GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

College Educated Voting Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important College Educated Voting Statistics

  • 77% of registered voters with a postgraduate degree voted in the 2020 U.S. presidential election.
  • In 2020, about 6 in 10 American voters (61%) had at least some college education.
  • 39% of all U.S. voters in the 2016 presidential election had a four-year college degree or more education.
  • In 2018, Only 24% of non-college voters turned out, compared with 42% of college voters.
  • Among whites, 53% of college graduates voted for Biden, compared with 44% of those without a college degree.
  • 67% of voters with a postgraduate degree voted for Biden in 2020.
  • Among Black voters, 91% of those with a college degree voted for Biden, compared with 87% of those without a degree.
  • 53% of unmarried U.S. voters with a bachelor’s degree or higher voted for Biden in 2020.
  • 57% of white men without a college degree backed Trump in 2020.
  • In 2016, 71% of non-Hispanic white college graduates voted, compared to 52% of those who did not complete high school.
  • In the U.S., voters with a bachelor's degree or more education have consistently turned out to vote at higher rates than those with less education.
  • In 2020, 45% of U.S. voters with a four-year college degree backed Trump.
  • 84% of American voters holding advanced degrees used mail-in ballots in the 2020 election.
  • Voters with a college education are over 1.5 times more likely to vote than those without a high school diploma.
  • 37% of white voters without a college degree were solidly behind Trump in 2020.
  • In the 2020 U.S. presidential election, education gap between Trump and Biden voters was wider than in 2016.
  • 58% of Hispanic voters with a college degree voted for Biden in 2020.
  • In the 2016 U.S. presidential election, voters with at least some college education accounted for 72% of all votes cast.

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Grasping the dynamics that shape the voting behaviors of different social demographics such as the impact of education levels on voting trends is crucial in understanding the political landscape. This blog post will delve into the intricacies of the voting statistics among the college-educated population. Comprehensive analyses of data, trends, and the underlying factors that influence voting patterns among this demographic will be discussed. Furthermore, we will explore how these trends have evolved over the years and their ripple effects on regional and national politics.

The Latest College Educated Voting Statistics Unveiled

77% of registered voters with a postgraduate degree voted in the 2020 U.S. presidential election.

Unveiling the influential role of education in political participation, this particular statistic highlights that 77% of registered voters possessing a postgraduate degree cast their votes in the U.S. 2020 Presidential Election. In the cascade of College Educated Voting Statistics, this compelling data underscores our understanding of the distinct relationship between advanced educational attainment and voter turnout. It not only attests to the higher civic participation of those with postgraduate degrees, but it also underlines the possible impact of education on one’s propensity to engage in the democratic process. This demographic, thus, emerges as a formidable force in the electoral landscape and helps unravel the often complex dynamics that surround the realm of voter behavior.

In 2020, about 6 in 10 American voters (61%) had at least some college education.

The 2020 figure indicating about 61% of American voters possess at least some college education offers a crucial viewpoint into College Educated Voting Statistics. Primary reason includes this figure’s potential to shape and influence the political spectrum, with a higher educational attainment often correlating with distinct political beliefs and voting behavior. The statistic unveils a vast portion of the electorate with exposure to higher education, embodying diverse perspectives shaped by academic insights. Understanding this subgroup’s voting behaviors fuels a richer, deeper conversation about civic engagement, policy preferences and the evolving dynamics of the political landscape.

39% of all U.S. voters in the 2016 presidential election had a four-year college degree or more education.

In the unfolding landscape of political diorama, the statistic that 39% of all U.S. voters in the 2016 presidential election were holders of a four-year college degree, or more, generates a palpable stir. It serves as a potential bellwether, shedding light on the increased political significance of the educated populace. This metric infers that education, and by extension, informed discernment, is no longer a sideline factor but a formidable demographic giant exercising influential sway over electoral outcomes. Therefore, any detailed analysis regarding educational attainment becomes vital to understand the shifting dynamics of voting patterns in leading democracies.

In 2018, Only 24% of non-college voters turned out, compared with 42% of college voters.

As we parse the data, a striking disparity presents itself that furthers the crux of our discussion on College Educated Voting Statistics. In 2018, an observable gulf emerges in the voter turnout between non-college and college-educated citizens, with only 24% of the former group taking to the polls, in stark contrast to the significantly higher 42% from the latter. This signals a substantial trend illustrating the pronounced influence of educational background on political engagement and voting behavior, thereby highlighting the pivotal role that education seems to play in fostering civic participation and shaping democracy.

Among whites, 53% of college graduates voted for Biden, compared with 44% of those without a college degree.

This statistic gives life to the narrative that education plays a probable role in political preference among white populations. It showcases a discernible pattern where a majority of white persons with college degrees sought the leadership of Biden over those without a college education. This paints a telling picture of how education level might influence voting decisions, serving as a crucial pivot point in the discourse around college-educated voting trends. It provokes thought into the socio-political dynamics that might be at play within educational environments and demands further exploration into the reasoning behind this voting dichotomy.

67% of voters with a postgraduate degree voted for Biden in 2020.

Laying bare the influence of education level on voting behavior, the compelling figure of 67% of postgraduate voters rallying behind Biden in 2020 punctuates our blog post about College Educated Voting Statistics. This data is pivotal in corroborating the intriguing trend of higher education levels aligning with Democratic voting tendencies, providing a nuanced understanding of voting patterns among the educated populace across the US during the 2020 elections. Furthermore, it underscores the considerable impact of academic constituency on electoral behavior, augmenting the complex discourse on demographics and politics.

Among Black voters, 91% of those with a college degree voted for Biden, compared with 87% of those without a degree.

Leveraging unprecedented data symptoms of an evolving voting demographic, the previously mentioned statistic injects a fascinating narrative in the discussion of College-Educated Voting Statistics. The information reflects a subtle, yet significant distinction within Black voters; wherein those with a college degree were more inclined towards Biden, at a rate of 91%, compared to their non-degree holding counterparts who stood at 87%. This divergence suggests an intriguing correlation wherein educational attainment may slightly influence political inclination and candidate preference. Therefore, such a statistical discrepancy provides an invaluable lens to fully appreciate the nuances of voter behavior and the effects of higher education on political leanings.

53% of unmarried U.S. voters with a bachelor’s degree or higher voted for Biden in 2020.

Delving into the layers of the U.S. electorate, an intriguing pattern unravels in the electoral preferences of college-educated, unmarried voters. The 2020 vote count registered a significant swing with about 53% of this demographic group rallying behind Biden. A focus on this statistic heightens the understanding of voting tendencies amongst this demographic. It illustrates how education intersects with marital status to influence political leanings, informing us about nuanced voter behavior. Consequently, it sheds light on the dynamic complexities of voter demographics and their impact on the electoral landscape, holding immense value for campaign strategy and more inclusive policy-making.

57% of white men without a college degree backed Trump in 2020.

In the enthralling realm of college-educated voting statistics, the telling figure that ‘57% of white men without a college degree backed Trump in 2020’ serves as a compelling benchmark. This number forms a crux in divulging the influences of educational attainment on political leanings and voting behavior. More than just a mere percentage, it powerfully encapsulates the ideological divide along lines of education and presents an intriguing representation of how education or the lack thereof influences political choice, hence substantiating the paradigm of social stratification through the lens of election. It crystallizes the correlation between the level of education and voting tendencies, thereby enriching our understanding of voting dynamics within this specific demographic subset.

In 2016, 71% of non-Hispanic white college graduates voted, compared to 52% of those who did not complete high school.

Shedding light on the disparity among voting patterns, the noteworthy statistic that in 2016, 71% of non-Hispanic white college graduates voted, as opposed to a mere 52% of those without a high school diploma, underscores the significant influence of education on civic participation. In our pursuit to holistically understand College Educated Voting Statistics, this data serves as a crucial cornerstone, reflecting not just the individual educational paces, but also offering an insight into the correlation between education and political engagement. Consequently, this statistic prompts us to deep dive into the underlying reasons and potential outcomes of this difference, fostering a broader conversation on how education impacts the democratic exercise of voting.

In the U.S., voters with a bachelor’s degree or more education have consistently turned out to vote at higher rates than those with less education.

Analyzing the propensity for college-educated individuals to vote elucidates a significant demographic trend in U.S. political participation. Crucially, this statistic underscores education’s potential to foster civic engagement, deepen political understanding, and promote active participation in democratic processes. As such, in a blog post dissecting College Educated Voting Statistics, the observation that the level of education influences voter turnout emphasizes the role that educational institutions play in cultivating politically active citizens. Furthermore, it signals potential disparities among different social groups that may influence the direction of political decision-making and policy outcomes, thus highlighting the need for voter education and outreach programs targeting less educated populations.

In 2020, 45% of U.S. voters with a four-year college degree backed Trump.

Shedding a beam of light on the relationship between academic attainments and political preference, the statistic that 45% of U.S. voters with a four-year college degree rallied behind Trump in the 2020 elections offers a compelling insight. Within the framework of exploring College Educated Voting Statistics, this data point accentuates a fascinating shift in voting patterns, disrupting the longstanding stereotype that higher education aligns strictly with liberal ideologies. Furthermore, this statistic adds a nuanced layer to our understanding of the multifaceted identity of the American voter, challenging the dichotomy between educated and less-educated voters in relation to their political leanings.

84% of American voters holding advanced degrees used mail-in ballots in the 2020 election.

Highlighting that 84% of American voters with advanced degrees leveraged mail-in ballots in the 2020 election weaves an enlightening narrative around the voting patterns and behaviors of the educated strata of society. In a discussion about College Educated Voting Statistics, this figure commands attention as it underscores how this demographic, often seen as influential and forward-thinking, is actively embracing modern, non-traditional forms of casting their votes. This sizable percentage exercising their democratic rights through mail-in voting could also illustrate their priorities and values such as safety considerations amid a global pandemic, or convenience due to professional constraints.

Voters with a college education are over 1.5 times more likely to vote than those without a high school diploma.

Unearthing the college-educated voting statistics reveals intriguing insights such as voters with a college education being over 1.5 times more likely to partake in the democratic practice than those without a high school diploma. This significant statistic paints a narrative of the power education wields over political participation. It underscores the role that academic achievement plays in fostering civic engagement and shaping voting behavior. In the broader context of voting patterns, it hints towards critical, underlying factors that drive eligible voters to (or away from) the ballot box, facilitating a more nuanced understanding of our democratic process. Highlighting this trend within the realms of education provides invaluable fodder for discussions about societal intricacies, and the potency of education as a catalyst for political participation. It’s a statistic that sets the stage for debates around education, society, and politics.

37% of white voters without a college degree were solidly behind Trump in 2020.

Delving into college educated voting statistics, one figure stands out prominently: 37% of white voters devoid of a college degree pledged their unwavering support for Trump in the 2020 election. This statistic provides intriguing insight into how education can sway political leanings: underscored by the substantial allegiance of non-college-educated white voters to Trump. It catalyzes discussions around the correlation between educational attainment, race, and voting behavior. This particular slice of data enables a deeper comprehension of voting diversities within the white demographic, whilst also highlighting how political preferences might be affected, if not shaped, by educational experiences or the lack thereof.

In the 2020 U.S. presidential election, education gap between Trump and Biden voters was wider than in 2016.

In delving into the realm of College Educated Voting Statistics, one cannot overlook the intriguing facet of the 2020 U.S. Presidential election where the education gap between Trump and Biden voters significantly outstripped that of 2016. This metric serves as a beacon, boldly illuminating the evolving correlation between educational attainment and political preference. It helps us better understand the increasingly profound divide in our electorate, as educational disparities become pivotal in shaping voting behavior. This growing trend could potentially serve as a bellwether for future strategies and tactics in political campaigns, as candidates aim to gain leverage in this age of rapidly shifting demographics and societal ideologies.

58% of Hispanic voters with a college degree voted for Biden in 2020.

The statistic that 58% of Hispanic voters with a college degree voted for Biden in 2020 illustrates a significant trend within the multifaceted dynamics of voters’ behavior. Its intrinsic role in understanding the delineation of the overall voting patterns, especially among the educated population, becomes increasingly crucial. This noteworthy data point underpins the narrative about the influence of educational attainment on political leanings and provides valuable insight into the affinity of this academically accomplished demographic, particularly among Hispanic voters, in the 2020 elections. As such, it becomes potent ammunition for scholars, pollsters, and political strategists to shape election strategies, predict voting patterns, and understand the impact of higher education on voting behavior.

In the 2016 U.S. presidential election, voters with at least some college education accounted for 72% of all votes cast.

Shedding light on the potent influence of education on political participation, the figure that college-educated voters constituted 72% of the total vote in the 2016 U.S. presidential election is remarkable. This illuminates how a significant proportion of the electorate is equipped with some form of tertiary education, potentially guiding their critical thinking and bias perception towards political issues. Just as an artist’s brush strokes shape an artwork, this statistic molds our understanding of the nuanced relationship between educational attainment and voter turnout, enhancing our comprehension of College-Educated Voting Statistics.

Conclusion

From the analysis of college educated voting statistics, it is evident that there is a significant correlation between higher education levels and voter turnout. College-educated individuals are more likely to participate in voting, showcasing the impact of education on political awareness and involvement. Therefore, promoting and broadening access to higher education could be an effective strategy to increase voter participation and foster a more politically informed population.

References

0. – https://www.www.brookings.edu

1. – https://www.nces.ed.gov

2. – https://www.www.washingtonpost.com

3. – https://www.www.pewresearch.org

4. – https://www.www.census.gov

5. – https://www.www.americanprogress.org

FAQs

What is the relationship between a college education and voting tendencies?

Studies generally suggest that individuals with a college education are more likely to vote compared to those without. The precise reasons for this are complex but it often ties to factors such as higher income and greater political engagement which are often associated with higher education.

Has there been an increase in turnout among college educated voters over the years?

Yes, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau, voting rates among those with a bachelor's degree or higher have significantly increased over the past few decades.

Do college educated individuals lean towards a specific political party?

While voting behavior can vary widely among educated individuals, data from Pew Research Center suggests that in recent years, college graduates are more likely to identify as Democrats rather than Republicans.

Are college educated women more likely to vote compared to college educated men?

According to various studies, college-educated women are generally more likely to vote than college-educated men.

Are there differences in voting patterns among people with different levels of education beyond college?

Yes, individuals with postgraduate degrees tend to have even higher voting rates than those with only a bachelor’s degree. These differences can be attributed to various factors, such as greater income and occupational stability that comes with higher educational attainment.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

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