GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Coal Industry Jobs Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Coal Industry Jobs Statistics

  • In 2020, the U.S. coal mining industry employed around 41,000 people.
  • Kentucky had 3,909 coal jobs identified in 2020.
  • Coal jobs in West Virginia dropped down by 1,016 from 2019 to 2020.
  • Coal mining jobs in Wyoming decreased 4% from 5,262 to 5,036 between 2018 and 2019.
  • Queensland, Australia, had more than 37,800 full-time equivalent jobs in coal mining in 2020.
  • In 2020, China's coal mining industry reported 50% overcapacity.
  • In 1980, the U.S. coal industry employed over 250,000 workers.
  • European Union had 185,000 coal jobs in 2015.
  • Coal mining jobs in the UK declined from 1,200,000 jobs in 1920 to nearly zero in 2018.
  • From 2008 to 2017, Indian coal industry added about 93,000 jobs.
  • The Indian state of Jharkhand had about 200,000 direct and indirect jobs linked to the coal industry in 2017.
  • Indonesia's coal mining sector provided employment to 200,000 people in 2018.
  • In 2013, around 52,000 people were employed in Germany’s coal industry including not only mining but also supply and power generation.
  • According to a 2019 report, 46,600 new jobs were created through renewable energy in South Africa, compared to the 86,919 people directly employed in the coal sector.
  • In 2018, around 83,000 people were employed in the coal sector in Russia.
  • Colombia had about 89,000 direct and indirect jobs in the coal industry in 2011.
  • Romania had around 18,000 jobs in the coal industry in 2018.
  • In 2012, Poland had around 112,000 jobs in the coal sector.
  • Brazil had around 8,077 jobs in the coal industry in 2018.
  • In 2019, Vietnam’s Vinacomin Group, the major coal producer in the country, provided jobs for over 96,000 employees.

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Delve into the fascinating, albeit controversial, world of the coal industry as we explore its job statistics in our latest blog post. We’ll discuss trends, analyze figures, and look into long-term employment patterns. Covering a variety of angles, from regional variation to the impact of renewable energy initiatives on job creation and loss, our aim is to provide a comprehensive and balanced perspective. Understanding the numeric dynamics of coal industry jobs not only illuminates the industry’s current state, but also offers insight into its potential future within the larger context of global energy production.

The Latest Coal Industry Jobs Statistics Unveiled

In 2020, the U.S. coal mining industry employed around 41,000 people.

Crafting a vivid picture of the coal industry’s current landscape, the statistic that the U.S. coal mining industry employed around 41,000 people in 2020 provides an incredibly tangible metric for understanding industry trends and impacts. Within the blog’s context on Coal Industry Jobs Statistics, this figure becomes a key piece in the puzzle, offering insights into workforce size, potential contribution to the economy, and potentially serving as an indicator of energy demand shifts or technological advancements within the sector. It’s a numerical testimony to the prevalent changes, challenges, and conceivable future of the coal industry.

Kentucky had 3,909 coal jobs identified in 2020.

In the textured fabric of the Coal Industry Jobs Statistics blog post, the inclusion of the datum specifying “Kentucky had 3,909 coal jobs identified in 2020” serves a pivotal role. It not only reflects the jobs panorama within a specific state, but also weaves a story about the economic climate, the impacts of energy policies, industrial trends, and the demands of the market. It yields insights into the coal industry’s workforce scale, and when juxtaposed against other states or different timelines, it paints a richer, multi-dimensional perspective about the industry’s labor dynamics and wider implications.

Coal jobs in West Virginia dropped down by 1,016 from 2019 to 2020.

Shedding light on the continuing narrative of the coal industry’s decline, the reduction of a noteworthy 1,016 coal jobs in West Virginia from 2019 to 2020 paints a tangible picture of the ongoing shift in energy sources. It underscores the economic ramifications for a state historically dependent on this sector, intensify its importance in discussions around labor market trends, and reiterate the need for more diverse, sustainable job solutions within such fossil-dependent regions. This specific insight aligns with the broader goal of a post devoted to Coal Industry Job Statistics, which is to dissect and illuminate the transformations within this critical industry.

Coal mining jobs in Wyoming decreased 4% from 5,262 to 5,036 between 2018 and 2019.

Painting a potent picture of industry fluctuations, the 4% drop in Wyoming’s coal mining jobs from 5,262 to 5,036 between 2018 and 2019 underscores the dynamic state of the coal industry. Synthesizing this numeric dip through the lens of the larger Coal Industry Jobs Statistics, the reader not only acquires an understanding of local employment trends but also gleans insights into the wider implications of the fossil fuel sector’s trajectory. This narrative reveals stories far beyond regional job shifts, hinting at wider economic, political and environmental themes which underscore the fundamental complexity and captivating transformation of America’s energy landscape.

Queensland, Australia, had more than 37,800 full-time equivalent jobs in coal mining in 2020.

Highlighting the fact that Queensland, Australia, reported over 37,800 full-time equivalent positions in coal mining in 2020 underpins the significant role of the coal industry in the country’s employment landscape. This figure not only represents the livelihood of a vast number of individuals and families, but also underscores the importance of mining-related occupations to Queensland’s economy. Therefore, in the thread of a discourse on Coal Industry Jobs Statistics, this data point acts as a testament to the industry’s workforce contribution and its potential impacts on decision-making related to employment policies, local economies, and industry development.

In 2020, China’s coal mining industry reported 50% overcapacity.

Drawing attention to the striking figure of 50% overcapacity in China’s coal mining industry in 2020 sheds a distinct light on the global trends in Coal Industry Jobs Statistics. It implies that even as the largest producer and consumer of coal worldwide, China has a significant surplus, challenging job security and leading to potential layoffs in the industry. The surplus also reflects on the broader economic forces at play, namely, a decrease in demand for coal and an increase in renewable energy sources. This fascinating piece of data hence serves as a critical touchstone when outlining the job trends and future employment landscape within the global coal industry.

In 1980, the U.S. coal industry employed over 250,000 workers.

Highlighting the historical peak of coal industry employment in 1980 with over 250,000 workers is a significant pivot point for any discussion revolving around job trends in this sector. It offers a clear reference point or benchmark for comparative analysis over the years, plotting the trajectory of the industry’s employment patterns. Consequently, this data adds weight to the dialogues concerning changes in industry dynamics, economic transition, policy impact, and labor market shifts in the realm of the U.S. coal industry.

European Union had 185,000 coal jobs in 2015.

In a global snapshot of the ever-changing panorama of coal industry jobs, the figure of 185,000 European Union coal jobs in 2015 stands as a significant landmark. This statistic, robust in its number, underlines the substantial role coal has played in the EU’s energy sector, workforce, and overall economy. Showcasing the sheer scale of the coal industry at the time, it further acts as a pivotal reference point to gauge the impact of subsequent renewable energy policies, transition in the energy mix, or coal phase-outs across the bloc. Hence, for a comprehensive reflection on Coal Industry Jobs Statistics, the mention of this specific figure is indispensable.

Coal mining jobs in the UK declined from 1,200,000 jobs in 1920 to nearly zero in 2018.

The seismic shift in the coal mining jobs, dramatically plummeting from a booming 1,200,000 positions in 1920 to almost nil in 2018 in the UK, illuminates the radical transformation of the coal industry over a nearly a century. This startling statistic is a powerful testament to changing times, highlighting the harsh reality of an industry once thriving but now virtually extinct. Within the landscape of Coal Industry Jobs Statistics, this number tolls a tolling bell, underscoring not only the changes in the energy sector, but the broader economic, environmental, and social shifts that have ushered in the twilight of the coal era in the UK.

From 2008 to 2017, Indian coal industry added about 93,000 jobs.

Highlighting the creation of approximately 93,000 jobs in the Indian coal industry from 2008 to 2017 not only underscores the increasing significance of this sector in promoting employment opportunities in India, it also reflects its contribution to the nation’s socio-economic development. In a blog post focusing on Coal Industry Jobs Statistics, this data offers irrefutable evidence of how the coal sector, despite global environmental debates, continues to be a robust pillar of India’s employment landscape and plays a pivotal role in driving regional economies. This data also stimulates further discussion on the sustainability and future prospects of jobs generated by this industry.

The Indian state of Jharkhand had about 200,000 direct and indirect jobs linked to the coal industry in 2017.

Shining a spot light on the importance of the coal industry within the employment sector, particularly in regions like Jharkhand in India, underscores its significance and widespread impact. In 2017 alone, approximately 200,000 positions, encompassing both direct and indirect roles, were reportedly tied to this industry in the state. Any discourse centered around jobs linked to the coal industry simply cannot disregard these numbers. An in-depth evaluation of these job figures leaks indispensable insights about the industry’s role in fueling local economies, supporting livelihoods, and its potential influence on employment trends. This kind of data becomes a cornerstone in any broader analysis of the coal industry’s impact on job markets and regional economic stability.

Indonesia’s coal mining sector provided employment to 200,000 people in 2018.

Within the grand tapestry of coal industry jobs statistics, the datum revealing Indonesia’s coal mining sector to have provided employment to 200,000 individuals in 2018 stands out as a gem of significance. Not only does this figure underline the sector’s role as an essential backbone within Indonesia’s economy, it also illustrates the broader implication of the industry’s socioeconomic impact by acting as an employment powerhouse. Thus, when exploring the multifaceted world of coal industry employment, one cannot overlook the Indonesian example as a vital touchstone demonstrating the industry’s potential to offer extensive employment opportunities.

In 2013, around 52,000 people were employed in Germany’s coal industry including not only mining but also supply and power generation.

Highlighting the number of individuals employed within Germany’s coal industry, both directly and indirectly through roles in supply and power generation, underscores the scale and economic significance of this sector. Given in a 2013 context, this figure serves as a benchmark to monitor trends in employment over time, potentially reflecting changes in policy, technology, market demand, or other influencing factors. Within a blog post centered on Coal Industry Jobs Statistics, this statistical illustration provides a crucial piece of the narrative, translating abstract concepts into tangible human impact, and setting the stage for further discussion on the socio-economic implications of the coal industry.

According to a 2019 report, 46,600 new jobs were created through renewable energy in South Africa, compared to the 86,919 people directly employed in the coal sector.

Leapfrogging into the spotlight, the statistic cites a 2019 report revealing an impressive creation of 46,600 new jobs through renewable energy in South Africa, which positions itself against the 86,919 individuals directly employed in the coal sector. It essentially fuels the dialogue around the transformation of energy sectors, significantly highlighting the burgeoning potential of renewable resources as a substantial job creator. When viewed against the backdrop of a blog post about Coal Industry Jobs, this data challenges the conventional perception of coal as the predominant provider of employment, indicating a shift towards a more diversified, sustainable and job-rich energy economy.

In 2018, around 83,000 people were employed in the coal sector in Russia.

Highlighting the fact that in 2018, Russia’s coal sector employed approximately 83,000 individuals introduces real-world relevance to the topic at hand, providing a glimpse into the large workforce that operates within this key industry. This figure gives the discussion depth and dimension, helping readers to understand the true scale of the coal industry’s contribution to employment, particularly in regions like Russia where coal mining plays a significant role in the economy. It’s a compelling piece of data that underscores the importance of tracking statistics within specific sectors, supporting the visualization of the coal industry’s job market and potentially influencing discussions about its social and economic impacts.

Colombia had about 89,000 direct and indirect jobs in the coal industry in 2011.

The vitality of Colombia’s coal industry in 2011 shines through in the hefty figure of approximately 89,000 individuals employed directly and indirectly. The data point illuminates the industry’s profound economic impact, serving as a linchpin not just for the thousands directly maneuvering coal mines, but also the auxiliary sectors like transport, equipment suppliers, and ancillary services that rely heavily on the coal industry’s dynamism. Consequently, any fluctuations in the coal industry jobs sector might reverberate far beyond the coal mines, cascading through numerous households and secondary sector employment, thereby echoing the industry’s overarching role in the nation’s economic health.

Romania had around 18,000 jobs in the coal industry in 2018.

Spotlighting Romania’s coal industry employment figure of approximately 18,000 in 2018 serves as an essential point of reference within our coal industry jobs statistical analysis discussion. Not only does it provide specific insight into Romania’s economic dependability on the coal sector, but it also enables comparison with other countries to appreciate the global spectrum of coal-reliant economies. This concrete figure illustrates the human face behind the industry; thus, any transition towards renewable resources would have pronounced implications for these workers. Therefore, its essential to study these statistics to craft plausible solutions for possible future shifts.

In 2012, Poland had around 112,000 jobs in the coal sector.

Highlighting the fact that Poland harbored approximately 112,000 coal sector jobs in 2012 paints an important picture in the canvas of Coal Industry Jobs Statistics. It highlights Poland’s reliance and heavy investment in the coal industry at that time, which might have shaped their energy landscape and influenced the country’s economy. The number and trend of these jobs provide valuable insights into labor market dynamics, the economic role of the coal industry, and it may illustrate how shifts in energy policies, market conditions, or technological advances could impact employment within the sector.

Brazil had around 8,077 jobs in the coal industry in 2018.

Delving into the numeric labyrinth of coal industry jobs, Brazil’s employment statistics offer tangible evidence of the nation’s coal-dependent economy in 2018, with 8,077 recorded jobs. This figure, emblazoned in stark digits, is emblematic of the nation’s reliance on the coal industry for not just energy generation, but also robust employment opportunities. In the broader narrative of coal industry job statistics, it also serves as a touchpoint for comparison, revealing both global trends in the energy market, as well as elucidating Brazil’s economic path as they navigate and balance growing environmental concerns and job market realities.

In 2019, Vietnam’s Vinacomin Group, the major coal producer in the country, provided jobs for over 96,000 employees.

Uniting the threads of economic impact, employment data, and the power of the coal industry, the example of the Vinacomin Group in Vietnam shines brightly. In 2019 alone, this pivotal entity was confirmed as a significant powerhouse not just in energy production but also in job creation in Vietnam, orchestrating employment opportunities for more than 96,000 individuals. Thus, when we delve deep into the coal industry jobs statistics, the relevance of such massive employment numbers emerges emphatically. They highlight the strength and sustainability of the coal industry from an economic point of view and underscore its crucial role as a substantial employment generator in specific global regions.

Conclusion

In view of the latest statistics, it is evident that the coal industry is in a state of substantial decline. A combination of factors including the impact of environmental policies, the advent of renewable energy sources, and market competition has caused a significant drop in coal industry jobs. Many areas once heavily dependent on these jobs are having to adapt and diversify their economies. Despite these challenges, it ultimately presents an opportunity for transition towards more sustainable and resilient industries.

References

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FAQs

How many jobs does the coal industry provide in the U.S.?

According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the coal industry supports approximately 50,000 jobs in the U.S. as of 2020.

How has the number of jobs in the coal industry changed over the years?

The number of jobs in the coal industry has decreased over the years. In 2014, approximately 80,000 people were employed in the industry, compared with 50,000 in 2020, representing a significant decrease.

What types of jobs are common in the coal industry?

Jobs in the coal industry varies but commonly include coal miners, engineers, geologists, safety supervisors, research scientists, and administrative support.

Which state in the U.S. has the most coal industry jobs?

As per U.S. Energy Information Administration, West Virginia has the most coal industry jobs, followed closely by Kentucky.

How does the average wage in the coal industry compare to other industries?

The average wage in the coal industry is generally higher than the national average when considering directly hired workers, largely due to the specialized nature of the work and the inherent risks associated with working in a mine.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

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