GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Illegal Immigrant Employment Statistics [Fresh Research]

Highlights: The Most Important Illegal Immigrant Employment Statistics

  • In 2019, 67% of undocumented immigrants in the US were of Mexican or Central American origin.
  • 77% of Americans believe that undocumented immigrants mainly fill jobs that US citizens do not want.
  • An estimated 7 million undocumented immigrants are essential workers, with 5 million of them serving on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic response.
  • Most undocumented workers in the US in 2017 were employed in the agriculture, construction, and hospitality industries, suggesting that most of the undocumented workforce is unskilled.
  • In 2019, 67% of undocumented immigrants in the US were of Mexican or Central American origin.
  • The majority of unauthorized immigrants in the EU in 2017 were from the Asia-Pacific region (30%), followed by non-EU European countries (23%), Middle-East and North Africa (21%), and Sub-Saharan Africa (17%).
  • Undocumented foreign workers earn significantly lower wages than legal immigrants and native workers with similar skills, with a wage gap of 42% and 12% due to occupational barriers.
  • The adjusted wage penalty for undocumented workers had shrunk to about 2-4% by 2016, but still remains higher than legal immigrants due to lack of mobility and opportunities.
  • 77% of Americans believe that undocumented immigrants mainly fill jobs that US citizens do not want.
  • The public in the UK perceives ‘illegal immigration’ to be much higher than the actual statistic, leading to increased concern and support for campaigns to reduce illegal immigration, though the effectiveness of these campaigns is low.
  • Immigrant workers face higher rates of negative occupational exposures, leading to workplace injuries, fatalities, and poor health outcomes. This is especially concerning for undocumented workers, who are more vulnerable to human trafficking and exploitation.

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The issue of illegal immigration is a hot-button topic in the United States. While there is a lot of debate about how to address the issue, there is one fact that is indisputable: illegal immigrants are a part of the U.S. workforce. In this article, we will take a look at the statistics surrounding illegal immigrant jobs in the United States.

We will explore the industries in which they are most likely to be employed, the wages they are paid, and the impact they have on the U.S. economy. By the end of this post, you will have a better understanding of the role illegal immigrants play in the U.S. labor market.

Illegal Immigrant Employment: Important Statistics

In 2019, 67% of undocumented immigrants in the US were of Mexican or Central American origin.
The majority of unauthorized immigrants in the EU in 2017 were from the Asia-Pacific region (30%), followed by non-EU European countries (23%), Middle-East and North Africa (21%), and Sub-Saharan Africa (17%).
77% of Americans believe that undocumented immigrants mainly fill jobs that US citizens do not want.

Illegal Immigrant Employment: Statistics Overview

An estimated 7 million undocumented immigrants are essential workers, with 5 million of them serving on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic response.

This highlights the significant role that undocumented immigrants play in the US workforce. Despite their status, they are essential to the US’ recovery, with many of them working on the front lines of the pandemic.

This statistic also demonstrates the need for immigration reform, as it shows that undocumented immigrants are a valuable part of the US economy.

Most undocumented workers in the US in 2017 were employed in the agriculture, construction, and hospitality industries, suggesting that most of the undocumented workforce is unskilled.

This matters because it highlights the need for more job opportunities for undocumented immigrants that require higher levels of skill and education.

In 2019, 67% of undocumented immigrants in the US were of Mexican or Central American origin.

This provides insight into the demographics of the population of undocumented immigrants in the US, which can be used to inform policies and programs related to employment opportunities for this population.

The majority of unauthorized immigrants in the EU in 2017 were from the Asia-Pacific region (30%), followed by non-EU European countries (23%), Middle-East and North Africa (21%), and Sub-Saharan Africa (17%).

It provides insight into the origin countries of illegal immigrants and the potential job opportunities they may have access to in different countries.

Undocumented foreign workers earn significantly lower wages than legal immigrants and native workers with similar skills, with a wage gap of 42% and 12% due to occupational barriers.

Undocumented foreign workers are not being paid the same as other workers, which can create an unfair advantage for employers who hire undocumented workers.

The adjusted wage penalty for undocumented workers had shrunk to about 2-4% by 2016, but still remains higher than legal immigrants due to lack of mobility and opportunities.

This matters in the context of illegal immigrant job statistics because it highlights the ongoing wage gap between legal and undocumented immigrants, and the need for further policy changes to ensure fair wages for all.

77% of Americans believe that undocumented immigrants mainly fill jobs that US citizens do not want.

The majority of Americans believe that undocumented immigrants are not taking away jobs from US citizens.

The public in the UK perceives ‘illegal immigration’ to be much higher than the actual statistic, leading to increased concern and support for campaigns to reduce illegal immigration, though the effectiveness of these campaigns is low.

Public opinion is likely to be against illegal immigrants, and thus employers may be less likely to hire them.

Immigrant workers face higher rates of negative occupational exposures, leading to workplace injuries, fatalities, and poor health outcomes. This is especially concerning for undocumented workers, who are more vulnerable to human trafficking and exploitation.

This matters in the context of illegal immigrant job statistics because it highlights the need for better protections and regulations for immigrant workers, who are more likely to be exposed to hazardous working conditions and exploitation due to their lack of legal status.

Undocumented immigrants are more likely to experience dangerous working conditions, 300 more workplace fatalities and 61,000 more workplace injuries annually than native-born workers, and are often left without the basic rights of breaks, food and water, as well as earning substandard wages and experiencing wage theft.

This highlights the exploitation of undocumented immigrants in the workplace, which is enabled by federal laws like the Immigration Reform and Control Act. This exploitation is further exacerbated by employers taking advantage of the fear of immigration enforcement to create an atmosphere of coercion and exploitation.

This statistic demonstrates the need for better protection of undocumented immigrants in the workplace, as well as better enforcement of labor laws to ensure that all workers are treated fairly and equally.

Conclusion

In conclusion, illegal immigrant job statistics are a complex issue that is not easily resolved. The data available is often conflicting and difficult to interpret, making it difficult to draw any definitive conclusions.

However, it is clear that illegal immigrants are an important part of the U.S. labor force, and that their contributions should be recognized and respected. It is also clear that the current immigration system is broken and needs to be reformed in order to ensure that all workers are treated fairly and that the labor market remains competitive.

References

1 – https://www.americanprogress.org/press/release-millions-undocumented-immigrants-essential-americas-recovery-new-report-shows/#:~:text=7%20percent%20of%20workers%20in%20production%20occupations%20are%20undocumented.,construction%20laborers%20are%20undocumented%20immigrants.

2 – https://www.statista.com/statistics/652960/employed-undocumented-immigrants-in-the-us-by-industry/

3 – https://www.migrationpolicy.org/data/unauthorized-immigrant-population/state/US

4 – https://www.pewresearch.org/global/2019/11/13/the-origins-time-in-country-and-demographics-of-unauthorized-immigrants-in-europe/

5 – https://econofact.org/what-explains-the-wages-of-undocumented-workers

6 – https://scholar.harvard.edu/files/gborjas/files/labourecon2020.pdf

7 – https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2020/06/10/a-majority-of-americans-say-immigrants-mostly-fill-jobs-u-s-citizens-do-not-want/

8 – https://www.ipsos.com/sites/default/files/publication/1970-01/sri-perceptions-and-reality-immigration-report-2013.pdf

9 – https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-publhealth-040617-013714

10 – https://crownschool.uchicago.edu/student-life/advocates-forum/workplace-discrimination-and-undocumented-first-generation-latinx#:~:text=Research%20shows%20that%20immigrant%20workers,immigrants%20(Lee%2C%202018).

FAQs

What jobs are illegal immigrants allowed to have?

Illegal immigrants are allowed to have jobs that do not require proof of legal status.

Are illegal immigrants entitled to the same rights as citizens?

No, illegal immigrants are not entitled to the same rights as citizens.

Are illegal immigrants eligible for unemployment benefits?

No, illegal immigrants are not eligible for unemployment benefits.

Do illegal immigrants pay taxes?

Yes, illegal immigrants are required to pay taxes.

Can illegal immigrants receive healthcare benefits?

No, illegal immigrants are not eligible for healthcare benefits.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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