GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Measle Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Measle Statistics

  • In 2019, there were over 9.8 million measles cases and 207,500 deaths globally.
  • As of 2020, 85% of children worldwide received one dose of measles vaccine by their first birthday.
  • Approximately 119 million children missed out on measles vaccine globally in 2020, according to UNICEF.
  • In 2017, there were 110,000 measles deaths globally.
  • In the United States, there were 1,282 cases of measles in 2019 in 31 states.
  • In 2018, there were 349 confirmed measles cases in the U.S. in 26 states and the District of Columbia.
  • As of 2020, global measles vaccination coverage stagnated at 86%, well short of the 95% needed to prevent outbreaks.
  • In 2017, the World Health Organization reported 173,330 measles cases globally.
  • Severe measles is more likely among poorly nourished children, with up to 10% of cases resulting in death.
  • From 2000 to 2018, the measles vaccination prevented an estimated 23.2 million deaths.
  • Measles is one of the most highly contagious diseases known with a basic reproduction number (R0) of 12 to 18.
  • About 2 to 3 out of every 1,000 children who get measles will die from complications in the U.S.
  • Up to 40% of measles cases result in complications like pneumonia, especially in children under 5.
  • In 2015, 85% of children in the world received one dose of measles vaccine, up from 72% in 2000.
  • Worldwide, measles is the fifth highest cause of vaccine-preventable death among children.
  • In 2000, measles was declared eliminated in the U.S.
  • Ear infections occur in about 1 in 10 children with measles and can result in permanent hearing loss.
  • As many as 1 out of every 20 children with measles gets pneumonia, the most common cause of death from measles in young children.
  • 17% of measles cases in the U.S. in 2011 were among the adults aged 20 years or older.

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The alarming health crises we frequently encounter remind us how crucial data analysis and understanding is to mitigating and preventing disease. This blog post focuses on Measle Statistics, providing a comprehensive analysis of its historical and current prevalence, risk factors, and distribution. It is a thorough resource intended to shed light on the significance of reliable statistical data in public health planning and decision-making, using the specific case of measles as an example. Being an infectious disease, understanding the patterns and trends of measles through numbers can significantly aid in its control and prevention.

The Latest Measle Statistics Unveiled

In 2019, there were over 9.8 million measles cases and 207,500 deaths globally.

The striking number of over 9.8 million measles cases coupled with an overwhelming 207,500 deaths globally in 2019 paints a grave picture of the immense threat measles continues to pose worldwide. Such a statistic, crystallizing the vast extent of this treatable and preventable disease, creates an air of urgency in understanding and addressing its repercussions. Within the context of a blog about Measle Statistics, this data not only anchors the global perspective with precise numerical proof, but also underscores the critical need for concentrated efforts towards achieving a higher rate of vaccination and seamless healthcare systems, thus preventing this tremendous loss of human lives.

As of 2020, 85% of children worldwide received one dose of measles vaccine by their first birthday.

In the mesmerizing realm of measles statistics, the striking fact that, as of 2020, 85% of children worldwide had received a dose of measles vaccine by their first birthday, serves as a hopeful beacon. This numerical snapshot sheds radiant light on the promising progress in our ceaseless battle against this infectious disease. It underscores the global efforts to guard our future generation from the crippling clutches of measles leading to a significant reduction in mortality rates. Yet, it simultaneously serves as a stark reminder of the remaining 15% still at risk, motivating us to continue forging ahead until protective immunity wraps every newborn worldwide.

Approximately 119 million children missed out on measles vaccine globally in 2020, according to UNICEF.

Unveiling an unsettling scenario on a global scale, UNICEF reports that nearly 119 million children fell victim to the void in measles immunization coverage in 2020. This numeric revelation forms a crucial cornerstone in our understanding of measles statistics, offering a lens through which we can visualize the magnitude of the health challenge ahead. From this vantage point, we realize the scope of work that needs to be done to address public health vulnerabilities, immunization gaps, and associated health care disparities. By contemplating the sheer scale of children who missed their measles vaccine, we explore, not just the symptom, but the profound systemic issues in global healthcare that necessitate urgent rectifying interventions.

In 2017, there were 110,000 measles deaths globally.

The cited stark figure of 110,000 measles deaths globally in 2017 underscores the dire urgency and continuing relevance of addressing this preventable disease. It serves as a pulse check on the efficacy of global health strategies, illustrating an imperative for robust immunization campaigns, better healthcare infrastructure, and enhanced public awareness. Highlighted in the landscape of global measles statistics, this alarming datum throws into sharp relief the collective responsibility we bear towards curbing this measles-induced mortality, even in the 21st century.

In the United States, there were 1,282 cases of measles in 2019 in 31 states.

Highlighting the magnitude of the measles problem, an astounding figure that emerges is that in 2019, the United States recorded 1,282 measles cases across 31 states. In the grand narrative of measles statistical data, this number is not just another digit. It signifies a pressing health concern that has spanned a broad geographical range within the country. The prevalence of this infectious disease in numerous states underscores its potential for rapid spread, marking it as an issue warranting immediate public health attention and response. Therefore, it’s essential to track such figures to understand the extent of the problem, devise targeted prevention strategies, and gauge the effectiveness of implemented measures.

In 2018, there were 349 confirmed measles cases in the U.S. in 26 states and the District of Columbia.

This figure from 2018 serves as a potent reminder in our discussion about measeles statistics, highlighting the pervasive presence of measles even in developed nations like the United States. Pinpointing occurrences in 26 states and the District of Columbia, it underscores the breadth of the disease’s reach within a single year. This valuable statistic, woven into the larger narrative of measles’ resurgence, emphasizes the ongoing significance of disease vigilance, vaccination, and public health education to staunch its spread.

As of 2020, global measles vaccination coverage stagnated at 86%, well short of the 95% needed to prevent outbreaks.

In a landscape of ever-evolving health concerns, the statistic revealing that global measles vaccination coverage stood at a mere 86% in 2020 paints a disconcerting picture. Unable to meet the critical benchmark of 95%, the number becomes a clear indicator of the potential vulnerability of millions to this preventable disease. Despite significant advancements in healthcare, this shortfall underlines the persistent gaps in global health security, suggesting that barriers such as accessibility, vaccine confidence, and sociopolitical challenges continue to hinder progress towards a measles-free world. It brings to light the urgency of increasing efforts to ramp up measles immunization coverage, given its grave implications for public health, particularly against the backdrop of ongoing disease outbreaks.

In 2017, the World Health Organization reported 173,330 measles cases globally.

Wielding the spotlight on the staggering World Health Organization report, we unveil an alarming truth: globally, a whopping 173,330 measles cases were reported in 2017 alone. Diving beyond the mere numbers, this statistic serves as a stark reflection of the global health landscape, echoing a call-to-action for amplified immunization efforts. As we dissect measles statistics, unwrapping proportions of disease spread, this figure vividly underlines the gravity of a persisting measles crisis, thus catalyzing deeper conversation on immunization policies, public health infrastructure, and collective responsibility.

Severe measles is more likely among poorly nourished children, with up to 10% of cases resulting in death.

Highlighting the statistic that up to 10% of severe measles cases result in death among undernourished children serves as a striking wake-up call in the discussion about measles. In a blog post about measles statistics, it underscores the lethal intersection of malnutrition and infectious diseases, presenting a dire picture of health inequities. This measurable evidence creates a sense of urgency in addressing the dual dilemma of nourishment and vaccination, particularly in vulnerable populations. Hence, this hard-hitting stat becomes a linchpin, triggering comprehensive discourse and potentially inspiring resilience strategies to better safeguard and nourish our youngest populations.

From 2000 to 2018, the measles vaccination prevented an estimated 23.2 million deaths.

Anchoring our perspective on the significant strides achieved in public health, the figure proclaiming the prevention of a staggering 23.2 million deaths from 2000 to 2018, thanks to the measles vaccine, cannot be overstated. Adorned within a measles statistics post, this figure serves as a silent testimony to the impressive effectiveness of the vaccine, thereby unmasking the tremendous victory of science and humanity over diseases. It enables readers to visualize not just the lifesaving potential of the measles vaccine but also underscores the necessity of continued immunization efforts to safeguard lives against measles, which despite advancements, continues to be a lethal threat in many parts of the world.

Measles is one of the most highly contagious diseases known with a basic reproduction number (R0) of 12 to 18.

Diving into the intensity of measles transmission, the statistic of basic reproduction number (R0) standing between 12 to 18 serves to elucidate the extreme contagiousness of the disease. Within a blog post discussing Measle Statistics, this specific data point provides perspective on the rapidity with which the infection can proliferate within susceptible populations. Known as one of the most infectious diseases around, its R0 value, indicating the average number of people an infected individual can potentially spread the disease to, firmly underlines the gravity of its transmissibility. A thorough understanding of this statistic empowers both policymakers and public health leaders to galvanize appropriate preventive and control strategies, ultimately aiding in the reduction of measles worldwide.

About 2 to 3 out of every 1,000 children who get measles will die from complications in the U.S.

Highlighting the statistic ‘About 2 to 3 out of every 1,000 children who contract measles will die from complications in the U.S’ underscores the underbelly of a health concern that should not be taken lightly. It paints a vivid picture of the severity and potential fatality of measles, a disease often undermined due to its common occurrence. In a blog post about Measle Statistics, this chilling statistic serves to awaken urgency and the need for effective preventive measures. It indeed compels us to transcend mere numbers and connect with the reality of these cases – the tangible lives lost, and the preventable tragedies.

Up to 40% of measles cases result in complications like pneumonia, especially in children under 5.

In the realm of Measle Statistics, the glaring statistic of up to 40% of measles cases resulting in potentially serious complications such as pneumonia, particularly in children under 5, serves as a formidable beacon of awareness. It underscores the gravity of the disease, highlighting that measles is not merely a transient illness but one associated with threatening repercussions. Consequently, it punctuates the need for preventative measures, like vaccinations, to keep this perilous disease at a safe distance, especially where our vulnerable young population is concerned.

In 2015, 85% of children in the world received one dose of measles vaccine, up from 72% in 2000.

Such an upturn in vaccination percentages is of great significance, and offers a decisive stride in the worldwide battle against measles. This statistic highpoints the impressive progress made from 2000 to 2015 in advancing global health. It underscores the joint efforts of governments and organizations worldwide in implementing wide-ranging vaccination campaigns, an indispensable tool in curbing and possibly eradicating measles. Nonetheless, it also indirectly points to the remaining 15% of children who’ve missed their crucial first jab, thereby suggesting we still have distance to cover in securing protection for all children.

Worldwide, measles is the fifth highest cause of vaccine-preventable death among children.

In a blog post discussing Measle Statistics, the startling reality that measles ranks as the fifth highest cause of vaccine-preventable death among children worldwide thrusts a spotlight on the urgency of global immunization efforts. This somber statistic underscores the crucial role that measles vaccines play in child survival on a global scale, accentuating the dire consequences of vaccine hesitancy or unavailability. It serves as a compelling call to action, highlighting the critical importance of amplifying vaccine awareness, accessibility, and compliance to ensure our children are not enduringly shadowed by this preventable health threat.

In 2000, measles was declared eliminated in the U.S.

Highlighting the fact that measles was declared eliminated in the U.S. in 2000 serves as a crucial cornerstone within our conversation on measles statistics. It underscores the triumph of public health initiatives and vaccination programs over a disease that was once rampant and deadly. However, this landmark achievement isn’t just a victory badge, it beckons a deeper insight into the resurgence of measles cases in recent years, adding a layer of complexity to our current understanding. Thus, in understanding where we stand in fight against measles today, this historical juncture provides an essential context.

Ear infections occur in about 1 in 10 children with measles and can result in permanent hearing loss.

Amplifying the importance of measles statistics, the fact that approximately 10% of children affected with measles could develop ear infections leading to irreversible hearing loss, drives home the dire implications of this disease. Presenting stark evidence of measles’ real-world impact beyond usual symptoms, it hints at an under-discussed trajectory of complications. Therefore, it becomes not merely an informative figure but a crucial call to action emphasizing the necessity for preventive measures like vaccinations, thus enriching the depth of the measles-centric discourse in our blog post.

As many as 1 out of every 20 children with measles gets pneumonia, the most common cause of death from measles in young children.

Highlighting a statistic such as ‘1 out of every 20 children with measles developing pneumonia, the foremost cause of mortality in young children due to measles,’ brings into focus the gravity of the health complications associated with measles. In the sphere of measles statistics discussed in this blog post, this specific figure illustrates not just the potential of contracting the disease, but also the serious risks and potential life-threatening consequences it presents, in this case, particularly for young children. Emphasizing such a statistic serves to promote a serious discourse on the severity of measles and the urgent need for preventive measures.

17% of measles cases in the U.S. in 2011 were among the adults aged 20 years or older.

Unveiling a paradox within the realm of measles statistics, 17% of all U.S. cases in 2011 surfaced in adults aged 20 years or older, contrary to the common misconception that measles firmly sets its sights on childhood populations. This data cornerstone adds an eye-opening dimension to our conversation about the measles landscape, driving home the message that no age group is invincible when it comes to this contagious disease. Not only does it underscore the continued relevance of measles vaccinations across all life stages, but it also invites a more sophisticated dialogue around population immunity, disproportionately impacted demographics, and age-inclusive approaches to disease prevention.

Conclusion

In conclusion, understanding the statistics surrounding measles is crucial to highlighting the importance of consistent and widespread vaccinations. By examining these numbers, we emphasize not just the highly infectious nature of measles but also pinpoint the regions most at risk. Furthermore, the drastic decrease in cases after the introduction of vaccines only reinforces the decisive role of immunization in reducing measles cases. Analyzing measles statistics also helps in monitoring toward public health goals and informing future prevention and control methods.

References

0. – https://www.www.unicef.org

1. – https://www.www.who.int

2. – https://www.apps.who.int

3. – https://www.www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

4. – https://www.www.cdc.gov

FAQs

What are the common symptoms of measles?

Common symptoms of measles include high fever, cough, runny nose, red and watery eyes, and a rash of red spots that typically starts at the head and spreads to the rest of the body.

How is measles transmitted?

Measles is highly contagious and is transmitted through the air by respiratory droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes. It can also spread by direct contact with mucus or saliva.

Is there a vaccine for measles?

Yes, there is a safe and highly effective vaccine for measles. It's commonly known as MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine, and it also protects against mumps and rubella.

What are the complications that can arise from measles?

Possible complications include ear infections, diarrhea, pneumonia, encephalitis (swelling of the brain), and a rare but fatal disease called subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE).

Can you get measles if you have been vaccinated?

It is extremely rare but possible to get measles even if you have been vaccinated. However, typically, the disease is milder and less likely to lead to serious complications in vaccinated individuals.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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