GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Maternity Leave Job Retention Period Statistics

The statistics on maternity leave job retention period indicate that a significant number of women are able to return to work and retain their jobs after taking time off for maternity leave.

With sources from: eurofound.europa.eu, insee.fr, pewresearch.org, dst.dk and many more

Statistic 1

In the US, 66% of employees who take maternity leave return to their employer after leave.

Statistic 2

A UK study showed that 77% of women who took maternity leave were still employed in the same role three years later.

Statistic 3

In Canada, 92.9% of mothers who took maternity leave returned to work within a period of two years.

Statistic 4

In the US, only 58% of employees taking maternity leave are offered job-protected leave by their employers.

Statistic 5

According to Eurofound, only about 34% of women in Bulgaria returned to work after maternity leave.

Statistic 6

France has a strong maternity leave job retention rate with 97% of women returning to work in less than three years.

Statistic 7

81% of women no formal jobs in India quit after their maternity leave ends.

Statistic 8

Australian female employees who return to work after maternity leave face a 7% wage penalty.

Statistic 9

In the UK, 54% of women said their employer did a poor job providing support during maternity leave.

Statistic 10

40% of pregnant women in the U.S. do not qualify for maternity leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).

Statistic 11

25% of women in U.S. go back to work 10 days after childbirth.

Statistic 12

87% of Danish women return to work after having a baby.

Statistic 13

In South Korea, only around 53% of women go back to work after having a baby.

Statistic 14

In Italy, 78.3% of women likely to return to work within 2 years after giving birth.

Statistic 15

In the Netherlands, around 73% of women who gave birth returned to work within 2 years.

Statistic 16

In the U.S., 76% of working professionals believe companies that do not offer equal parental leave are discriminating by gender.

Statistic 17

In the United States, 6 out of 10 non-leave takers say they returned to work quickly because they couldn’t afford more time off.

Statistic 18

Less than half (43%) of U.S. employers offer paid maternity leave to their employees.

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In this post, we examine a range of statistics related to maternity leave job retention periods across different countries, shedding light on the varying experiences of women returning to work after childbirth. From high return rates in some countries to wage penalties and lack of support in others, these statistics offer valuable insights into the challenges and successes faced by working mothers worldwide.

Statistic 1

"In the US, 66% of employees who take maternity leave return to their employer after leave."

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Statistic 2

"A UK study showed that 77% of women who took maternity leave were still employed in the same role three years later."

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Statistic 3

"In Canada, 92.9% of mothers who took maternity leave returned to work within a period of two years."

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Statistic 4

"In the US, only 58% of employees taking maternity leave are offered job-protected leave by their employers."

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Statistic 5

"According to Eurofound, only about 34% of women in Bulgaria returned to work after maternity leave."

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Statistic 6

"France has a strong maternity leave job retention rate with 97% of women returning to work in less than three years."

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Statistic 7

"81% of women no formal jobs in India quit after their maternity leave ends."

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Statistic 8

"Australian female employees who return to work after maternity leave face a 7% wage penalty."

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Statistic 9

"In the UK, 54% of women said their employer did a poor job providing support during maternity leave."

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Statistic 10

"40% of pregnant women in the U.S. do not qualify for maternity leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)."

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Statistic 11

"25% of women in U.S. go back to work 10 days after childbirth."

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Statistic 12

"87% of Danish women return to work after having a baby."

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Statistic 13

"In South Korea, only around 53% of women go back to work after having a baby."

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Statistic 14

"In Italy, 78.3% of women likely to return to work within 2 years after giving birth."

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Statistic 15

"In the Netherlands, around 73% of women who gave birth returned to work within 2 years."

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Statistic 16

"In the U.S., 76% of working professionals believe companies that do not offer equal parental leave are discriminating by gender."

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Statistic 17

"In the United States, 6 out of 10 non-leave takers say they returned to work quickly because they couldn’t afford more time off."

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Statistic 18

"Less than half (43%) of U.S. employers offer paid maternity leave to their employees."

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Interpretation

Overall, the statistics on maternity leave and job retention paint a varied picture across different countries. While some nations like Canada and Denmark boast high rates of mothers returning to work after maternity leave, others like Bulgaria and India face challenges with lower retention rates. The discrepancy in employer support and available leave benefits is evident, with a significant percentage of women worldwide experiencing wage penalties, lack of job protection, and inadequate support during maternity leave. The data also highlights the financial constraints that many women face, leading to early returns to work in some cases. There is a clear need for more comprehensive policies and support systems to ensure that women have the opportunity to balance work and family responsibilities effectively.

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