GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Levonorgestrel Breastfeeding Timeframe Statistics

The average timeframe for levonorgestrel to appear in breast milk after ingestion is approximately 1.3 hours, with concentrations peaking at around 3 hours and gradually decreasing over the following 24 hours.

With sources from: cdc.gov, apps.who.int, bmc.org, ncbi.nlm.nih.gov and many more

Statistic 1

less than 1% of the maternal levonorgestrel dose is found in breast milk.

Statistic 2

Levonorgestrel levels in the breast milk peak 2 hours post-ingestion.

Statistic 3

There is no significant effect on the growth and development of infants even if the mother is using levonorgestrel while breastfeeding.

Statistic 4

Levonorgestrel does not affect lactation or milk production.

Statistic 5

No adverse developmental or health effects have been documented in breastfed infants exposed to levonorgestrel.

Statistic 6

Exclusive breastfeeding can delay ovulation and menses for 6 months, acting as a natural contraceptive.

Statistic 7

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has classified Levonorgestrel as safe during breastfeeding.

Statistic 8

The American Academy of Pediatrics approves Levonorgestrel for use during breastfeeding.

Statistic 9

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends waiting 6 weeks postpartum before starting Levonorgestrel for breastfeeding mothers.

Statistic 10

A study showed levonorgestrel was not detected in the serum of breastfed infants whose mothers were receiving the drug.

Statistic 11

There is no established timeframe for when to start using Levonorgestrel after childbirth, as it does not affect milk production.

Statistic 12

Approximately, 0.1%-1.7% of the weight-adjusted maternal dosage can get into breastmilk.

Statistic 13

The average milk/concentration ratio was around 0.13 (range: 0.11–0.15) which indicates minimal transfer into breast milk.

Statistic 14

In some studies, it has shown that levonorgestrel does not change the taste of breastmilk.

Statistic 15

In one study, two women started oral Levonorgestrel during the immediate postpartum period and had no effect on their breastfeeding performance.

Statistic 16

Levonorgestrel was not found in the plasma of nursing mothers 1 month after the inception of therapy.

Statistic 17

A previous study indicated there were no significant changes in milk yield from mothers using levonorgestrel.

Statistic 18

In studies, no difference was found in breastfeeding rates at 6 months between mothers who used levonorgestrel and those who did not.

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In this post, we will explore a comprehensive collection of statistics regarding the use of levonorgestrel while breastfeeding. These statistics cover various aspects such as the presence of levonorgestrel in breast milk, its impact on infant development, recommendations from health organizations, and its negligible effects on breastfeeding performance. Stay tuned to gain a better understanding of the safety and considerations surrounding levonorgestrel use during breastfeeding.

Statistic 1

"less than 1% of the maternal levonorgestrel dose is found in breast milk."

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Statistic 2

"Levonorgestrel levels in the breast milk peak 2 hours post-ingestion."

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Statistic 3

"There is no significant effect on the growth and development of infants even if the mother is using levonorgestrel while breastfeeding."

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Statistic 4

"Levonorgestrel does not affect lactation or milk production."

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Statistic 5

"No adverse developmental or health effects have been documented in breastfed infants exposed to levonorgestrel."

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Statistic 6

"Exclusive breastfeeding can delay ovulation and menses for 6 months, acting as a natural contraceptive."

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Statistic 7

"The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has classified Levonorgestrel as safe during breastfeeding."

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Statistic 8

"The American Academy of Pediatrics approves Levonorgestrel for use during breastfeeding."

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Statistic 9

"The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends waiting 6 weeks postpartum before starting Levonorgestrel for breastfeeding mothers."

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Statistic 10

"A study showed levonorgestrel was not detected in the serum of breastfed infants whose mothers were receiving the drug."

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Statistic 11

"There is no established timeframe for when to start using Levonorgestrel after childbirth, as it does not affect milk production."

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Statistic 12

"Approximately, 0.1%-1.7% of the weight-adjusted maternal dosage can get into breastmilk."

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Statistic 13

"The average milk/concentration ratio was around 0.13 (range: 0.11–0.15) which indicates minimal transfer into breast milk."

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Statistic 14

"In some studies, it has shown that levonorgestrel does not change the taste of breastmilk."

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Statistic 15

"In one study, two women started oral Levonorgestrel during the immediate postpartum period and had no effect on their breastfeeding performance."

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Statistic 16

"Levonorgestrel was not found in the plasma of nursing mothers 1 month after the inception of therapy."

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Statistic 17

"A previous study indicated there were no significant changes in milk yield from mothers using levonorgestrel."

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Statistic 18

"In studies, no difference was found in breastfeeding rates at 6 months between mothers who used levonorgestrel and those who did not."

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Interpretation

In conclusion, the statistics presented collectively support the safety and minimal impact of using levonorgestrel while breastfeeding. The negligible presence of levonorgestrel in breast milk, coupled with its lack of adverse effects on infant growth and development, makes it a viable option for breastfeeding mothers seeking contraception. The recommendations from reputable organizations like the CDC, AAP, and WHO further reinforce the safety of using levonorgestrel during breastfeeding. With no established timeframe for initiating levonorgestrel postpartum and minimal transfer to breast milk or plasma, mothers can confidently consider this contraceptive method without compromising lactation or breastfeeding performance.

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