GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Somali Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Somali Statistics

  • Nearly 15% of the Somali population live in absolute poverty.
  • The average life expectancy in Somalia is around 56.6 years.
  • Less than 40% of the Somali population have access to health services.
  • Approximately 73% of Somalia's population is rural.
  • As of 2021, the population of Somalia is estimated to be around 16 million.
  • About 50% of the Somali population is under the age of 15.
  • The literacy rate in Somalia is one of the lowest in the world at 37.8%.
  • Only about 17% of people in Somalia have access to electricity.
  • Around 5.9 million people in Somalia need humanitarian aid.
  • The median age in Somalia is 18.4, one of the lowest median ages in the world.
  • Roughly 9 out of 10 Somalis are Sunni Muslims.
  • Fertility rate in Somalia is high with an average of 6.12 children born per woman.
  • In 2019, Somalia's gross domestic product (GDP) was an estimated $5.53 billion.
  • As of 2018, only 15% of the Somali population had access to clean drinking water.
  • About 51% of the population in Somalia is engaged in the labor force.
  • In the UK, the Somali community is the largest refugee group, numbering around 100,000.

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Delving into the heart of East Africa, our blog post today brings you an insightful analysis of Somali Statistics. As facts and figures weave the most telling story about a nation’s social, economic, and political landscape, it’s our endeavor to shed light on inflation rates, population growth, socio-economic transformations and more to offer a comprehensive look at Somalia. This post aims to provide an engaging exploration of various statistical overviews, painting a holistic picture of a country setting its sights on resurgence, despite challenges and constraints.

The Latest Somali Statistics Unveiled

Nearly 15% of the Somali population live in absolute poverty.

Highlighting that nearly 15% of the Somali population live in absolute poverty underscores the magnitude of socio-economic challenges prevailing in the country. In a blog post centered around Somali statistics, this figure serves as a stark reminder of the prevailing inequalities and the urgent necessity for economic reform. It showcases the state’s struggle with poverty alleviation and painted a grim picture of the living conditions for a significant portion of its citizens. This profound understanding of the national economic plight is essential to inform policy-making and humanitarian assistance, ultimately steering the conversation towards sustainable solutions that could change lives significantly for this percentage of Somalis.

The average life expectancy in Somalia is around 56.6 years.

Peering into the prism of Somali statistics, an arresting figure captures our attention- the average life expectancy in the country hovers around a mere 56.6 years. This figure not only acts as a north star guiding public health policies and initiatives, but also shines a stark light on the nation’s social and economic challenges. Its pertinence cannot be overstated – it alludes to the dire healthcare conditions, nutrition insufficiency, and the lingering ghosts of war-torn infrastructure. Painted by this compelling numeral tale, the life expectancy stat sketch adds vivid hues to the intricate canvas of Somalia’s current condition, serving as an essential brushstroke in a sophisticated statistical portrait.

Less than 40% of the Somali population have access to health services.

In the canvas of Somali Statistics painted vividly on this blog, the diverse data hues portray a compelling narrative. A distinctly sobering shade comes alive with the revelation that fewer than 40% of the Somali population have access to health services, a factual brushstroke that undeniably demands attention. Not only does it suggest the striking prevalence of health issues, but also shines a spotlight on the grim impediment to socio-economic progress due to lack of sound health infrastructure. Through these contrasting statistics, the roughly sketched outlines of national priorities, potential policy focal points and areas requiring constructive international intervention, gain sharper definition.

Approximately 73% of Somalia’s population is rural.

Highlighting that nearly three-quarters of Somalia’s populace resides in rural areas offers profound insight into the nation’s demography and socioeconomic landscape. It underscores the inherent obstacles in accessing quality healthcare, education, and other essential services, often lacking in rural areas of developing countries. This critical datum can guide policymakers and developmental organizations in formulating targeted strategies for the upliftment of the rural community and for the equitable distribution of resources. Therefore, the 73% statistic of Somalia’s rural residence is a powerful lens through which the nuances of Somalia’s structural challenges and corresponding solutions can be scrutinized more effectively.

As of 2021, the population of Somalia is estimated to be around 16 million.

Grasping the significant figure of approximately 16 million inhabitants in Somalia in 2021 offers a fundamental cornerstone for the wider discourse on Somali statistics. This singular numeric representation not only echoes the assertion of the country’s demographic strength, but it also paints a vivid picture of the possible scope and impact of policies, social phenomena, and economic trends. Within a blog post centered on Somali statistics, this datum becomes an anchor, enriching discussions from healthcare to education, from urban planning to workforce development, and enabling the readers to grasp the magnitude of the topics at hand comprehensively. It sharpens the understanding of the country’s diverse socio-economic implications, eventually transforming numbers into narratives.

About 50% of the Somali population is under the age of 15.

Unveiling a young nation’s demographic story, the striking figure tells us that about half of Somalia’s populace are aged 15 or under. This youth bulge, particularly noteworthy in a blog post about Somali statistics, opens up myriad social, economic, and political dimensions for discourse. The proliferation of such a young population sets the stage for a potent workforce in the near future, carrying immense potential for economic resurgence. Conversely, it also signifies the inevitable challenge of providing adequate education and job opportunities, a stressor that if not properly managed, could exacerbate instability in a country already grappling with pockets of unrest. Hence, understanding this demographic statistic is key to planning and formulating strategies for Somalia’s future development.

The literacy rate in Somalia is one of the lowest in the world at 37.8%.

Painting an undeniable portrait of educational challenge, the literacy rate in Somalia, at a meager 37.8%, stands as one of the lowest globally. This stark statistic, woven into the narrative of Somali statistics, serves as a critical beacon – chronically illuminating the urgent need for educational reforms, enhancement of infrastructure, and investment in literacy programs. Its relevance resonates beyond academic discourse, affecting economic growth, social mobility, and overall quality of life. Hence, the tumultuous tale of Somalia’s struggle with literacy epitomizes the wide-reaching implications of statistical realities on societal progression.

Only about 17% of people in Somalia have access to electricity.

Painting a vivid picture of Somalia’s development struggles, the figure stating that a mere 17% of Somali residents enjoy electricity access underscores urgent disparities in infrastructure and living standards. Within a blog post about Somali Statistics, this number can beacon a distinct story about the country’s socioeconomic challenges. It reflects massive potential for growth in energy accessibility and a substantial area for policy intervention, whilst highlighting the hardships endured by a staggering number of households bereft of this fundamental utility. In essence, it serves as a poignant indicator of the level of underdevelopment and regions ripe for aid, investment, and improvement endeavors.

Around 5.9 million people in Somalia need humanitarian aid.

In wrestling with the intricacies of Somali statistics, it’s vital to pierce through the veil of numbers and appreciate the profound human realities they represent. The astonishing figure of 5.9 million people requiring humanitarian aid isn’t just an abstract statistic; rather, it vividly underscores the magnitude of the challenges that are entrenched in Somali society. This point magnifies the urgency for global concern, empathy, and action, as well as the need for robust policy interventions to alleviate such sprawling scale of distress. Therefore, grappling with Somali statistics is not merely about numerical comprehension but also about grappling with the depths of human struggle and resilience these numbers signify.

The median age in Somalia is 18.4, one of the lowest median ages in the world.

Unfurling the significant details of Somali statistics, one numerical standout is the median age of the population, nailed down at a mere 18.4 years, making Somalia one of the countries with the lowest median ages globally. This data paints a youthful portrait of the Somali populace, likely indicating high fertility rates and a predominance of youthful vigor. However, this also spotlights a critical canvas of socio-economic challenges – from education to healthcare to job creation for the predominantly young population – all vital considerations for policy making and development planning.

Roughly 9 out of 10 Somalis are Sunni Muslims.

Delving into the data, the concentration of ‘Roughly 9 out of 10 Somalis being Sunni Muslims’ forms a vital piece of the demographic puzzle in Somali Statistics. Unraveling such a preponderance reverberates its profound implications on various spectrums – cultural trends, political dynamics, social norms, and even economic practices in Somalia. Indeed, it provides readers with an essential perspective to comprehend the country’s religious landscape, shaping perceptions, discerning issues, and understanding the very fabric of Somali society.

Fertility rate in Somalia is high with an average of 6.12 children born per woman.

Highlighting the fertility rate of Somalia, notably at an average of 6.12 children born per woman, takes on a profound significance in a discourse revolving around Somali Statistics. It paints a vivid picture of the demographic fabric and trends, serving as the linchpin in discussions on social, economic, and health issues. High fertility rates can strain resources, infrastructures, and institutions even as they prime a youth-driven economic growth. Understandably, resulting implications may range from challenges in education, healthcare provision, employment to larger socio-economic development of the country, thus adding a vital dimension when engaging with Somali statistics.

In 2019, Somalia’s gross domestic product (GDP) was an estimated $5.53 billion.

Unveiling the economic portrait of Somalia in 2019, the figure of $5.53 billion GDP stands as an insightful revelation. This pivotal piece of data forms the heart of Somali financial landscape, providing a wide-angle view of its overall market value within a specific time frame. It represents the value of all goods and services produced within the boundaries of Somalia that year. Thus, it becomes a key indicator of the nation’s economic health and performance, playing an integral role in shaping public policies, informing investment decisions, and igniting debates on economic growth strategies. Essentially, this numerical benchmark in the realm of Somali Statistics, serves as a compass directing towards a better understanding of the nation’s economic course and potential.

As of 2018, only 15% of the Somali population had access to clean drinking water.

Illuminating the stark reality of resource scarcity in Somalia, the statistic that a mere 15% of the population had access to clean drinking water in 2018 forms a profound narrative within a critical analysis of Somali statistics. It not only underscores the severe societal and health implications pertaining to water deprivation and hygiene but also underscores wider socio-economic disparities. This figure bolsters the urgent call to action for improved water accessibility, unveiling the harsh challenges the nation is faced with, therein shaping a roadmap for infrastructural development, humanitarian intervention, and potential avenues of policy advocacy.

About 51% of the population in Somalia is engaged in the labor force.

Highlighting that approximately 51% of the Somali population is participating in the labor force is a striking revelation underscoring the active economic engagement of its denizens. Within a Somali statistics-focused blog post, this figure offers readers a critical lens into Somalia’s social-economic dynamics. It exemplifies the extent to which the population contributes to national growth, having implications on the country’s productivity, economic sustainability, and socio-economic policies. This labor force statistic also invites deeper discussions about employment structure, income generation, gender disparities in work, and the impacts of environmental and socio-political factors on Somalia’s labor market.

In the UK, the Somali community is the largest refugee group, numbering around 100,000.

Diving into the depths of Somali Statistics, one cannot overlook the intriguing revelation about their prominent imprint in the UK. With a staggering count of approximately 100,000, Somalis confidently emerge as the UK’s largest refuge community. This insight, quite significantly, transmits the voice of a silent minority, effectively unveiling a vibrant cultural crossroad within the UK’s multicultural landscape. Alongside, it vividly showcases the ample potentialities within diversification, while additionally emphasizing the need for culturally responsive policies and support schemes. Indeed, this demographic fact can serve as a lighthouse guiding towards nuanced interpretations and fertile discussions in the realm of socio-economic assimilation and integration. So, peel back the layers this statistic offers, to discover the enriched interface of British-Somali synergy.

Conclusion

Somali statistics, while historically limited due to infrastructural challenges, have gradually begun to provide enlightening insights into the nation’s socio-economic landscape. These data points have shown potential in guiding both policy-making and development programs, providing crucial insights into population trends, health concerns, economic growth factors, and educational challenges. However, there is a pressing need to further strengthen and modernize data collection methodologies to ensure accurate representation and to enable fact-based decision-making. Thus, they are essential tools for advancing nationwide growth and stability in Somalia.

References

0. – https://www.reliefweb.int

1. – https://www.www.who.int

2. – https://www.borgenproject.org

3. – https://www.www.macrotrends.net

4. – https://www.worldpopulationreview.com

5. – https://www.www.statista.com

6. – https://www.www.un.org

7. – https://www.www.indexmundi.com

8. – https://www.www.migrationobservatory.ox.ac.uk

9. – https://www.www.pewforum.org

10. – https://www.tradingeconomics.com

11. – https://www.www.worldbank.org

12. – https://www.data.worldbank.org

13. – https://www.www.advance-africa.com

FAQs

What is the population of Somalia?

As of 2021, the estimated population of Somalia is about 16 million people.

What is the predominant religion in Somalia?

The predominant religion in Somalia is Islam, with Sunni Islam being the largest sect practiced by about 99% of the population.

What is the official language of Somalia?

The official language of Somalia is Somali, although Arabic, Italian, and English are also widely spoken.

What is the life expectancy in Somalia?

According to 2021 data, the average life expectancy in Somalia is approximately 57.4 years for men and 60.2 years for women.

What is the literacy rate in Somalia?

The literacy rate in Somalia is estimated to be around 37.8% for adults over 15 years of age, as of 2021.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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