GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Statistics About The Most Endangered Whale

The most endangered whale species, the North Atlantic right whale, currently has a population of less than 400 individuals and faces threats such as ship strikes and entanglement in fishing gear.

With sources from: nationalgeographic.com, oceana.org, biologicaldiversity.org, whalefacts.org and many more

Statistic 1

The western North Pacific gray whale population is estimated to be around 130-140.

Statistic 2

The North Pacific right whale counts to 40 individuals at best.

Statistic 3

There are fewer than 100 Arabian Sea Humpback Whales.

Statistic 4

Under 20 Spitsbergen whales exist today.

Statistic 5

Hunting reduced the Atlantic grey whale population to extinction by the 18th century.

Statistic 6

Before the 19th century, there were over 10,000 North Atlantic Right Whales.

Statistic 7

The worldwide population of blue whales is estimated at 10,000-25,000.

Statistic 8

Entanglement is the leading cause of death for right whales, killing at least 85 since 2010.

Statistic 9

Blue whales are the largest creatures that ever existed, but their population is only about 0.15% of the level it was before whaling.

Statistic 10

Over 30% of young beluga whales in Alaska don't survive their first year.

Statistic 11

Japanese whalers killed around 25,000 sei whales in 20 years.

Statistic 12

The Bryde's whale population has been reduced by an estimation of 50% globally.

Statistic 13

At least 10,000 to 25,000 baleen whales exist today.

Statistic 14

Humpback whale numbers have increased to over 80,000 from around 1,200 in the early 20th century.

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In this post, we highlight the alarming statistics surrounding some of the most endangered whale species across the globe. From the critically low populations of the North Pacific right whale and Arabian Sea Humpback whale to the devastating impact of historical hunting on the Atlantic grey whale, these numbers underscore the urgent need for conservation efforts to protect these majestic marine creatures.

Statistic 1

"The western North Pacific gray whale population is estimated to be around 130-140."

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Statistic 2

"The North Pacific right whale counts to 40 individuals at best."

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Statistic 3

"There are fewer than 100 Arabian Sea Humpback Whales."

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Statistic 4

"Under 20 Spitsbergen whales exist today."

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Statistic 5

"Hunting reduced the Atlantic grey whale population to extinction by the 18th century."

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Statistic 6

"Before the 19th century, there were over 10,000 North Atlantic Right Whales."

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Statistic 7

"The worldwide population of blue whales is estimated at 10,000-25,000."

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Statistic 8

"Entanglement is the leading cause of death for right whales, killing at least 85 since 2010."

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Statistic 9

"Blue whales are the largest creatures that ever existed, but their population is only about 0.15% of the level it was before whaling."

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Statistic 10

"Over 30% of young beluga whales in Alaska don't survive their first year."

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Statistic 11

"Japanese whalers killed around 25,000 sei whales in 20 years."

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Statistic 12

"The Bryde's whale population has been reduced by an estimation of 50% globally."

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Statistic 13

"At least 10,000 to 25,000 baleen whales exist today."

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Statistic 14

"Humpback whale numbers have increased to over 80,000 from around 1,200 in the early 20th century."

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Interpretation

In conclusion, the statistics paint a stark picture of the precarious situation facing many whale species across the globe. From the critically low populations of the Western North Pacific gray whale and North Pacific right whale to the devastating effects of historic hunting on species like the Atlantic grey whale and North Atlantic right whale, the decline in whale numbers is an urgent conservation concern. The challenges these magnificent creatures face, including entanglement and high mortality rates among young beluga whales, underscore the pressing need for concerted efforts to protect and preserve these iconic marine mammals before it is too late. While there are success stories, such as the significant increase in humpback whale numbers, the overall trend highlights the fragility of whale populations and the ongoing threats they face in their natural habitats.

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