GITNUX REPORT 2024

Critically Endangered Species: Highlights of Most Recently Discovered Animals

Discover the worlds newest and most endangered animal species, including the Popa langur and more.

Author: Jannik Lindner

First published: 7/17/2024

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The Popa langur is already classified as Critically Endangered

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The Tapanuli orangutan is classified as Critically Endangered

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The Vika rat is classified as Critically Endangered

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The Macaya breast-spot frog is already considered endangered

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The Salazar's pit viper was discovered in 2019 in India

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The Tapanuli orangutan was discovered in 2017

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The Skywalker hoolock gibbon was discovered in 2017

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The Psychedelic rock gecko was discovered in 2010 in Vietnam

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The Vika rat was discovered in 2017 in the Solomon Islands

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The Hoodwinker sunfish was discovered in 2017

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The Xenoturbella churro was discovered in 2016 in the Gulf of California

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The Macaya breast-spot frog was discovered in 2018 in Haiti

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The Atacama snailfish was discovered in 2018 in the Atacama Trench

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The Epimeria quasimodo was discovered in 2017 in Antarctic waters

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The Dermophis donaldtrumpi was discovered in 2018 in Panama

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The Popa langur was identified using faecal samples and museum specimens

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The Wallace's giant bee was rediscovered in 2019 after being thought extinct

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The Wallace's giant bee was last seen in 1981 before its rediscovery

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The Tapanuli orangutan is the first great ape species to be described since 1929

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The Psychedelic rock gecko was discovered during a survey of lizard diversity

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The Vika rat was known to locals for decades before scientific discovery

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The Hoodwinker sunfish was hiding in plain sight for centuries

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The Hoodwinker sunfish was identified through DNA testing

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The Atacama snailfish was discovered using deep-sea cameras

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The Epimeria quasimodo was discovered during a deep-sea expedition

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The Popa langur is found only in central Myanmar

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The Salazar's pit viper is found in Arunachal Pradesh, India

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The Wallace's giant bee is found only on three Indonesian islands

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The Tapanuli orangutan is found only in North Sumatra, Indonesia

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The Skywalker hoolock gibbon is found in southwest China

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The Psychedelic rock gecko is found only in Hon Khoai Island, Vietnam

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The Hoodwinker sunfish is found in temperate waters of the Southern Hemisphere

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The Xenoturbella churro lives at depths of 1,722 to 3,660 meters

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The Macaya breast-spot frog was discovered in a remote mountain area

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The Atacama snailfish lives at depths of up to 7,500 meters

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The Popa langur is named after the extinct volcano Mount Popa

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The Salazar's pit viper is named after a character from Harry Potter

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The Skywalker hoolock gibbon is named after a Star Wars character

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The Xenoturbella churro is named after its resemblance to a churro pastry

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The Epimeria quasimodo is named after the Hunchback of Notre Dame character

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The Dermophis donaldtrumpi is named after Donald Trump

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The Dermophis donaldtrumpi was named to raise awareness about climate change

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The Salazar's pit viper can grow up to 50 centimeters in length

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The Salazar's pit viper is venomous

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The Wallace's giant bee has a wingspan of 2.5 inches

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The Wallace's giant bee is four times larger than a European honeybee

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The Skywalker hoolock gibbon has distinct eyebrows and a beard

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The Psychedelic rock gecko has neon-colored stripes

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The Psychedelic rock gecko is active at night

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The Vika rat is four times larger than a typical rat

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The Vika rat lives in trees and can crack coconuts with its teeth

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The Hoodwinker sunfish can grow up to 2.5 meters long

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The Xenoturbella churro has no eyes, brain, or gut

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The Xenoturbella churro is about 10 centimeters long

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The Macaya breast-spot frog is smaller than a dime

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The Macaya breast-spot frog has distinctive markings on its breast

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The Atacama snailfish has no scales and translucent skin

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The Atacama snailfish can withstand pressures equal to 800 elephants standing on its head

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The Epimeria quasimodo is a type of crustacean

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The Epimeria quasimodo has a distinctively curved back

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The Dermophis donaldtrumpi is a type of caecilian, a limbless amphibian

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The Dermophis donaldtrumpi is blind and burrows underground

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The Popa langur, discovered in 2020, has a population of only 200-260 individuals

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The Tapanuli orangutan has a population of fewer than 800 individuals

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The Skywalker hoolock gibbon has a population of fewer than 200 individuals

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Summary

  • The Popa langur, discovered in 2020, has a population of only 200-260 individuals
  • The Popa langur is found only in central Myanmar
  • The Popa langur was identified using faecal samples and museum specimens
  • The Popa langur is named after the extinct volcano Mount Popa
  • The Popa langur is already classified as Critically Endangered
  • The Salazar's pit viper was discovered in 2019 in India
  • The Salazar's pit viper is named after a character from Harry Potter
  • The Salazar's pit viper can grow up to 50 centimeters in length
  • The Salazar's pit viper is found in Arunachal Pradesh, India
  • The Salazar's pit viper is venomous
  • The Wallace's giant bee was rediscovered in 2019 after being thought extinct
  • The Wallace's giant bee has a wingspan of 2.5 inches
  • The Wallace's giant bee is found only on three Indonesian islands
  • The Wallace's giant bee was last seen in 1981 before its rediscovery
  • The Wallace's giant bee is four times larger than a European honeybee

Hold onto your hats, folks, because the animal kingdom has some new members that are as intriguing as they are bizarre! From a snake named after a character in Harry Potter to a blind amphibian with a presidential moniker, our most recently discovered creatures are causing quite a stir in the scientific community. With populations dwindling and habitats under threat, lets take a closer look at these critters that are as fascinating as they are endangered.

Conservation Status

  • The Popa langur is already classified as Critically Endangered
  • The Tapanuli orangutan is classified as Critically Endangered
  • The Vika rat is classified as Critically Endangered
  • The Macaya breast-spot frog is already considered endangered

Interpretation

In the ever-diminishing circle of our planet's biodiversity, these newly discovered species could easily be mistaken for characters in a high-stakes survival reality show. The Popa langur, Tapanuli orangutan, Vika rat, and Macaya breast-spot frog have all been handed the dreaded "Critically Endangered" or "Endangered" labels, signaling a desperate need for conservation efforts. It's almost as if Mother Nature just switched her TV to a continuous loop of "Extreme Makeover: Conservation Edition." Let's hope these species can defy the odds and not end up being the next disappointing season finale.

Discovery Location

  • The Salazar's pit viper was discovered in 2019 in India
  • The Tapanuli orangutan was discovered in 2017
  • The Skywalker hoolock gibbon was discovered in 2017
  • The Psychedelic rock gecko was discovered in 2010 in Vietnam
  • The Vika rat was discovered in 2017 in the Solomon Islands
  • The Hoodwinker sunfish was discovered in 2017
  • The Xenoturbella churro was discovered in 2016 in the Gulf of California
  • The Macaya breast-spot frog was discovered in 2018 in Haiti
  • The Atacama snailfish was discovered in 2018 in the Atacama Trench
  • The Epimeria quasimodo was discovered in 2017 in Antarctic waters
  • The Dermophis donaldtrumpi was discovered in 2018 in Panama

Interpretation

In a world where reality often feels surreal, one might expect the newest creatures to be straight out of a sci-fi novel. From a "Psychedelic rock gecko" in Vietnam to a "Dermophis donaldtrumpi" in Panama, the latest additions to our animal kingdom sound like they belong in a fantastical menagerie. However, as we continue to explore and discover the diverse species that share our planet, it serves as a reminder of the intricate and wondrous biodiversity that exists beyond our imagination. Perhaps there is still room for a little magic and mystery in the scientific world after all.

Discovery Method

  • The Popa langur was identified using faecal samples and museum specimens
  • The Wallace's giant bee was rediscovered in 2019 after being thought extinct
  • The Wallace's giant bee was last seen in 1981 before its rediscovery
  • The Tapanuli orangutan is the first great ape species to be described since 1929
  • The Psychedelic rock gecko was discovered during a survey of lizard diversity
  • The Vika rat was known to locals for decades before scientific discovery
  • The Hoodwinker sunfish was hiding in plain sight for centuries
  • The Hoodwinker sunfish was identified through DNA testing
  • The Atacama snailfish was discovered using deep-sea cameras
  • The Epimeria quasimodo was discovered during a deep-sea expedition

Interpretation

In a world where species are constantly slipping through the cracks of human awareness, the recent flurry of new discoveries serves as a gentle reminder of just how much we still have left to uncover in the vast tapestry of life on Earth. From faecal samples to deep-sea cameras, from plain sight to hidden in plain sight, these revelations show us that even the most overlooked corners of our planet hold precious secrets waiting to be unveiled. So let us raise a toast to the Popa langur, the Wallace's giant bee, the Tapanuli orangutan, the Psychedelic rock gecko, the Vika rat, the Hoodwinker sunfish, the Atacama snailfish, and the Epimeria quasimodo - for they are not just new entries in our record books, but living, breathing testaments to the awe-inspiring diversity of life that surrounds us.

Habitat

  • The Popa langur is found only in central Myanmar
  • The Salazar's pit viper is found in Arunachal Pradesh, India
  • The Wallace's giant bee is found only on three Indonesian islands
  • The Tapanuli orangutan is found only in North Sumatra, Indonesia
  • The Skywalker hoolock gibbon is found in southwest China
  • The Psychedelic rock gecko is found only in Hon Khoai Island, Vietnam
  • The Hoodwinker sunfish is found in temperate waters of the Southern Hemisphere
  • The Xenoturbella churro lives at depths of 1,722 to 3,660 meters
  • The Macaya breast-spot frog was discovered in a remote mountain area
  • The Atacama snailfish lives at depths of up to 7,500 meters

Interpretation

In a world where new species are being discovered at a remarkable rate, it seems that Mother Nature still likes to keep us on our toes with her creativity. From the elusive Popa langur swinging through the forests of Myanmar to the enigmatic Xenoturbella churro chilling at incredible depths, each newly found creature is a reminder of the diversity and wonder of our planet. So, next time you think you've seen it all, remember that there's a Psychedelic rock gecko out there grooving on an island, a Hoodwinker sunfish cruising through the Southern Hemisphere waters like it owns the place, and a Macaya breast-spot frog striking a pose in its newfound mountain abode. Truly, nature is the greatest show on Earth, and we're just getting started!

Naming

  • The Popa langur is named after the extinct volcano Mount Popa
  • The Salazar's pit viper is named after a character from Harry Potter
  • The Skywalker hoolock gibbon is named after a Star Wars character
  • The Xenoturbella churro is named after its resemblance to a churro pastry
  • The Epimeria quasimodo is named after the Hunchback of Notre Dame character
  • The Dermophis donaldtrumpi is named after Donald Trump
  • The Dermophis donaldtrumpi was named to raise awareness about climate change

Interpretation

In a world where species are being named after extinct volcanoes, fantasy characters, and even controversial political figures, it seems like the animal kingdom is getting a crash course in pop culture and current events. The recent discovery of creatures like the Salazar's pit viper, Skywalker hoolock gibbon, and Dermophis donaldtrumpi has brought a new layer of intrigue to the scientific community. While some may raise an eyebrow at the naming choices, it is clear that these monikers are not just whimsical - they serve a deeper purpose in raising awareness about the pressing issues of our time, such as climate change. Perhaps next we'll see a species named after the latest trending meme or viral video. Welcome to the wild world of taxonomy, where truth is sometimes stranger than fiction.

Physical Characteristics

  • The Salazar's pit viper can grow up to 50 centimeters in length
  • The Salazar's pit viper is venomous
  • The Wallace's giant bee has a wingspan of 2.5 inches
  • The Wallace's giant bee is four times larger than a European honeybee
  • The Skywalker hoolock gibbon has distinct eyebrows and a beard
  • The Psychedelic rock gecko has neon-colored stripes
  • The Psychedelic rock gecko is active at night
  • The Vika rat is four times larger than a typical rat
  • The Vika rat lives in trees and can crack coconuts with its teeth
  • The Hoodwinker sunfish can grow up to 2.5 meters long
  • The Xenoturbella churro has no eyes, brain, or gut
  • The Xenoturbella churro is about 10 centimeters long
  • The Macaya breast-spot frog is smaller than a dime
  • The Macaya breast-spot frog has distinctive markings on its breast
  • The Atacama snailfish has no scales and translucent skin
  • The Atacama snailfish can withstand pressures equal to 800 elephants standing on its head
  • The Epimeria quasimodo is a type of crustacean
  • The Epimeria quasimodo has a distinctively curved back
  • The Dermophis donaldtrumpi is a type of caecilian, a limbless amphibian
  • The Dermophis donaldtrumpi is blind and burrows underground

Interpretation

In a world where the obscure and extraordinary meet, nature unveils its latest cast of characters - from venomous vipers with a penchant for length, to giant bees soaring above in the skies. The Skywalker hoolock gibbon cuts a dashing figure with its bearded brows, while the Psychedelic rock gecko paints the night neon with its vibrant stripes. Let's not forget the Vika rat, a coconut-cracking acrobat of the treetops, or the Hoodwinker sunfish, a gentle giant measuring up to 2.5 meters. Meanwhile, the Xenoturbella churro takes simplicity to a whole new level, eschewing the need for eyes, brains, or guts. From the diminutive Macaya breast-spot frog to the resilient Atacama snailfish with its elephant-defying strength, and the Epimeria quasimodo with its evocative back arch, nature's latest discoveries remind us that truth is often stranger - and more fantastical - than fiction, even giving us the intriguingly named, blind, subterranean dweller, the Dermophis donaldtrumpi. Cheers to the vast and wondrous realm of our animal kingdom, where the bizarre and the beautiful coexist in perfect harmony.

Population

  • The Popa langur, discovered in 2020, has a population of only 200-260 individuals
  • The Tapanuli orangutan has a population of fewer than 800 individuals
  • The Skywalker hoolock gibbon has a population of fewer than 200 individuals

Interpretation

In the ever-expanding galaxy of biodiversity, these newly unearthed creatures face a cosmic challenge as they navigate the precarious paths of existence. With populations dwindling faster than spacecraft fuel, the Popa langur, Tapanuli orangutan, and Skywalker hoolock gibbon are the elusive starlets of nature's grand show, captivating us with their rarity and vulnerability. As we witness these celestial beings teetering on the brink of extinction, it's a sobering reminder that our conservation efforts must soar higher than any Millennium Falcon to ensure their survival in this vast universe.

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