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United States Election Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important United States Election Statistics

  • The voter turnout in the United States Presidential Election 2020 was about 66.7%, the highest since 1900.
  • In the 2016 US Presidential Election, Donald Trump won the election with 304 Electoral Votes.
  • In the 2020 US Presidential Election, Joe Biden received more than 81 million total votes.
  • Pennsylvania has voted for the eventual president in 20 of the last 26 elections.
  • In the 2016 election, 42% of eligible voters did not vote.
  • 39.3% of voters reported voting early in the 2020 election.
  • In the 2020 US Presidential Election, Joe Biden received 306 electoral votes.
  • In the 2012 Presidential Election, Barack Obama received 65,915,795 popular votes.
  • In the 2012 Presidential Election, the voter turnout was 58.6%.
  • Post-Roosevelt, Republicans have won the White House in 9 elections, and Democrats in 8.
  • In 2020, out of the total number of people who voted by mail, 65% were Democrats.
  • In the 20th century, four US presidents have been elected without winning the popular vote.
  • From 1980-2020, the state of Ohio has voted for the successful presidential candidate in every election.
  • As of 2020 election, no third-party candidate has won a U.S. presidential election.
  • In the 2020 General Election, the Republicans took a total of 212 seats in the House of Representatives.
  • In the 2020 United States Senate elections, 35 out of 100 seats were contested.
  • Women voters outnumbered men by nearly 10 million in the 2016 Presidential Election.
  • The swing state Florida changed hands between parties 10 times in 18 elections from 1980 to 2020.

Table of Contents

Welcome to our in-depth exploration of United States Election Statistics. This blog post will paint a comprehensive picture of our nation’s electoral past and present, using hard data and statistical analysis. We delve into voting trends, demographic influences, and historical comparisons, resulting in a multi-faceted understanding of U.S. electoral behavior. Whether you’re a political enthusiast, a student of statistics, or simply a curious observer, this analysis offers key insights into the blueprint of American democracy.

The Latest United States Election Statistics Unveiled

The voter turnout in the United States Presidential Election 2020 was about 66.7%, the highest since 1900.

Shedding light on the significance of the aforementioned data, the unprecedented 66.7% voter turnout in the 2020 United States Presidential Election paints a vivid picture of a politically engaged and galvanized citizenry. This surge, the highest seen since 1900, indicates a meteoric rise in public participation, underscoring a renewed sense of civic duty and engagement amongst the populace. In a blog post focused on US Election Statistics, such a noteworthy uptick provides valuable insights into the shifting political landscape and public involvement, offering a rich point of data for evaluations and predictions about the future of the electoral process.

In the 2016 US Presidential Election, Donald Trump won the election with 304 Electoral Votes.

The intriguing figure of 304 electoral votes for Donald Trump in the 2016 US Presidential Election serves as a vibrant cornerstone in understanding United States election dynamics. It attests the potency of the Electoral College system, where the pursuit of these electors often outweighs the popular vote in determining who will ascend to the office of president. This statistic, furthermore, invites contemplation on the strategic importance of swing states, as such states carry substantial weight in the electoral votes tally, potentially swaying the election outcome in one direction or another. Thus, this electoral vote count offers a vivid snapshot of the unique notes that play in the symphony of US political strategy and competition.

In the 2020 US Presidential Election, Joe Biden received more than 81 million total votes.

Drawing from the intriguing tapestry of the 2020 US Presidential Election, the fact that Joe Biden garnered over 81 million total votes operates as a potent emblem of democratic participation. As the highest recorded vote tally for any presidential candidate in American history, this statistic underscores the heightened voter engagement witnessed in this election, reflecting seismic shifts in voter turnout trends, political engagement, and, potentially, a changing political landscape. When analyzed in the broader spectrum of United States election statistics, this unprecedented number offers profound insights into the dynamics of electoral participation, the potency of voter mobilization strategies, and the pivotal role of populous states, thereby enriching our understanding of American electoral politics.

Pennsylvania has voted for the eventual president in 20 of the last 26 elections.

Dubbed as the ‘bellwether’ state, Pennsylvania’s electoral significance showcases its proverbial knack for picking the eventual occupant of the Oval Office with incredible accuracy in 20 of the past 26 elections. This trend serves as a pivotal touchstone in our blog post on United States Election Statistics, giving us a nuanced understanding of the subtle yet decisive role states like Pennsylvania play in shaping the political landscape of America. It offers a fascinating glance into the predilections of the Keystone State’s voters, which often mirror the national sentiment, resulting in a dramatic influence on the final declaration from the electoral college.

In the 2016 election, 42% of eligible voters did not vote.

Highlighting that 42% of eligible voters did not participate in the 2016 election serves as a sobering reminder of the potential influence that non-voters have in shaping the political landscape in the United States. This uncast vote population is a significant statistic, almost representing half of the eligible citizens. Such a high rate of abstention may cast doubts on the representativeness of the elected office holders, questioning the extent to which they truly embody the will of all constituents. Moreover, this figure points to the importance of continued efforts to engage this sizable segment of the population in the electoral process, through increased voter education and eliminating barriers to voting.

39.3% of voters reported voting early in the 2020 election.

Delving into the remarkable shifts in voter behavior during the 2020 U.S. election, the notable figure is provided by the 39.3% of voters who were reported to have voted early. Whether it be a reflection of pandemic-induced concerns, increasing accessibility to early voting mechanisms, or amplified political engagement, this dramatic rise in early voting contributes significantly to our understanding of the transformations that were affecting electoral behavior. From a macro perspective, it underlines a changing dynamic in voter participation and offers a compelling narrative of how American citizens were adapting their voting habits in a tumultuous, pandemic-ridden political landscape. This considerable early turnout provides valuable groundwork for future studies on predictive polling, election operation, voter accessibility, and can gauge campaigning strategies in corresponding to this trend.

In the 2020 US Presidential Election, Joe Biden received 306 electoral votes.

The highlight of the 2020 US Presidential Election – Joe Biden garnering 306 electoral votes – underscores a monumental moment in the United States electoral history that is vital in a blog post about US Election Statistics. It serves as a key indicator of the weight of every state’s voice in the electoral college. Moreover, this figure embodies the intricate interplay of demographics, geography, and their influence on electoral outcomes. It cements the strength of a robust democracy that accommodates diverse perspectives and vividly reflects the fluctuating American political landscape over time.

In the 2012 Presidential Election, Barack Obama received 65,915,795 popular votes.

A striking revelation in the 2012 Presidential Election was Barack Obama’s sweeping popularity, as demonstrated by his 65,915,795 popular votes. This number isn’t just impressive on its own—when contrasted with other electoral statistics or historical data, it serves as a potent barometer of the mood of the American electorate, the effectiveness of Obama’s campaign strategy, and the resonance of his platform with voters nationwide. It offers valuable insights that can guide future political endeavors and opinion polling, as well as sharpen our understanding of swings in national sentiment.

In the 2012 Presidential Election, the voter turnout was 58.6%.

Highlighting the 2012 Presidential Election statistic of a 58.6% voter turnout provides relevant insight into the degree of public participation and political engagement of the U.S. citizenry during that specific election period. It serves as an important barometer or reference point allowing for comparisons to be made with voter turnouts of other election years. Such comparisons can indicate trends, affirm theories or generate further questions about voter behavior, policy impact or potential inefficiencies in the democratic process. This statistic is a crucial piece when painting the vast election-data landscape in the United States, setting a context for deeper discussions in the realm of election politics.

Post-Roosevelt, Republicans have won the White House in 9 elections, and Democrats in 8.

Treading the path of electoral examination, advertently we stumble on a riveting fact. Post-Roosevelt, the scales of US Presidential victories show an intriguing tilt, as Republicans have emerged victorious in 9 subsequent elections, slightly outpacing the Democrats who have claimed the coveted office 8 times. This meticulously observed pattern not only highlights the oscillating political preferences of the nation over the years, but it underscores the intense competition and near balance of political power that exists within the US. It adds an engaging dialogue point, framing the fluctuating dynamics of US presidential elections to enthuse the statistic-compelling narrative of the blog post.

In 2020, out of the total number of people who voted by mail, 65% were Democrats.

This particular 2020 statistic reflects a potentially pivotal trend in voting behavior concerning United States elections. Being able to identify 65% of mail-in voters as Democrats provides profound evidence of partisanship in voting mechanisms, significantly impacting election dynamics. It gives insights into Democrats’ preference for non-traditional voting methods, possibly due to COVID-19 concerns or convenience, which can notably sway the electoral results. Such findings compel strategists, pollsters, and observers to scrutinize convenience voting options further in their analyses of election outcomes and predictions. Therefore, it is an eye-opening statistic that adds value to overall discussions about the dynamics of United States Election Statistics.

In the 20th century, four US presidents have been elected without winning the popular vote.

Highlighting the incongruity of the electoral process, the fact that four US presidents in the 20th century were elected without securing a popular vote majority provides an intriguing reflection on the nuances of the US electoral system. In the panorama of American election statistics, this serves as an emblematic reminder of the inherent complexities and potential disparities between popular mandates and ultimate electoral outcomes. It underscores the relative power of the Electoral College system, suggests potential areas for electoral reform, and echoes an ongoing debate about the true representation of voters’ intent.

From 1980-2020, the state of Ohio has voted for the successful presidential candidate in every election.

Illuminating the curious knack of Ohio, the correlation between this state’s electoral outcome and the overall presidential victor from 1980-2020 is remarkable in a blog post scrutinizing United Sates election statistics. Its unique pattern of consistently voting in favor of the successful presidential candidate places Ohio as a bellwether state, giving it a noteworthy predictive power. Its alignment with the national electoral dynamics underlines the demographic and political diversity of Ohio. A look at this statistic not only underscores Ohio’s crucial role in tipping the scales, but also provides an intriguing facet to the discerning patterns within the complex tapestry of the US electoral landscape.

As of 2020 election, no third-party candidate has won a U.S. presidential election.

Illuminating the stronghold of the bipartisan system in U.S. presidential politics, the statistic pointing out that no third-party candidate has ever emerged victorious in a U.S. presidential election as of 2020 forms a crucial cornerstone of understanding the voting patterns and tendencies of the American electorate. This statistic underscores the deep roots and the dominant incumbency of the Democratic and Republican platforms in the U.S. political landscape, challenging prospective third-party contenders and reinforcing the lasting sway of the two major parties over voter preferences and affiliations. This, in turn, hints at the monumental task of shifting the political equilibrium for anyone attempting to alter the long-lasting duopoly.

In the 2020 General Election, the Republicans took a total of 212 seats in the House of Representatives.

Diving into the depth of the 2020 General Election, the revelation that the Republicans secured 212 seats in the House of Representatives serves as a crucial pivot, elucidating the balance of political power within the United States. This particular figure not only offers an insight into the support base for the Republicans, but it also determines the legislative direction of the nation. As such, this statistic illuminates how policy debates might unfold and shape national discourse, making it an essential piece of information for anyone desiring to understand the complexity of US election statistics.

In the 2020 United States Senate elections, 35 out of 100 seats were contested.

Highlighting the 2020 United States Senate elections, where a significant 35% of the seats were up for contention, offers a vivid representation of the unpredictable dynamism and fluidity inherent within American democracy. In a closer investigation of U.S election statistics, this high number underscores the stakes of these political competitions, as any election could dramatically shift the balance of power within the Senate. As such, this particular statistic becomes a springboard into the deep waters of electoral strategy, voter behavior, and the perpetual struggle for party dominance in the United States.

Women voters outnumbered men by nearly 10 million in the 2016 Presidential Election.

The fact that nearly 10 million more women voted than men in the 2016 Presidential Election highlights a pivotal shift in the electoral landscape. This discrepancy in voter turnout emphasizes the growing political engagement and influence of women in the United States. As the gender gap in voter participation widens, it drives a spotlight towards issues uniquely important to this demographic, potentially leading to campaign strategies, party platforms, and policy proposals more keenly focused on their concerns. In this vein, studying such trends becomes invaluable in predicting election outcomes and assessing the pulse of American democracy.

The swing state Florida changed hands between parties 10 times in 18 elections from 1980 to 2020.

Shining a spotlight on the fickle nature of Florida’s electoral choices, the statistic indicates the state’s dynamic political landscape. From 1980 to 2020, in a series of 18 elections, this highly coveted swing state has ping-ponged back and forth between parties 10 times, highlighting its unpredictability. When it comes to analyzing US Election Statistics, such a trend points to the critical and possibly decisive role Florida plays in the electoral outcome. Its inconsistent loyalty illustrates that predictive models for this state need to account for a broad spectrum of influencing factors and signals to aspiring candidates the need to tailor their strategies and connect more directly with Florida’s diverse electorate.

Conclusion

The complexities of United States Election Statistics reveal a multifaceted national narrative. Patterns of voter turnout, partisan shifts, and the influential variables of age, gender, race, and education level provide insightful understanding of the democratic processes at work. Statistical analyses illuminate the critical role each vote plays in shaping the nation’s political landscape. Clearly, the power of quantitative data in election statistics serves not only to inform, but to enhance our participation in the democratic process.

References

0. – https://www.www.census.gov

1. – https://www.www.npr.org

2. – https://www.ballotpedia.org

3. – https://www.www.nytimes.com

4. – https://www.history.house.gov

5. – https://www.uselectionatlas.org

6. – https://www.www.businessinsider.com

7. – https://www.theconversation.com

8. – https://www.www.270towin.com

9. – https://www.www.history.com

10. – https://www.www.britannica.com

11. – https://www.www.bbc.com

12. – https://www.www.pewresearch.org

13. – https://www.www.newsweek.com

14. – https://www.apnews.com

FAQs

How often are presidential elections held in the United States?

Presidential elections are held every four years on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November.

How many electoral votes are required for a presidential candidate to win the election?

A candidate must receive at least 270 of the total 538 electoral votes to win the presidential election.

What is the role of the popular vote in U.S Presidential Elections?

The popular vote determines the electors, who are part of the Electoral College, from each state. These electors then cast votes which decide the president. However, it’s theoretically possible (and has happened a few times in history) for a candidate to win the popular vote but lose the Presidential election due to receiving fewer electoral votes.

How is the winner of the Vice Presidential election decided?

The Vice President is not elected separately in the United States. The Vice President is chosen by the Presidential nominee as a running mate and is therefore elected as part of a ticket with the Presidential candidate.

What happens if no presidential candidate gets 270 electoral votes?

If no candidate receives a majority of electoral votes, the Presidential election leaves the Electoral College process and moves to the U.S. House of Representatives. The House elects the President from the 3 Presidential candidates who received the most electoral votes. Each state delegation has one vote.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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