GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Female Suicide Bombers Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Female Suicide Bombers Statistics

  • Approximately 30% of suicide bombers in worldwide terrorist attacks between 1985 and 2008 were female.
  • About 15% of suicide bombers in Lebanon from 1985 to 2006 were women.
  • A study found 54% of female suicide bombers in Nigeria (2014 - 2017) were younger than 18.
  • From 2007 to 2015, about 11% of suicide bombers used by al-Qaeda were women.
  • As of 2015, over 350 known cases of female suicide bombers have been reported globally since 1985.
  • In Pakistan, between 2007 and 2012, less than 5% of suicide attacks were by females.

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The incidence of female suicide bombers has risen dramatically over recent decades, raising new questions about the dynamics of terrorism throughout the globe. This phenomenon raises queries about the motivations, psychological profiles, recruitment processes, and the roles of women in various radical organizations. In order to understand and mitigate the threat posed by these female suicide bombers, we must delve into the statistics surrounding this alarming trend. This blog post aims to shed light on these statistics, making it easier for researchers, policymakers, and the general public to comprehend the scope and urgency of this issue.

The Latest Female Suicide Bombers Statistics Unveiled

Approximately 30% of suicide bombers in worldwide terrorist attacks between 1985 and 2008 were female.

In the context of discussing Female Suicide Bombers Statistics, it’s intriguing to decipher that approximately 30% of suicide bombers in worldwide terrorist attacks between 1985 and 2008 were female. This figure embodies a significant and unexpected aspect of gender dynamics in terrorist activities, shifting traditional views mostly associating such violent acts with males. Considering this data intensifies our understanding of the interplay between radicalism and gender and how women are recruited and manipulated in the intricate web of terrorism. In this way, it offers a broader perspective, accentuating the importance of gender-specific counter-terrorism strategies.

About 15% of suicide bombers in Lebanon from 1985 to 2006 were women.

In examining the blog post on Female Suicide Bombers Statistics, the data illustrating that approximately 15% of suicide bombers in Lebanon from 1985 to 2006 were women, demonstrates the shifting paradigm within this macabre field of study. Highlighting this noteworthy proportion not only reveals the participation of women in such drastic instances but also invites us to delve deeper into the possible sociocultural factors propelling their involvement. Furthermore, it challenges the stereotypical gender profile of violent extremists, underscoring the necessity for a more nuanced understanding of women’s roles in such acts and thus, to devise more effective counter-terrorism strategies.

A study found 54% of female suicide bombers in Nigeria (2014 – 2017) were younger than 18.

The poignant statistic, denoting that 54% of female suicide bombers in Nigeria (2014 – 2017) were younger than 18, manifestly quantifies the horrifying reality of Nigeria’s terrorist activities through the lens of gender, age, and coercion. This numeric revelation, within a discussion around Female Suicide Bombers’ Statistics, serves as a sobering reminder: not only of the escalating trend of deploying female suicide bombers, but also the exploitation of young girls, entrapped in this terror matrix. It compels the reader to delve deeper into factors such as recruitment process, societal constraints, manipulation tactics, or any psychological warfare that could turn these innocent lives into tools of destruction.

From 2007 to 2015, about 11% of suicide bombers used by al-Qaeda were women.

Highlighting the data that from 2007 to 2015, approximately 11% of suicide bombers utilized by al-Qaeda were women provides an unexpected lens into the disturbing utilization of women in acts of terror. This figure challenges widespread perceptions regarding the roles women play in violent extremist groups and underscores the necessity for more targeted, gender-specific counter-terrorism measures. The use of such figures in a blog post about Female Suicide Bombers Statistics enables a comprehensive understanding of the complexity and nuance in a world where violence is not solely monopolized by men. It expands the dialogue and provides an essential, though often ignored, perspective in the discourse on terrorism and political violence.

As of 2015, over 350 known cases of female suicide bombers have been reported globally since 1985.

In a blog post discussing the statistics of female suicide bombers, the finding that more than 350 cases have been noted worldwide since 1985 paints a profound portrait of the vast, albeit often unspoken, involvement of women in such acts. This figure not only sets the stage for understanding the historical and current involvement of women in acts of political violence and terrorism, but also underscores the necessity for further research and discussion on the myriad forces driving women to this destructive path. In essence, this stark statistic acts as a chilling reminder of the gender-neutral face of terrorism, a reminder that dismantles stereotypical notions and triggers a call to action for more comprehensive counter-terrorism strategies.

In Pakistan, between 2007 and 2012, less than 5% of suicide attacks were by females.

In a blog post exploring the dynamics of female suicide bombers, the statistic that less than 5% of suicide attacks in Pakistan from 2007-2012 were perpetrated by women offers a crucial piece of data. This information provides a lens into the infrequency of female involvement in such acts, challenging perceptions about the gender roles in violent extremism. It forces us to question the stereotypes, societal norms and recruitment strategies employed in this region, making for a more nuanced understanding of the complex landscape of terrorism. Furthermore, it casts a light on the gender-specific impacts and experiences within violence and conflict often overlooked, setting the stage for further investigation and conversation.

Conclusion

The phenomenon of female suicide bombers, though less common than its male counterpart, is a significant issue warranting attention. Statistical analysis reveals they are tactically utilized by terrorist organizations due to societal stereotypes that tend to overlook and underestimate women as a potential security threat. Knowing this, it becomes essential to adapt our counter-terrorism strategies and incorporate gender-focused prevention efforts. This can be done by understanding the unique trajectories and motivations that drive women towards these violent acts, hence paving the way for more targeted and efficacious interventions.

References

0. – https://www.journals.openedition.org

1. – https://www.warontherocks.com

2. – https://www.www.cfr.org

3. – https://www.www.usip.org

4. – https://www.www.cambridge.org

5. – https://www.www.humanitarianresponse.info

FAQs

What percentage of suicide attacks globally are committed by females?

While specific percentages fluctuate annually, data suggests that approximately 15% of all suicide attacks globally are carried out by females.

What is the most common motivation behind female suicide bombers according to reports?

Research indicates that female suicide bombers are often driven by a complex interplay of factors including political oppression, personal revenge for loss of family members, societal pressures, and ideological or religious extremism.

Have there historically been any specific regions where the use of female suicide bombers is more prevalent?

Female suicide bombers have been particularly prevalent in conflict regions such as the Middle East, Africa, and South Asia. However, it's important to note that this phenomenon isn't confined solely to these regions.

Has there been an observable increase or decrease in female suicide bombings over the years?

Trends vary based on region and time period. For example, there was an observable increase in the use of female suicide bombers in Iraq between 2003 and 2010, but recent years have seen a decline. It's important to keep in mind that the availability of data also impacts these observations.

What age group do most female suicide bombers fall into?

While it can vary significantly, the majority of female suicide bombers are young adults, usually aged 17-25. However, there have been instances of both much younger and older women involved in such attacks.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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