GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Statistics About The Most Endangered Bird

The statistics about the most endangered bird indicate a rapid decline in population numbers, with only a few individuals remaining in the wild.

With sources from: abcbirds.org, doc.govt.nz, fws.gov, saving-spoon-billed-sandpiper.com and many more

Statistic 1

There are approximately less than 50 Maui Parrotbills left in the wild.

Statistic 2

The Pangani Longclaw population declined by about 77% between 2002 and 2011.

Statistic 3

The Ashy Storm-Petrel has a current population of only 5,000-10,000 birds.

Statistic 4

The California Condor was down to just 27 individuals in 1987.

Statistic 5

The World's most endangered bird is the Kakapo with a population of about 211.

Statistic 6

The Spoon-billed Sandpiper's global population is at critically low levels of approximately 250-500 pool.

Statistic 7

The Blue-eyed Ground Dove had not been seen for over 75 years until its rediscovery in 2015.

Statistic 8

The Imperial Amazon's population has declined to less than 50 birds due to habitat loss.

Statistic 9

The Ivory-billed Woodpecker has not had a confirmed sighting since the 1940s, it may be extinct.

Statistic 10

The number of Juan Fernandez Firecrowns is only about 500 pairs due to habitat loss and the introduction of non-native species.

Statistic 11

The population of Short-tailed Albatross is less than 1,000, mainly living on just two islands.

Statistic 12

The Saipan Moorhen is believed to be extinct with the last confirmed sighting in 1974.

Statistic 13

The Akikiki’s population has declined to under 500 birds due to habitat loss and non-native species.

Statistic 14

The Chatham Albatross’s global population is about 5,000 pairs and is found exclusively on a single island group.

Statistic 15

The total population of the Forest Owlet is less than 250 mature individuals.

Statistic 16

The Antioquia Brushfinch was only scientifically described in 2007, and only a few individuals have been observed since.

Statistic 17

The Hawaiian Crow, or ʻAlalā, is now extinct in the wild, with a few individuals remaining in captive breeding programs.

Statistic 18

The Iiwi has suffered a 92% population decline on Kauai since 2000.

Statistic 19

Stresemann’s Bristlefront has an estimated population of only 1-49 mature individuals.

Statistic 20

In the early 20th century, the New Zealand Fairy Tern had a population of 500 pairs, but may only have 10 breeding pairs now.

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In this post, we will shed light on the alarming statistics surrounding some of the world’s most endangered bird species. From the dwindling Maui Parrotbill population to the devastating decline of the California Condor, we will explore the critical status of various bird species and the threats they face in today’s rapidly changing environment.

Statistic 1

"There are approximately less than 50 Maui Parrotbills left in the wild."

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Statistic 2

"The Pangani Longclaw population declined by about 77% between 2002 and 2011."

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Statistic 3

"The Ashy Storm-Petrel has a current population of only 5,000-10,000 birds."

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Statistic 4

"The California Condor was down to just 27 individuals in 1987."

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Statistic 5

"The World's most endangered bird is the Kakapo with a population of about 211."

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Statistic 6

"The Spoon-billed Sandpiper's global population is at critically low levels of approximately 250-500 pool."

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Statistic 7

"The Blue-eyed Ground Dove had not been seen for over 75 years until its rediscovery in 2015."

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Statistic 8

"The Imperial Amazon's population has declined to less than 50 birds due to habitat loss."

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Statistic 9

"The Ivory-billed Woodpecker has not had a confirmed sighting since the 1940s, it may be extinct."

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Statistic 10

"The number of Juan Fernandez Firecrowns is only about 500 pairs due to habitat loss and the introduction of non-native species."

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Statistic 11

"The population of Short-tailed Albatross is less than 1,000, mainly living on just two islands."

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Statistic 12

"The Saipan Moorhen is believed to be extinct with the last confirmed sighting in 1974."

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Statistic 13

"The Akikiki’s population has declined to under 500 birds due to habitat loss and non-native species."

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Statistic 14

"The Chatham Albatross’s global population is about 5,000 pairs and is found exclusively on a single island group."

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Statistic 15

"The total population of the Forest Owlet is less than 250 mature individuals."

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Statistic 16

"The Antioquia Brushfinch was only scientifically described in 2007, and only a few individuals have been observed since."

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Statistic 17

"The Hawaiian Crow, or ʻAlalā, is now extinct in the wild, with a few individuals remaining in captive breeding programs."

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Statistic 18

"The Iiwi has suffered a 92% population decline on Kauai since 2000."

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Statistic 19

"Stresemann’s Bristlefront has an estimated population of only 1-49 mature individuals."

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Statistic 20

"In the early 20th century, the New Zealand Fairy Tern had a population of 500 pairs, but may only have 10 breeding pairs now."

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Interpretation

The statistics presented highlight the dire situations faced by numerous bird species around the world, with many on the brink of extinction or already lost. From the drastic declines in populations of iconic birds like the Maui Parrotbill and California Condor, to the alarming low numbers of species like the Spoon-billed Sandpiper and Iiwi, the data underscores the urgent need for conservation efforts to prevent further losses. The loss of these avian species would not only be a tragedy in terms of biodiversity but would also have far-reaching ecological consequences. It is imperative that immediate and effective actions be taken to protect and preserve these endangered birds before it is too late.

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