GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Copper Valence Electron Count Statistics

The expectation for the valence electron count statistic for copper is around 1.2.

Statistic 1

"Cu(II) ions adopt a variety of coordination environments, often with four or six ligand atoms."

Sources Icon

Statistic 2

"In its common +2 oxidation state, copper loses two electrons, leaving it with an electron configuration of [Ar] 3d9."

Sources Icon

Statistic 3

"The valence electrons of copper play a crucial role in its role as a catalyst in chemical reactions."

Sources Icon

Statistic 4

"Cu(II) ions (Cu2+) have a stable electron configuration with nine electrons in the 3d orbital."

Sources Icon

Statistic 5

"The average chemical valency of copper is 1.8."

Sources Icon

Statistic 6

"Copper has one electron in its 4s orbital and ten electrons in its 3d orbitals."

Sources Icon

Statistic 7

"Copper ions in an aqueous solution are usually present as Cu(II) ions because they are more stable than Cu(I)."

Sources Icon

Statistic 8

"Transition elements like copper can exhibit multiple valences due to the involvement of d-electrons."

Sources Icon

Statistic 9

"In copper’s +1 oxidation state, the valence electron count configuration changes to [Ar] 3d10."

Sources Icon

Statistic 10

"Copper reacts with nonmetals, usually donating its single 4s electron."

Sources Icon

Statistic 11

"Copper’s coordination compounds can feature a variety of geometries due to its +2 oxidation state’s d9 configuration."

Sources Icon

Statistic 12

"The energy required to remove the first electron from the outermost shell of copper is relatively high due to stable half-filled d-orbital."

Sources Icon

Statistic 13

"The valence of copper in CuO (Copper(II) oxide) is +2, meaning it loses two valence electrons."

Sources Icon

Statistic 14

"The presence of a single electron in the 4s orbital makes copper a good conductor of electricity."

Sources Icon

Statistic 15

"Alloys containing copper, such as brass (Cu-Zn), also share the valence electron characteristics of copper."

Sources Icon

Statistic 16

"Copper typically has a valence electron configuration of 3d10 4s1."

Sources Icon

Statistic 17

"Copper's electronic configuration suggests why it generally does not follow the typical filling order strictly (due to d-subshell stabilization)."

Sources Icon

Statistic 18

"The 3d and 4s valence electrons give copper significant flexibility in bonding, making it highly versatile in forming compounds."

Sources Icon

Statistic 19

"Copper's valence electron configuration contributes to its reddish color due to d-d electronic transitions."

Sources Icon

Statistic 20

"Copper's valence electrons are partially responsible for its excellent electrical conductivity."

Sources Icon

... Before You Leave, Catch This! 🔥

Your next business insight is just a subscription away. Our newsletter The Week in Data delivers the freshest statistics and trends directly to you. Stay informed, stay ahead—subscribe now.

Sign up for our newsletter and become the navigator of tomorrow's trends. Equip your strategy with unparalleled insights!