GITNUX REPORT 2024

Worlds Most Expensive Cuts of Beef Revealed in Price Breakdown

Discover the world of premium beef: from luxurious Kobe to rare Wagyu cuts at $500/pound.

Author: Jannik Lindner

First published: 7/17/2024

Statistic 1

Dry-aged beef can increase in price by 50-100% due to moisture loss

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Dry-aging beef for 30 days can result in 15-20% moisture loss

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A 50-day dry-aged steak can lose up to 30% of its original weight

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Dry-aging beef for 120 days can result in up to 35% weight loss

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Dry-aging beef for 45 days can increase its price by 75-100%

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Dry-aging beef for 60 days can result in 20-30% moisture loss

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Dry-aging beef for 90 days can increase its price by 100-150%

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Dry-aging beef for 120 days can result in up to 40% weight loss

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Tenderloin (filet mignon) typically costs $30-$100 per pound

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The New York Strip typically costs between $20-$30 per pound

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Ribeye steaks usually range from $12-$16 per pound

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A 42-ounce Tomahawk steak can cost up to $150 in high-end restaurants

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A 32-ounce Porterhouse steak can cost up to $100 in upscale steakhouses

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A 6-ounce filet mignon at high-end steakhouses can cost over $60

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A 32-ounce Tomahawk steak can take up to 45 minutes to cook properly

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A 24-ounce Porterhouse steak at a high-end steakhouse can cost over $100

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A 20-ounce bone-in ribeye can cost up to $65 at upscale steakhouses

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A 14-ounce New York Strip steak can cost over $50 at high-end restaurants

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A 40-ounce Tomahawk steak can cost up to $125 in upscale steakhouses

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An 18-ounce bone-in ribeye can cost over $70 at high-end steakhouses

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A 22-ounce T-bone steak can cost up to $80 at upscale restaurants

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A 16-ounce filet mignon can cost over $75 at high-end steakhouses

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A 28-ounce Porterhouse steak can cost up to $90 at upscale restaurants

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A 24-ounce bone-in ribeye can cost over $85 at high-end steakhouses

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The world's most expensive steak, a 2000 vintage cote de boeuf, sold for $3,200

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The most expensive steak at Nusr-Et Steakhouse in New York costs $1,100

Statistic 27

The world's most expensive burger, made with Wagyu beef, sold for $5,000

Statistic 28

The world's most expensive steak sandwich sold for $361 in London

Statistic 29

The world's most expensive beef bowl, using A5 Wagyu, sold for $2,615

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The world's most expensive Wagyu steak platter sold for $14,500 in Dubai

Statistic 31

The world's most expensive steak tartare, made with Wagyu, sold for $2,400

Statistic 32

The world's most expensive beef jerky, made from Wagyu, costs $500 per pound

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The average price of USDA Prime beef is around $50 per pound

Statistic 34

USDA Prime grade is given to less than 2% of all beef produced in the US

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The price difference between USDA Choice and USDA Prime can be 20-60%

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USDA Prime beef accounts for only 3% of all graded beef in the US

Statistic 37

The price of USDA Prime beef can be 25-50% higher than USDA Choice

Statistic 38

USDA Prime beef can cost 30-40% more than USDA Choice beef

Statistic 39

The price difference between USDA Select and USDA Prime can be 50-100%

Statistic 40

USDA Prime beef makes up less than 3% of all beef produced in the US

Statistic 41

The price of USDA Prime beef can be up to 60% higher than USDA Select

Statistic 42

Less than 0.5% of beef qualifies for the highest USDA Prime grade

Statistic 43

The price difference between USDA Choice and USDA Prime can be 30-70%

Statistic 44

Only about 2-3% of beef graded by the USDA qualifies as Prime

Statistic 45

The price of USDA Prime beef can be 40-80% higher than USDA Select

Statistic 46

A5 Wagyu ribeye can cost up to $200 per pound

Statistic 47

Kobe beef, a type of Wagyu, can sell for over $300 per pound

Statistic 48

Japanese A5 Wagyu Striploin can cost up to $250 per pound

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A 4-ounce cut of Japanese A5 Wagyu can cost $150 or more in restaurants

Statistic 50

Kobe beef production is limited to about 3,000 head of cattle per year

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Only 10% of Wagyu beef is exported from Japan

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The price of Wagyu beef can be 10 times higher than USDA Prime beef

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Wagyu cattle are often fed a diet that includes beer and sake

Statistic 54

The average Wagyu cow is worth $30,000, compared to $4,000 for a regular cow

Statistic 55

Olive Wagyu, the rarest beef in the world, can cost over $500 per pound

Statistic 56

The average Wagyu cow produces only 15-30 pounds of A5 grade beef

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Only about 0.1% of all cattle in Japan qualify as Kobe beef

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Wagyu cattle are often massaged to improve meat tenderness

Statistic 59

Matsusaka beef, another premium Wagyu, can cost over $500 per pound

Statistic 60

Some Wagyu cattle are fed beer to stimulate appetite in summer months

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Sanda beef, a rare Japanese Wagyu, can cost over $600 per pound

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Some Wagyu farmers play classical music to their cattle to reduce stress

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Hokkaido Snow Beef, a rare Japanese Wagyu, can cost over $400 per pound

Statistic 64

Some Wagyu farmers brush their cattle's coats daily to increase blood flow

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Summary

  • A5 Wagyu ribeye can cost up to $200 per pound
  • Kobe beef, a type of Wagyu, can sell for over $300 per pound
  • The world's most expensive steak, a 2000 vintage cote de boeuf, sold for $3,200
  • Tenderloin (filet mignon) typically costs $30-$100 per pound
  • Japanese A5 Wagyu Striploin can cost up to $250 per pound
  • The average price of USDA Prime beef is around $50 per pound
  • Dry-aged beef can increase in price by 50-100% due to moisture loss
  • A 4-ounce cut of Japanese A5 Wagyu can cost $150 or more in restaurants
  • The New York Strip typically costs between $20-$30 per pound
  • Ribeye steaks usually range from $12-$16 per pound
  • Kobe beef production is limited to about 3,000 head of cattle per year
  • Only 10% of Wagyu beef is exported from Japan
  • USDA Prime grade is given to less than 2% of all beef produced in the US
  • A 42-ounce Tomahawk steak can cost up to $150 in high-end restaurants
  • Dry-aging beef for 30 days can result in 15-20% moisture loss

Beefing up your knowledge on the worlds most expensive cuts is not just a rare experience, its a pricey one too! From A5 Wagyu ribeyes at $200 per pound to Kobe beef selling for over $300 per pound, the stakes in the meat game have never been higher. With a 2000 vintage cote de boeuf fetching $3,200 and the most expensive steak at Nusr-Et Steakhouse hitting $1,100, its clear that when it comes to beef, the cost can truly be rare!

Aging Process

  • Dry-aged beef can increase in price by 50-100% due to moisture loss
  • Dry-aging beef for 30 days can result in 15-20% moisture loss
  • A 50-day dry-aged steak can lose up to 30% of its original weight
  • Dry-aging beef for 120 days can result in up to 35% weight loss
  • Dry-aging beef for 45 days can increase its price by 75-100%
  • Dry-aging beef for 60 days can result in 20-30% moisture loss
  • Dry-aging beef for 90 days can increase its price by 100-150%
  • Dry-aging beef for 120 days can result in up to 40% weight loss

Interpretation

In the world of beef, dry-aging is like a fine wine - the longer you wait, the higher the price tag. With moisture loss driving up costs by 50-100% and weight shedding up to 40% after a 120-day dry-aging session, it's no wonder these cuts are considered the luxury VIPs of the steak world. So next time you sink your teeth into a perfectly aged piece of beef, remember that you're not just eating a meal, you're indulging in a high-stakes game of culinary sophistication.

Premium Cuts

  • Tenderloin (filet mignon) typically costs $30-$100 per pound
  • The New York Strip typically costs between $20-$30 per pound
  • Ribeye steaks usually range from $12-$16 per pound
  • A 42-ounce Tomahawk steak can cost up to $150 in high-end restaurants
  • A 32-ounce Porterhouse steak can cost up to $100 in upscale steakhouses
  • A 6-ounce filet mignon at high-end steakhouses can cost over $60
  • A 32-ounce Tomahawk steak can take up to 45 minutes to cook properly
  • A 24-ounce Porterhouse steak at a high-end steakhouse can cost over $100
  • A 20-ounce bone-in ribeye can cost up to $65 at upscale steakhouses
  • A 14-ounce New York Strip steak can cost over $50 at high-end restaurants
  • A 40-ounce Tomahawk steak can cost up to $125 in upscale steakhouses
  • An 18-ounce bone-in ribeye can cost over $70 at high-end steakhouses
  • A 22-ounce T-bone steak can cost up to $80 at upscale restaurants
  • A 16-ounce filet mignon can cost over $75 at high-end steakhouses
  • A 28-ounce Porterhouse steak can cost up to $90 at upscale restaurants
  • A 24-ounce bone-in ribeye can cost over $85 at high-end steakhouses

Interpretation

In a world where the price of a steak can rival that of a designer handbag, it seems that the most expensive cut of beef isn't just a dinner choice, it's a statement. Whether you opt for a delicate filet mignon or a hefty Tomahawk steak, the cost isn't just about the meat—it's about the experience. So next time you find yourself crunching the numbers of your dinner bill, remember: sometimes, a taste of luxury is worth every deliciously expensive bite.

Record-Breaking Cuts

  • The world's most expensive steak, a 2000 vintage cote de boeuf, sold for $3,200
  • The most expensive steak at Nusr-Et Steakhouse in New York costs $1,100
  • The world's most expensive burger, made with Wagyu beef, sold for $5,000
  • The world's most expensive steak sandwich sold for $361 in London
  • The world's most expensive beef bowl, using A5 Wagyu, sold for $2,615
  • The world's most expensive Wagyu steak platter sold for $14,500 in Dubai
  • The world's most expensive steak tartare, made with Wagyu, sold for $2,400
  • The world's most expensive beef jerky, made from Wagyu, costs $500 per pound

Interpretation

In a world where beef prices have reached astronomical levels, it seems like every succulent slice of Wagyu is worth its weight in gold. From lavish steaks to extravagant burgers, it's clear that for some, indulging in the finest cuts of meat is a luxurious experience reserved for the elite few. But as wallets weep with each bite, one can't help but wonder if these exorbitant prices are truly a reflection of unparalleled quality or just a reminder that in the realm of gastronomy, luxury knows no bounds.

USDA Grades

  • The average price of USDA Prime beef is around $50 per pound
  • USDA Prime grade is given to less than 2% of all beef produced in the US
  • The price difference between USDA Choice and USDA Prime can be 20-60%
  • USDA Prime beef accounts for only 3% of all graded beef in the US
  • The price of USDA Prime beef can be 25-50% higher than USDA Choice
  • USDA Prime beef can cost 30-40% more than USDA Choice beef
  • The price difference between USDA Select and USDA Prime can be 50-100%
  • USDA Prime beef makes up less than 3% of all beef produced in the US
  • The price of USDA Prime beef can be up to 60% higher than USDA Select
  • Less than 0.5% of beef qualifies for the highest USDA Prime grade
  • The price difference between USDA Choice and USDA Prime can be 30-70%
  • Only about 2-3% of beef graded by the USDA qualifies as Prime
  • The price of USDA Prime beef can be 40-80% higher than USDA Select

Interpretation

In the world of beef, USDA Prime is the haute couture of cuts, reserved for the elite few who can afford its luxurious price tag. With less than 2% of all beef in the US achieving this prestigious grade, it's no wonder that the average price hovers around $50 per pound, with some Prime cuts commanding a premium of up to 80% over their lesser counterparts. This exorbitant price point isn't just about the taste; it's a statement of indulgence and exclusivity, showcasing the pinnacle of beef perfection to those who can savor every succulent bite. So, if you want a taste of the high life, be prepared to pay top dollar for a piece of Prime paradise.

Wagyu Beef

  • A5 Wagyu ribeye can cost up to $200 per pound
  • Kobe beef, a type of Wagyu, can sell for over $300 per pound
  • Japanese A5 Wagyu Striploin can cost up to $250 per pound
  • A 4-ounce cut of Japanese A5 Wagyu can cost $150 or more in restaurants
  • Kobe beef production is limited to about 3,000 head of cattle per year
  • Only 10% of Wagyu beef is exported from Japan
  • The price of Wagyu beef can be 10 times higher than USDA Prime beef
  • Wagyu cattle are often fed a diet that includes beer and sake
  • The average Wagyu cow is worth $30,000, compared to $4,000 for a regular cow
  • Olive Wagyu, the rarest beef in the world, can cost over $500 per pound
  • The average Wagyu cow produces only 15-30 pounds of A5 grade beef
  • Only about 0.1% of all cattle in Japan qualify as Kobe beef
  • Wagyu cattle are often massaged to improve meat tenderness
  • Matsusaka beef, another premium Wagyu, can cost over $500 per pound
  • Some Wagyu cattle are fed beer to stimulate appetite in summer months
  • Sanda beef, a rare Japanese Wagyu, can cost over $600 per pound
  • Some Wagyu farmers play classical music to their cattle to reduce stress
  • Hokkaido Snow Beef, a rare Japanese Wagyu, can cost over $400 per pound
  • Some Wagyu farmers brush their cattle's coats daily to increase blood flow

Interpretation

In the world of beef, the prices can really make your wallet cry over spilled milk. From A5 Wagyu ribeye to Kobe beef, these premium cuts are priced higher than a Michelin-starred meal in a five-star restaurant. With a diet including beer and sake, massages, and even classical music serenades, these Wagyu cattle sure live a fancier life than most of us. With price tags reaching the thousands per pound, these cows are not just another steak on the grill – they are the true divas of the pasture. So, next time you take a bite of that expensive Wagyu, remember, you're not just eating beef, you're tasting luxury served on a silver platter.

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