GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Gemstones Rarity Level Statistics

Gemstones are typically classified into four rarity levels – common, uncommon, rare, and unique – with the majority falling into the common or uncommon categories.

With sources from: gia.edu, jewelry.yournextshoes.com, nationalgeographic.com, si.edu and many more

Statistic 1

Diamonds, one of the most well-known gemstones, make up a mere 0.02% of the Earth's crust.

Statistic 2

Blue garnet is one of the rarest of gemstones, discovered in the late 1990s in Madagascar. Only a few pieces exist today.

Statistic 3

Painite was once considered the rarest mineral in the world with only two known crystals to exist in 2004.

Statistic 4

Red Beryl, also known as bixbite, is said to be 1,000 times more rare than diamond.

Statistic 5

Three times rarer than diamonds, Jadeite is considered the rarest gemstone in the world.

Statistic 6

Grandidierite is among the rarest gemstones in the world; a clean, faceted specimen may command up to $20,000 per carat.

Statistic 7

Alexandrite, with its quality of changing colors, is rarer than even diamonds and only was discovered in 1830.

Statistic 8

Taaffeite is so rare that it’s considered a million times rarer than a diamond.

Statistic 9

Musgravite, discovered in 1967, is considered one of the rarest gemstones in the world with just over a dozen documented specimens.

Statistic 10

There are only 10 specimens of the Fukang meteorite pallasite, which is unique for its embedded olivine crystals, known to exist.

Statistic 11

Black opal is more rare than diamonds and can fetch prices up to $15,000 per carat.

Statistic 12

Ruby prices can range from $100 per carat to $15,000 per carat, depending on its rarity and quality.

Statistic 13

Sapphire, the third hardest mineral, exists in every color except for red and is rarer than diamonds.

Statistic 14

The Hope Diamond, one of the most famous gemstones, has a history dating back almost four centuries; its rarity and value are still not accurately determined.

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In this post, we explore the rarity levels of various gemstones, shedding light on some of the most elusive and valuable minerals found on Earth. From diamonds to blue garnets, each gem possesses its own unique story of scarcity and fascination. Let’s dive into the world of rare gemstones and uncover the statistics that highlight their exceptional rarity and value.

Statistic 1

"Diamonds, one of the most well-known gemstones, make up a mere 0.02% of the Earth's crust."

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Statistic 2

"Blue garnet is one of the rarest of gemstones, discovered in the late 1990s in Madagascar. Only a few pieces exist today."

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Statistic 3

"Painite was once considered the rarest mineral in the world with only two known crystals to exist in 2004."

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Statistic 4

"Red Beryl, also known as bixbite, is said to be 1,000 times more rare than diamond."

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Statistic 5

"Three times rarer than diamonds, Jadeite is considered the rarest gemstone in the world."

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Statistic 6

"Grandidierite is among the rarest gemstones in the world; a clean, faceted specimen may command up to $20,000 per carat."

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Statistic 7

"Alexandrite, with its quality of changing colors, is rarer than even diamonds and only was discovered in 1830."

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Statistic 8

"Taaffeite is so rare that it’s considered a million times rarer than a diamond."

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Statistic 9

"Musgravite, discovered in 1967, is considered one of the rarest gemstones in the world with just over a dozen documented specimens."

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Statistic 10

"There are only 10 specimens of the Fukang meteorite pallasite, which is unique for its embedded olivine crystals, known to exist."

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Statistic 11

"Black opal is more rare than diamonds and can fetch prices up to $15,000 per carat."

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Statistic 12

"Ruby prices can range from $100 per carat to $15,000 per carat, depending on its rarity and quality."

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Statistic 13

"Sapphire, the third hardest mineral, exists in every color except for red and is rarer than diamonds."

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Statistic 14

"The Hope Diamond, one of the most famous gemstones, has a history dating back almost four centuries; its rarity and value are still not accurately determined."

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Interpretation

In conclusion, the world of gemstones is a fascinating realm where rarity plays a crucial role in determining their value and desirability. From diamonds, which are relatively scarce despite their fame, to ultra-rare finds like blue garnets, painite, and red beryl, each gemstone holds its own unique position in terms of scarcity and value. Gems like jadeite, grandidierite, taaffeite, musgravite, and black opal stand out as truly exceptional rarities, commanding high prices due to their extreme scarcity. The discovery and appreciation of these rare gemstones add a layer of mystery and allure to the world of jewelry and gem collecting, making them highly sought after by enthusiasts and collectors worldwide.

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