GITNUX REPORT 2024

Survey Reveals Most Popular Food in Japan Based on Consumption

Exploring Japans Culinary Landscape: From Sushi to Ramen, a Deep Dive into Popular Foods.

Author: Jannik Lindner

First published: 7/17/2024

Statistic 1

Tempura is enjoyed by 60% of Japanese people at least once a month

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Tonkatsu (breaded pork cutlet) is eaten by 40% of Japanese people at least twice a month

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Karaage (fried chicken) is consumed by 55% of Japanese people at least twice a month

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Shrimp tempura is the most popular type of tempura, accounting for 40% of tempura consumption

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Vegetable tempura accounts for 35% of tempura consumption in Japan

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Fish tempura accounts for 25% of tempura consumption in Japan

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Yakitori (grilled chicken skewers) is consumed by 50% of Japanese adults at least once a month

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Teriyaki dishes are consumed by 60% of Japanese people at least once a month

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Yakiniku (grilled meat) is enjoyed by 50% of Japanese people at least once a month

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Unagi (grilled eel) is consumed by 25% of Japanese people at least once a month

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Chicken is the most popular meat for yakitori, accounting for 70% of yakitori consumption

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Pork is the second most popular meat for yakitori, accounting for 20% of yakitori consumption

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Beef is the third most popular meat for yakitori, accounting for 10% of yakitori consumption

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Beef is the most popular meat for yakiniku, accounting for 50% of yakiniku consumption

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Pork is the second most popular meat for yakiniku, accounting for 30% of yakiniku consumption

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Chicken is the third most popular meat for yakiniku, accounting for 20% of yakiniku consumption

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Ramen is consumed by 80% of Japanese people at least once a week

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Udon noodles are consumed by 70% of Japanese people at least once a week

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Soba noodles are consumed by 65% of Japanese people at least once a week

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Yakisoba (fried noodles) is eaten by 50% of Japanese people at least once a month

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Tonkotsu ramen is the most popular ramen variety, consumed by 35% of ramen eaters

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Miso ramen is the second most popular ramen variety, consumed by 25% of ramen eaters

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Shoyu ramen is the third most popular ramen variety, consumed by 20% of ramen eaters

Statistic 24

Shio ramen is consumed by 15% of ramen eaters in Japan

Statistic 25

Onigiri (rice balls) are consumed by 90% of Japanese people as a quick snack or meal

Statistic 26

Curry rice is eaten by 80% of Japanese households at least once a month

Statistic 27

Donburi (rice bowl dishes) are eaten by 70% of Japanese people at least once a week

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Katsudon (pork cutlet rice bowl) is the most popular donburi dish, consumed by 30% of donburi eaters

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Gyudon (beef rice bowl) is the second most popular donburi dish, consumed by 25% of donburi eaters

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Oyakodon (chicken and egg rice bowl) is the third most popular donburi dish, consumed by 20% of donburi eaters

Statistic 31

Tendon (tempura rice bowl) is consumed by 15% of donburi eaters in Japan

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Unadon (eel rice bowl) is consumed by 10% of donburi eaters in Japan

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Pork curry is the most popular type of curry rice, consumed by 45% of curry rice eaters

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Chicken curry is the second most popular type of curry rice, consumed by 35% of curry rice eaters

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Beef curry is the third most popular type of curry rice, consumed by 20% of curry rice eaters

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Sushi accounts for approximately 20% of seafood consumption in Japan

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Sashimi accounts for 15% of seafood consumption in Japan

Statistic 38

Tuna is the most popular fish for sashimi, accounting for 30% of sashimi consumption

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Salmon is the second most popular fish for sashimi, accounting for 25% of sashimi consumption

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Yellowtail is the third most popular fish for sashimi, accounting for 15% of sashimi consumption

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Mackerel accounts for 10% of sashimi consumption in Japan

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Squid accounts for 8% of sashimi consumption in Japan

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Octopus accounts for 7% of sashimi consumption in Japan

Statistic 44

Nigiri sushi accounts for 60% of sushi consumption in Japan

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Maki sushi accounts for 25% of sushi consumption in Japan

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Temaki sushi accounts for 10% of sushi consumption in Japan

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Inari sushi accounts for 5% of sushi consumption in Japan

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Takoyaki (octopus balls) is consumed by 30% of Japanese people at least once a week

Statistic 49

Okonomiyaki (savory pancake) is enjoyed by 45% of Japanese people at least once a month

Statistic 50

Gyoza (dumplings) are consumed by 55% of Japanese people at least twice a month

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Osaka-style okonomiyaki is consumed by 60% of okonomiyaki eaters in Japan

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Hiroshima-style okonomiyaki is consumed by 30% of okonomiyaki eaters in Japan

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Other regional styles of okonomiyaki account for 10% of okonomiyaki consumption in Japan

Statistic 54

Pork gyoza is the most popular type of gyoza, accounting for 70% of gyoza consumption

Statistic 55

Vegetable gyoza accounts for 20% of gyoza consumption in Japan

Statistic 56

Shrimp gyoza accounts for 10% of gyoza consumption in Japan

Statistic 57

Miso soup is consumed by 75% of Japanese households daily

Statistic 58

Natto (fermented soybeans) is consumed by 40% of Japanese people at least once a week

Statistic 59

Sukiyaki (hot pot dish) is eaten by 35% of Japanese households at least once a month

Statistic 60

Shabu-shabu (hot pot dish) is enjoyed by 30% of Japanese people at least once a month

Statistic 61

Tamagoyaki (rolled omelette) is eaten by 60% of Japanese households at least once a week

Statistic 62

Nikujaga (meat and potato stew) is consumed by 40% of Japanese households at least twice a month

Statistic 63

Chawanmushi (savory egg custard) is enjoyed by 25% of Japanese people at least once a month

Statistic 64

Tsukemono (pickled vegetables) are consumed by 80% of Japanese households daily

Statistic 65

Oden (winter hot pot) is consumed by 40% of Japanese people during the winter months

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Summary

  • Sushi accounts for approximately 20% of seafood consumption in Japan
  • Ramen is consumed by 80% of Japanese people at least once a week
  • Miso soup is consumed by 75% of Japanese households daily
  • Tempura is enjoyed by 60% of Japanese people at least once a month
  • Udon noodles are consumed by 70% of Japanese people at least once a week
  • Yakitori (grilled chicken skewers) is consumed by 50% of Japanese adults at least once a month
  • Tonkatsu (breaded pork cutlet) is eaten by 40% of Japanese people at least twice a month
  • Soba noodles are consumed by 65% of Japanese people at least once a week
  • Onigiri (rice balls) are consumed by 90% of Japanese people as a quick snack or meal
  • Curry rice is eaten by 80% of Japanese households at least once a month
  • Takoyaki (octopus balls) is consumed by 30% of Japanese people at least once a week
  • Okonomiyaki (savory pancake) is enjoyed by 45% of Japanese people at least once a month
  • Gyoza (dumplings) are consumed by 55% of Japanese people at least twice a month
  • Sashimi accounts for 15% of seafood consumption in Japan
  • Teriyaki dishes are consumed by 60% of Japanese people at least once a month

Step right up, foodies! Ever wondered what fuels the culinary obsession in Japan that keeps its citizens forever salivating and slurping noodles with unparalleled zeal? With statistics like sushi dominating seafood consumption at 20%, ramen being a staple for 80% of the population weekly, and tempura tantalizing 60% of bellies monthly, its no wonder Japans cuisine is a force to be reckoned with. Satisfy your hunger for knowledge as we delve into the delicious details of the most popular food items in Japan, from miso soup to yakitori, tonkatsu to udon, and everything in between!

Fried Foods

  • Tempura is enjoyed by 60% of Japanese people at least once a month
  • Tonkatsu (breaded pork cutlet) is eaten by 40% of Japanese people at least twice a month
  • Karaage (fried chicken) is consumed by 55% of Japanese people at least twice a month
  • Shrimp tempura is the most popular type of tempura, accounting for 40% of tempura consumption
  • Vegetable tempura accounts for 35% of tempura consumption in Japan
  • Fish tempura accounts for 25% of tempura consumption in Japan

Interpretation

In a land where sophistication meets deep-fried indulgence, the battle of the tempura toppings rages on as shrimp emerges victorious, dominating 40% of Japanese tempura consumption. While tonkatsu continues to satisfy 40% of the population's craving for crispy comfort, karaage swoops in with a succulent 55% triumph, proving that when it comes to fried delights, chicken can do no wrong. As vegetable and fish tempura play a supporting role, one thing is clear—Japan's love affair with battered and fried goodness knows no bounds, making every bite a crispy, golden salute to culinary excellence.

Grilled Foods

  • Yakitori (grilled chicken skewers) is consumed by 50% of Japanese adults at least once a month
  • Teriyaki dishes are consumed by 60% of Japanese people at least once a month
  • Yakiniku (grilled meat) is enjoyed by 50% of Japanese people at least once a month
  • Unagi (grilled eel) is consumed by 25% of Japanese people at least once a month
  • Chicken is the most popular meat for yakitori, accounting for 70% of yakitori consumption
  • Pork is the second most popular meat for yakitori, accounting for 20% of yakitori consumption
  • Beef is the third most popular meat for yakitori, accounting for 10% of yakitori consumption
  • Beef is the most popular meat for yakiniku, accounting for 50% of yakiniku consumption
  • Pork is the second most popular meat for yakiniku, accounting for 30% of yakiniku consumption
  • Chicken is the third most popular meat for yakiniku, accounting for 20% of yakiniku consumption

Interpretation

In Japan, it seems the only thing hotter than the grill is the love for these sizzling meats. It's a skewer showdown where chicken reigns supreme, beef takes the yakiniku crown, and pork plays a versatile supporting role in both culinary spectacles. With statistics as fiery as these dishes, it's clear that the Japanese know how to turn up the heat when it comes to their grilled delicacies. So whether you're team yakitori, teriyaki, yakiniku, or unagi, one thing's for sure—these flavors are not to be grilled lightly.

Noodle Dishes

  • Ramen is consumed by 80% of Japanese people at least once a week
  • Udon noodles are consumed by 70% of Japanese people at least once a week
  • Soba noodles are consumed by 65% of Japanese people at least once a week
  • Yakisoba (fried noodles) is eaten by 50% of Japanese people at least once a month
  • Tonkotsu ramen is the most popular ramen variety, consumed by 35% of ramen eaters
  • Miso ramen is the second most popular ramen variety, consumed by 25% of ramen eaters
  • Shoyu ramen is the third most popular ramen variety, consumed by 20% of ramen eaters
  • Shio ramen is consumed by 15% of ramen eaters in Japan

Interpretation

In a nation where noodles reign supreme, Japan has turned slurping into an art form with their eclectic array of noodle dishes. From the comforting embrace of a steaming bowl of tonkotsu ramen to the subtle elegance of soba noodles, it seems that Japanese taste buds have developed a love affair with all things noodle-related. With statistics showing that ramen is practically a religion for 80% of the population, one can't help but wonder if Japan's secret to happiness lies in a savory broth and a tangle of perfectly cooked noodles. Bon appétit, Japan, and may your chopsticks never run dry!

Rice-based Dishes

  • Onigiri (rice balls) are consumed by 90% of Japanese people as a quick snack or meal
  • Curry rice is eaten by 80% of Japanese households at least once a month
  • Donburi (rice bowl dishes) are eaten by 70% of Japanese people at least once a week
  • Katsudon (pork cutlet rice bowl) is the most popular donburi dish, consumed by 30% of donburi eaters
  • Gyudon (beef rice bowl) is the second most popular donburi dish, consumed by 25% of donburi eaters
  • Oyakodon (chicken and egg rice bowl) is the third most popular donburi dish, consumed by 20% of donburi eaters
  • Tendon (tempura rice bowl) is consumed by 15% of donburi eaters in Japan
  • Unadon (eel rice bowl) is consumed by 10% of donburi eaters in Japan
  • Pork curry is the most popular type of curry rice, consumed by 45% of curry rice eaters
  • Chicken curry is the second most popular type of curry rice, consumed by 35% of curry rice eaters
  • Beef curry is the third most popular type of curry rice, consumed by 20% of curry rice eaters

Interpretation

In a country where food is a revered art form, it's no surprise that statistical analysis reveals an intricate dance of culinary preferences. From the humble onigiri to the sophisticated tempura-laden tendon, Japan's gastronomic landscape is a symphony of flavors and traditions. It seems that rice, in all its versatile forms, reigns supreme, with onigiri serving as the trusty sidekick to the plethora of donburi delights. Each dish tells a story of comfort and culture, a harmonious blend of simplicity and complexity that feeds the soul as much as the body. So next time you savor a steaming bowl of katsudon or indulge in a fragrant plate of curry rice, remember that you are tasting not just a meal, but a piece of Japan's culinary identity.

Seafood Consumption

  • Sushi accounts for approximately 20% of seafood consumption in Japan
  • Sashimi accounts for 15% of seafood consumption in Japan
  • Tuna is the most popular fish for sashimi, accounting for 30% of sashimi consumption
  • Salmon is the second most popular fish for sashimi, accounting for 25% of sashimi consumption
  • Yellowtail is the third most popular fish for sashimi, accounting for 15% of sashimi consumption
  • Mackerel accounts for 10% of sashimi consumption in Japan
  • Squid accounts for 8% of sashimi consumption in Japan
  • Octopus accounts for 7% of sashimi consumption in Japan
  • Nigiri sushi accounts for 60% of sushi consumption in Japan
  • Maki sushi accounts for 25% of sushi consumption in Japan
  • Temaki sushi accounts for 10% of sushi consumption in Japan
  • Inari sushi accounts for 5% of sushi consumption in Japan

Interpretation

In a land where the art of culinary craftsmanship meets the precision of mathematical proportions, the statistics on Japan's seafood consumption paint a vivid picture of the nation's palate preferences. From the elegant dance of nigiri sushi dominating the sushi scene to the flavorful symphony of tuna reigning as the prince of sashimi, Japan's dining landscape is a rich tapestry woven with delicate slices of salmon, yellowtail, mackerel, squid, and octopus. The numbers don't lie: in this ocean of gastronomic delights, each bite tells a story of tradition, innovation, and above all, a deep-seated love for seafood that swims from plate to heart.

Street Food

  • Takoyaki (octopus balls) is consumed by 30% of Japanese people at least once a week
  • Okonomiyaki (savory pancake) is enjoyed by 45% of Japanese people at least once a month
  • Gyoza (dumplings) are consumed by 55% of Japanese people at least twice a month
  • Osaka-style okonomiyaki is consumed by 60% of okonomiyaki eaters in Japan
  • Hiroshima-style okonomiyaki is consumed by 30% of okonomiyaki eaters in Japan
  • Other regional styles of okonomiyaki account for 10% of okonomiyaki consumption in Japan
  • Pork gyoza is the most popular type of gyoza, accounting for 70% of gyoza consumption
  • Vegetable gyoza accounts for 20% of gyoza consumption in Japan
  • Shrimp gyoza accounts for 10% of gyoza consumption in Japan

Interpretation

In a culinary landscape as diverse and flavorful as Japan's, each bite tells a story of tradition and innovation. From the tantalizing Takoyaki to the mouthwatering Gyoza, Japanese cuisine boasts a symphony of flavors that dance on the palate of its people. As the nation's appetite for these delectable dishes unfolds in delightful statistics, one thing is clear: the love for Okonomiyaki knows no bounds, with each regional style adding a unique twist to this savory pancake phenomenon. Whether you're team Osaka-style or swear by Hiroshima-style, the universal language of deliciousness unites us all, proving that food truly knows no borders. So, let's raise a gyoza to the culinary delights of Japan and savor every bite with gusto!

Traditional Dishes

  • Miso soup is consumed by 75% of Japanese households daily
  • Natto (fermented soybeans) is consumed by 40% of Japanese people at least once a week
  • Sukiyaki (hot pot dish) is eaten by 35% of Japanese households at least once a month
  • Shabu-shabu (hot pot dish) is enjoyed by 30% of Japanese people at least once a month
  • Tamagoyaki (rolled omelette) is eaten by 60% of Japanese households at least once a week
  • Nikujaga (meat and potato stew) is consumed by 40% of Japanese households at least twice a month
  • Chawanmushi (savory egg custard) is enjoyed by 25% of Japanese people at least once a month
  • Tsukemono (pickled vegetables) are consumed by 80% of Japanese households daily
  • Oden (winter hot pot) is consumed by 40% of Japanese people during the winter months

Interpretation

In a nation where culinary traditions are as rich as its history, Japan's diverse palate paints a portrait of a society that cherishes both heritage and innovation. From the ubiquitous miso soup that warms 75% of Japanese homes on a daily basis to the divisive natto that holds a pungent grip on 40% of the population weekly, the Japanese dining table is a theater of flavors and textures. While sukiyaki and shabu-shabu compete for the spotlight in the realm of hot pot dishes, tamagoyaki gracefully rolls into the hearts of 60% of households weekly. Nikujaga's comforting embrace and chawanmushi's delicate allure enchant taste buds across the nation, while tsukemono's crisp tang and oden's comforting warmth provide a culinary sanctuary in the rustic winter months. With each dish, Japan's culinary landscape is a canvas of tradition, innovation, and a love affair with food that transcends borders and time.

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