced street sexual harassment.
  • In Jordan, 95% of women lack legal protection from discrimination in the work place.
  • In Lebanon, less than 5% of national parliamentary seats are held by women.

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The narrative surrounding women’s rights in the Middle East, often loaded with stereotypical assumptions and misunderstood cultural contexts, can be better comprehended through the lens of statistics. This blog post aims to delve into the empirical data and evidence that depict a clearer picture of the reality of the status of women’s rights in the Middle East. From key statistical indicators such as educational attainment, labor force participation, political representation, to gender equality indices, we provide an informational and statistical journey that reveals not just disparities but also progress being made in the fight for women’s rights in the region.

The Latest Womens Rights Middle East Statistics Unveiled

Only 24.3% of women in the Middle East and North Africa region are part of the labour force, the lowest in the world.

Undoubtedly, the percentage of women participating in the workforce in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region being a mere 24.3% – the lowest globally – paints a profound picture of the stark gender disparities embedded in this region’s labor market. Highlighting this figure is vital in a blog post discussing women’s rights in the Middle East as it indicates structural issues, such as cultural beliefs, restrictive policies, and educational opportunities, that limit women’s economic empowerment. This number is also a bellwether for gains not yet attained in gender equality in the region, and represents enormous untapped potential. Unleashing this potential could lead to significant socio-economic benefits and hasten the march towards achieving fundamental women’s rights in the MENA region.

In the Middle East and North Africa, 44% of women have experienced gender-based violence in their lifetime.

The stark reality that nearly half – 44% – of women residing in the Middle East and North Africa have endured gender-based violence in their lifespan shines a glaring spotlight on the urgent strides still needed in the realm of women’s rights in these regions. This jarring number not only underscores the prevalence of such oppressive circumstances, but also sets the stage for deeper conversations surrounding societal norms, legal protections, and education. When viewed through the lens of women’s rights, narrative emerges: an ongoing saga of resilience, the need for reform, and the ongoing fight for equality. This statistic captures both the challenging hurdles women face daily, and the vital importance of advocacy, change, and awareness in a region grappling with gender disparity.

Around 27 million women in the Middle East and North Africa are illiterate, more than twice the number of men.

Highlighting the struggle for gender equality, the fact that around 27 million women in the Middle East and North Africa are illiterate, a figure over twice that of men, sharply underscores the stark educational disparity faced by women in these regions. The imbalance in literacy rates has grave implications for women’s rights, limiting their economic opportunities, hindering their social and political participation, and ultimately reinforcing subjugation under a largely male-dominated society. Consequently, bringing attention to such statistics is critical to advocating for increased educational opportunities for women, thereby empowering them to break free from the cycle of illiteracy and inequality.

Only 5% of CEOs in Middle East are women.

Highlighting that merely 5% of CEOs in the Middle East are women underscores a stark gender imbalance in the region’s corporate leadership, serving as an indication of persisting stereotypes and obstacles that curtail women’s progress in their professions. Within the discourse of a blog post on Women’s Rights in Middle East Statistics, this number not only fosters a tangible understanding of the existing inequalities women face but also amplifies the urgent need for policy reforms and societal changes that encourage female participation and representation in decision-making roles. This potent statistic gives a voice to a widespread issue, stirring dialogue and action towards women’s empowerment and equal opportunities in the Middle East.

In Saudi Arabia, women only won the right to drive in 2018.

The 2018 landmark event which allowed Saudi Arabian women the legal right to drive throws a spotlight on the ongoing evolution of women’s rights in the Middle East. In a society that has historically been dominated by a patriarchal system, this milestone signifies a progressive shift. This single statististic offers a snapshot into the broader context of women’s empowerment and highlights the pace of social reform in the region. Shedding light on this statistic in a blog post about Women’s Rights Middle East Statistics serves as a pivotal point of reference and a testament to the positive strides taken towards more equity and freedom.

The World Economic Forum finds the Middle East and North Africa the world’s most difficult regions for women, with 14 of 15 countries there rated in the bottom 30 for gender equality.

Unleashing the spotlight on the wrenching challenges faced by women in the Middle East and North Africa, the World Economic Forum’s alarming findings serve as a wake-up call to global audiences. In a region where 14 out of 15 countries find their spot in the bottom 30 for gender equality, it paints a dire picture of women’s rights scenario. Demonstrating an acute need for substantial shifts and advancements, this statistic is integral to any discourse revolving around women’s rights in the Middle East, providing concrete evidence of the massive inequalities that prevail. Furthermore, it propels the conversation towards urgent and necessary policy changes, lending credence and urgency to the call for gender equality in these regions.

Approximately 60% of women in Egypt have experienced street sexual harassment.

Shining light on the disturbing figure, ‘Approximately 60% of women in Egypt have experienced street sexual harassment,’ offers a stark illustration of the pervasive threats to women’s safety and rights in the Middle East. Within a blog post focused on Women’s Rights Middle East statistics, this chilling datum not merely quantifies an aspect of women’s daily lived reality in Egypt, but it projectively echoes the voices of countless silenced women, tacitly urging for immediate redressal mechanisms and substantial policy changes to better protect women. By isolating this statistic, the full weight of the systemic violence occurring against women in this region is underscored, notably fuelling advocacy, awareness, and action for enhanced women’s rights.

In Jordan, 95% of women lack legal protection from discrimination in the work place.

Highlighting the statistic ‘In Jordan, 95% of women lack legal protection from discrimination in the workplace’ subtly underscores a powerful narrative. Buried within these numbers is the stark reality of the glaring gender inequality persisting in Middle Eastern societies. This data packs a punch, revealing the urgency for legislative change and enforcement in countries like Jordan. It forms the backbone of the discourse on women’s rights in the Middle East -both the challenges confronted and the milestones yet to achieve. This statistic serves as a yardstick, measuring the extent of change required to foster an equitable work environment free from gender-based discrimination, thus shouting out for reforms to safeguard women’s rights in every aspect.

In Lebanon, less than 5% of national parliamentary seats are held by women.

Underscoring the longstanding issue of gender inequality in the Middle East is the startling figure: in Lebanon, women’s representation in national parliament numbers less than 5%. This percentage signifies a worrying discrepancy between the sexes when it comes to political empowerment, a key element of overall societal influence and status. Considering the ever-growing global emphasis on gender equality and women’s rights, such a statistic serves to highlight the adverse conditions still prevailing in the region. For a well-rounded analysis of women’s rights, this deep-seated political underrepresentation spotlights a challenging frontier for Lebanon, and by extension, the Middle East’s collective progress towards gender equity.

Conclusion

The statistical analysis on women’s rights in the Middle East sheds light on the significant discrepancies and hardships that women encounter in the region. Despite certain strides in gender equality legislation, statistical evidence points to continued limitations in women’s rights. It’s important to dig deeper into these statistics not only to understand the challenges that Middle Eastern women face, but also to help devise effective strategies for driving progressive change in gender inequality, thus paving the way for the realization of comprehensive women’s rights. These statistics spur the need for global outreach and advocacy for women’s empowerment in the Middle East.

References

0. – https://www.www.unicef.org

1. – https://www.databank.worldbank.org

2. – https://www.www.worldbank.org

3. – https://www.www.strategyand.pwc.com

4. – https://www.data.worldbank.org

5. – https://www.www.weforum.org

6. – https://www.www.bbc.com

7. – https://www.dcaf.ch

8. – https://www.www.unwomen.org

FAQs

How are women's rights perceived in the Middle East?

Women's rights in the Middle East are largely influenced by cultural, historical, and religious factors. While many Middle Eastern countries have made efforts to advance women's rights, they continue to face significant barriers. Predominantly, women have limited access to education, health care, employment, and political representation, and are subject to discriminatory laws regarding marriage, divorce, and family life.

Are there any differences in women's rights between different Middle Eastern countries?

Yes, the rights of women vary significantly throughout the Middle East. Some countries, like Jordan and Lebanon, have more liberal attitudes towards women's rights, while others, like Saudi Arabia and Iran, are traditionally more conservative. However, it's important to note that in all these countries, there are ongoing efforts for change and women's empowerment.

Have there been advancements regarding women's rights in the Middle East?

Yes, there have been notable advancements towards women's rights in some Middle Eastern countries, such as Saudi Arabia's decision to grant women the right to drive in 2018. In other countries, like Jordan and Lebanon, there have been progressive changes to laws regarding violence against women. However, these advances are not uniform across the region and more progress is needed.

Is female literacy a challenge in the Middle East?

In certain countries, female literacy is indeed a challenge due to various reasons including lack of access to education for girls and cultural beliefs. However, it's important to also highlight that there's been a steady growth in female education and literacy rates in the region over the past couple of decades.

What role does religion play in women's rights in the Middle East?

Religion, especially Islam, plays a significant role in shaping societal norms and legal frameworks that impact women's rights. While the Qur'an affirms the importance of women's rights, interpretations of these texts in law and practice can restrict rights in areas such as marriage, divorce, and inheritance. However, it needs to be recognized that different countries and communities interpret and implement religious teachings differently. Thus, religion's impact on women's rights varies across the region.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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