GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Assisted Suicide In Canada Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Assisted Suicide In Canada Statistics

  • As of 2017, deaths due to medical assistance in dying (MAID) accounted for approximately 1.12% of all deaths in Canada.
  • Approximately 84% of all reported MAID deaths took place within the individual’s primary residence or a hospital setting.
  • The largest proportion of MAID deaths in Canada in 2019 involved individuals aged 56-90 (80.9%).
  • As of 2019, there had been 13,946 medically assisted deaths in Canada since legislation was passed in 2016.
  • Less than 6% of physicians in Canada provide medical assistance in dying.
  • In 2019, cancer was the most cited underlying medical condition among MAID recipients, accounting for approximately 67.2% of cases.
  • Almost a third of those who receive MAID in Canada have a neurological condition (29.7%).
  • The average age of a Canadian who dies with medical assistance is 75.
  • The Atlantic provinces have the lowest rate of MAID, with 7.5 deaths per 100,000 population in 2019.
  • Ontario has the highest number of assisted deaths, with almost 50% of all cases in the country.
  • There was a 7% decline in the number of unique clinicians who participated in MAID-related assessments or provisions from 2018 and 2019.
  • Number of written requests for MAID was 26,882 for the period between 2016 and 2021.
  • The average length of the patient-practitioner relationship prior to making a MAID request was 2 years.
  • Patients received medical assistance in dying most frequently in their own home (41.6%).
  • Between 2016 - 2021, the highest number of requests for medical-assistance in dying per 100,000 residents was in British Columbia (472.7), followed by Nova Scotia (456.6), and Quebec (429.7).
  • From 2016 to 2019, the vast majority (82.1%) of Canadians who received MAID had a malignant neoplasm (cancer).
  • In 2019, the length of process for MAID (from first request to death) was 58.5 days on average.
  • During the period between 2016 and 2019, the count of total MAID deaths in Canada is 13,946, mean annual growth rate of MAID deaths was 55.9%, and the ratio of MAID deaths to total deaths was 1.89%.
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Assisted suicide, also known as Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID), is a deeply complex and emotive topic currently at the forefront of healthcare debates worldwide. Within this blog post, we will explore a multitude of statistical data pertaining to assisted suicide in Canada. Through reviewing and interpreting these statistics, compiled from reputable sources, we aim to provide a comprehensive overview that digs beneath the surface figures to illuminate the broader social, ethical, and healthcare narratives they convey. This in-depth analysis may aid a better understanding of the current MAID landscape, enabling informed debate on the controversial issue.

The Latest Assisted Suicide In Canada Statistics Unveiled

As of 2017, deaths due to medical assistance in dying (MAID) accounted for approximately 1.12% of all deaths in Canada.

The woven narrative of assisted suicide in Canada is underscored by the stark fact that, in 2017, roughly 1.12% of all mortalities were a direct consequence of medical assistance in dying (MAID). This figure, though seemingly small, whispers a potent tale of individuals exercising their autonomy in the ending of their lives. It underscores the increasing relevance of MAID in the spectrum of end-of-life care, subtly hinting at the sociocultural shift trending towards acceptance of such measures. The data prompts us, the spectators, to consider the diverse perspectives and poignant personal experiences that underpin this contemplative discourse on the morality, ethics, and legality of assisted suicide.

Approximately 84% of all reported MAID deaths took place within the individual’s primary residence or a hospital setting.

The figure that around 84% of all reported Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID) deaths in Canada occur within the comfort of an individual’s primary residence or a hospital, lends profound context to the discussions around assisted suicide. It subtly underscores the inclination of terminally ill or greatly suffering individuals for seeking death in the peaceful familiarity of home, or in the professional and empathetic environment of a hospital rather than in an unfamiliar or distressful setting. This statistic mirrors the reassuring facets of the MAID system in Canada, potentially easing the fear of dying in discomfort and demonstrating the respect for patient autonomy and comfort in end-of-life decisions.

The largest proportion of MAID deaths in Canada in 2019 involved individuals aged 56-90 (80.9%).

Highlighting that the most significant fraction of Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID) deaths in Canada in 2019 were individuals aged between 56 and 90 (80.9%) provides critical insight into the prevailing characteristics of those opting for this end-of-life procedure. This statistic goes beyond mere numbers, it touches base with the ethical, social, and psychological aspects of assisted suicide, not only in Canada but globally. It indicates that MAID is predominantly sought by those in the older demographics, possibly grappling with terminal, debilitating or chronically painful illnesses, exemplifying the contours of a complex, delicate issue at the intersection of population aging, palliative care, and personal autonomy. This is crucial in understanding the socio-medical landscape that frames assisted suicide in its Canadian context.

As of 2019, there had been 13,946 medically assisted deaths in Canada since legislation was passed in 2016.

The stark figure of 13,946 medically assisted deaths in Canada, recorded from the passage of legislation in 2016 to 2019, serves as compelling testament to the profound impact of such policy changes, while also granting meaningful depth to our understanding of assisted suicide in the country. It not only illuminates the extent and gravity of the public response to the availability of this option, but also serves as a crucial marker for ongoing conversations about ethical, medical, and legal intersections of such practices. This poignant data point, therefore, provides us with an incisive lens to further dissect, discuss, and discern the broader narratives of assisted suicide in the Canadian context.

Less than 6% of physicians in Canada provide medical assistance in dying.

Unveiling a stark panorama, the figure underlines that fewer than 6% of Canadian doctors deliver medical end-of-life aid, thereby offering invaluable perspective within the discourse of Assisted Suicide in Canada Statistics. It sheds light not only on the accessibility of such services, suggesting potential barriers for patients seeking this choice but also prompts a more in-depth examination of the reasons behind this limited participation. It challenges us to consider factors like personal, ethical, moral beliefs and the need for improved support and legislation that might influence health care professionals’ involvement. This statistic serves as a crucial milestone toboth ignite conversations around the subject and inform policy-making, shaping future steps towards aligning the practice with a patient’s right to decide their end-of-life path.

In 2019, cancer was the most cited underlying medical condition among MAID recipients, accounting for approximately 67.2% of cases.

In the landscape of assisted suicide in Canada, the statistic that 67.2% of Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID) recipients in 2019 had underlying cancer diagnoses underscores cancer’s sobering role as a leading push factor. This figure not only emphasizes the profound physical and emotional pain cancer patients often contend with, prompting their pursuit of MAID, but also highlights the potential gaps in palliative care options. Further, it serves as a critical reminder of the continued urgent need for breakthrough innovations in cancer treatments to increase survival rates and improve end-of-life experiences.

Almost a third of those who receive MAID in Canada have a neurological condition (29.7%).

Looking deeply into the statistic that almost a third of those who receive Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID) in Canada have a neurological condition (29.7%), brings to light the silent struggles endured by individuals with such conditions. This crucial insight highlights the relatively higher inclination of individuals with neurological disorders towards assisted suicide, painting a somber picture of their daily battles against distressing symptoms, deteriorating physical abilities, and diminishing quality of life. It underscores the urgent necessity for comprehensive palliative care options, improved therapies, and potentially more supportive policies for this particularly vulnerable segment of the population.

The average age of a Canadian who dies with medical assistance is 75.

Framing the raw number of 75, the mean age of a Canadian choosing assisted suicide, into the narrative of the blog post about Assisted Suicide In Canada, provides an imperative perspective on understanding the demographic data. It offers insight into the age group most likely to use assisted suicide and aids in dispelling common myths about this medical practice—rather than affecting primarily young or middle-aged patients, it serves largely as a last resort for elderly individuals with irreparable health conditions. Thus, this figure contributes significantly towards broadening the readers’ understanding of the real-world implications and audience of medical aid in dying within the context of Canadian society.

The Atlantic provinces have the lowest rate of MAID, with 7.5 deaths per 100,000 population in 2019.

In a discussion centered around Assisted Suicide In Canada Statistics, an intriguing deviation can be noted in case of the Atlantic provinces, which show the lowest recorded rate of Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID), standing at 7.5 deaths per 100,000 population in 2019. This striking datum is instrumental in illuminating regional disparities in the uptake of MAID across the country. It potentially throws into sharp relief various influencing factors, such as accessibility and availability of services, public awareness, cultural attitudes, individual preferences, and the role of healthcare professionals, thereby shaping our understanding and conversation around this critical, ethically charged issue.

Ontario has the highest number of assisted deaths, with almost 50% of all cases in the country.

Diving into the depths of Assisted Suicide In Canada Statistics, it is noteworthy to recognise that Ontario is the epicentre, registering almost half of all assisted deaths in the country. This figure represents a remarkable concentration of cases that acts like a compass steering the direction of analysis on this complex topic. It begs exploration of possible underlying drivers, such as provincial policies, healthcare accessibility, and societal attitudes, and merits a comparative approach with other regions. This numerical nugget shines a spotlight on Ontario, elevating it as a critical focal point in the broader discourse on assisted suicide in Canada.

There was a 7% decline in the number of unique clinicians who participated in MAID-related assessments or provisions from 2018 and 2019.

Diving deep into the currents of Assisted Suicide In Canada, it’s intriguing to unpick a 7% tumble in the count of unique clinicians participating in MAID (Medical Assistance In Dying)-related assessments or provisions between 2018 and 2019. This mysterious downtick presents an opportunity for reflection. It could symbolize an evolving perspective towards assisted death among medical professionals, or perhaps be indicative of shifting policies or procedures making it harder for practitioners to provide these services. Alternatively, it might also point towards issues about support or burnout in medical professionals dealing with intense end-of-life decisions. Whatever the case, this statistical dip gives readers valuable insight into potential challenges in the implementation of MAID that deserves further inquiry.

Number of written requests for MAID was 26,882 for the period between 2016 and 2021.

The highlighted figure that reads ‘26,882 written requests for MAID between 2016 and 2021’ provides an important focal point in understanding the landscape of assisted suicide in Canada. It not only reflects the increasing acceptance and utilisation of Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID) as an end-of-life choice, a shift towards autonomy even in matters as significant as one’s own demise, but also prompts one to consider the legislative, ethical and practical nuances influencing this trend. By analyzing and addressing these requests, lawmakers, healthcare providers, and society at large can glean insights about the prevailing attitudes, potential pitfalls, and necessary refinements in this highly sensitive and game-changing policy.

The average length of the patient-practitioner relationship prior to making a MAID request was 2 years.

Drawing attention to the two-year average length of the patient-practitioner relationship prior to a Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID) request makes a bold commentary on the dynamics of trust and shared decision-making in Assisted Suicide. In the sensitive context of Assisted Suicide in Canada, this time period illuminates the complexity and depth of the conversations between the practitioners and patients, suggesting a solid rapports prior to making such a profound, moral decision. This insight could be fundamental, shaping policies to further foster trustful relationships and nuanced discussions, ultimately helping to safeguard the patient’s best interests in the realm of Assisted Suicide.

Patients received medical assistance in dying most frequently in their own home (41.6%).

Unpacking this crucial data point, it emerges that a significant proportion of medical assistance in dying in Canada occurs within the familiar, comforting environment of a patient’s own home, precisely 41.6%. This is not an arbitrary figure but rather, a reflective testament to how this practice mirrors the deeply personal and intimate nature of the end-of-life journey. In the nuanced discourse on assisted suicide, such statistical insight reinforces the emphasis on autonomy and personal choice in defining the circumstances of one’s final farewell, encouraging a more comprehensive understanding of the practice’s implementation across Canadian society. This home-based preference could also signal towards broader discussions on health and social care policies and resources in aid of terminally-ill patients wishing to spend their final hours at home.

Between 2016 – 2021, the highest number of requests for medical-assistance in dying per 100,000 residents was in British Columbia (472.7), followed by Nova Scotia (456.6), and Quebec (429.7).

In the realm of assisted suicide discussions in Canada, the striking statistic showcasing that from 2016-2021, British Columbia took the lead with 472.7 requests for medical-assistance in dying per 100,000 residents, followed by Nova Scotia (456.6), and Quebec (429.7), serves not only as mere numbers churning through a spreadsheet. It paints a vivid picture of regional differences and potential variances in cultural, societal, or healthcare perspectives toward this sensitive issue. Therefore, this statistic is a significant focal point in understanding how the assisted-suicide narrative unravels across diverse provinces, shedding light upon regional trends, societal norms, and the public’s reception toward this practice, thereby allowing a nuanced investigation into the factors driving these numbers.

From 2016 to 2019, the vast majority (82.1%) of Canadians who received MAID had a malignant neoplasm (cancer).

The prevalence of cancer as the primary underlying medical condition (82.1%) among those receiving Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID) in Canada from 2016 to 2019 illuminates a profound narrative. It paints a stark portrait of the role terminal illness plays in the consideration for assisted suicide, reflecting the potential severity and suffering associated with cancer. In a context where we are exploring the forces that drive assisted suicide requests, this figure is instructive, serving as a lighthouse guiding us through the murky waters of this complex issue.

In 2019, the length of process for MAID (from first request to death) was 58.5 days on average.

Delving into the 2019 averages for the Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID) process offers insightful context for understanding the timeline patients experience in Canada. With a duration of 58.5 days from first request to death, this average encapsulates the complex process—speaking volumes about the time individuals must wait, reflecting patient experiences, healthcare efficiency, and potential stresses within the system. In a country where assisted suicide is legally sanctioned, these durations are not only vital indicators of the system’s responsiveness but also underscore the ethical balance between the patient’s right to a dignified death and necessary medical and legal safeguards.

During the period between 2016 and 2019, the count of total MAID deaths in Canada is 13,946, mean annual growth rate of MAID deaths was 55.9%, and the ratio of MAID deaths to total deaths was 1.89%.

Drilling down the layers of the intriguing world of Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID), the compelling statistic that 13,946 deaths occurred in Canada from 2016 to 2019 underpins the rising prevalence of assisted suicide. A staggering annual mean growth of 55.9% suggests a rapidly intensifying acceptance or need for MAID, stirring new conversations in society. With MAID representing 1.89% of total deaths, it takes a significant stand, carving out its own niche in the mortality landscape. Giving this quantifiable shape to the MAID phenomenon puts the issue into perspective, fostering needed dialogue and nuanced understanding of the role of assisted suicide in modern-day Canada.

Conclusion

The statistics on assisted suicide in Canada indicate a notable increase in its prevalence since its legalization in 2016. These numbers show not only a growing societal acceptance but also an urgent need to continually evaluate the effectiveness and ethical implications of the existing legal framework. The data demonstrates the significant demand for end-of-life choices and the importance of providing comprehensive and compassionate palliative care, while ensuring rigorous safeguards are in place to protect the vulnerable populations. It’s essential, therefore, to continue monitoring these statistics for a better understanding and improvements of policies related to euthanasia in Canada.

References

0. – https://www.lifesitenews.com

1. – https://www.www.ctvnews.ca

2. – https://www.theconversation.com

3. – https://www.www150.statcan.gc.ca

4. – https://www.www.frontiersin.org

5. – https://www.www.utoronto.ca

6. – https://www.www.cmaj.ca

7. – https://www.www.canada.ca

FAQs

What is the legal status of assisted suicide in Canada?

Assisted suicide, also known as Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD), is legal in Canada. The Supreme Court ruled in February 2015 that doctors may help patients with severe and incurable suffering to die.

Who is eligible for Medical Assistance in Dying in Canada?

To be eligible for assisted suicide in Canada, an individual must be at least 18 years old, a Canadian resident or citizen, able to make health decisions for themselves, have a serious and incurable illness, disease, or disability, be in an advanced state of irreversible decline, and their natural death must be reasonably foreseeable.

How many Canadians have chosen Medical Assistance in Dying since its legalization?

According to the Canadian Government's report, between January 2016 and October 2020, over 21,000 Canadians have ended their lives through Medical Assistance in Dying.

What percentage of deaths in Canada are due to Medical Assistance in Dying?

As of 2019, deaths due to Medical Assistance in Dying represent approximately 2% of all deaths in Canada. The percentage has steadily increased from 0.6% in 2016, following the legalization of MAiD.

What is the common disease among patients opting for Medical Assistance in Dying in Canada?

The most common underlying medical conditions among individuals who received Medical Assistance in Dying in Canada are cancer-related, which represent approximately 64.4% of all MAiD deaths. Other conditions include neurological, circulatory, and respiratory system-related diseases.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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